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Using faa publications for uk PPL education

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Using faa publications for uk PPL education

Old 10th May 2020, 15:41
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Using faa publications for uk PPL education

Hey,

Iím looking to start my PPL education soon, I decided based on a lot of peopleís feedback on the internet to do ground school and learn the theory before doing any practical lessons as I want my lessons to be fully focused on improving and learning and therefore not having to waste money by not being focused enough.

I will be ordering some Pooley books used or new soonish. However I found the faa publication ďpilots handbook of aeronautical knowledgeĒ (sorry canít post the url due to account limitations) which seems to replace volume 1 of Pooley flying training. It seems like a useful guide and itís free which is great but Iím weary that itís published by the FAA and I believe European regulations are a lot more strict than the American ones so I donít want to learn something that canít be done here.

So Iíd like to know how useful FAA publications can be for learning for the uk PPL and if thereís any other recommended free resources I can use to learn?

Thank you for any help.
TropicSeeker98 is offline  
Old 10th May 2020, 19:24
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Since nobody else appears to be responding I'll put forward my thoughts.

The Americans teach and test some manoeuvres that we don't. They also teach some of our rather unique procedures differently. As an ab initio student you will be unable to know which bits to ignore. More importantly, the situation is even more diverse when it comes to Air Law, Operational Procedures and some of the other technical subjects that you will have to study. For example, the FARs allow much more freedom flying over built up areas than our ANO does. From my experience, you need the Pooley's type of UK books if you want to get ahead of the game and to ever be ready for the nine (currently) written exams. Once the new online exam system is underway, only the most up to date UK published books will work.

If you are able to, please feel free to PM me, Putting aside my normal modesty, I've been flying nearly 40 years on a UK licence and I completed the separate training and testing for a stand alone FAA licence 30 years ago.
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Old 10th May 2020, 19:44
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It's good that you are planning ahead. I would suggest dealing with the air law and theory of flight, probably also human factors, first. Meteorology and navigation might be easier to learn one you have done some flying, especially navigation, as that will give context to your learning.
You could investigate public libraries for free books. Be aware that some subjects need up to date study matter. With internet learning that should be fine, and there is no reason not to look more deeply into all subjects. It's not just about putting the tick in the right box, after all.
Have fun, studying and flying.
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Old 10th May 2020, 20:12
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I would suggest dealing with the air law and theory of flight
Seconded. When I took the PPL ground class, brilliantly given by a university don who was also a private flyer, air law was the first book of the syllabus engaged. With however one notable exception: the altimeter, and the meaning of "altitude" vs. "height" and QNH and all that. One needs those terms to understand air law.
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Old 10th May 2020, 20:15
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I'll put in a different view. Get that FAA book and read it. I generally find books written for an American audience to be a far more gentle introduction to a subject - sometimes to the point of tedious - but if it gets too tedious you just put it away, no money wasted. Having the Pooleys (or AFE) books to offer a competing view and sometimes a different explanation can only reinforce what you learn.

Even if you did 100% of the theory the FAA way, during your practical lessons you'll quickly find that here in Europe things are done differently. And even within the European states, despite EASA, stuff is different from state to state. Heck, even from airfield to airfield. So apart from the generic theory that is presented in subjects like Air Law, at some point in time you will have to start browsing the actual source documents instead of a summary. So at the very least get a good glance through documents like the various country AIPs, plus EASA Part-FCL, Part-MED and Part-NCO. So you know what's in these documents generally, and where to go if you ever need that info.
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Old 10th May 2020, 20:16
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Originally Posted by Jan Olieslagers View Post
Seconded. When I took the PPL ground class, brilliantly given by a university don who was also a private flyer, air law was the first book of the syllabus engaged. With however one notable exception: the altimeter, and the meaning of "altitude" vs. "height" and QNH and all that. One needs those terms to understand air law.
Iím assuming some of these topics are more interesting than others, are any of the examined topics particularly dry but also really crucial? I just want to know so I make sure I put in more time on that one as I know the dryer the thing is the less fun it is to learn.
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Old 10th May 2020, 21:02
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All of them are crucial - that should be self-evident. If they weren't, they'd not be in the syllabus.
Which of them are more or less dry to yourself will depend on yourself; but you'll have to get even with all.
Above all: learning about a favourite subject must absolutely be fun! If not, it is not really your favourite.
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Old 10th May 2020, 22:07
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Online course for a tenner. I've not done it, but did do my CPL groundschool with CATS, and the material was excellent.

https://www.catsaviation.com/courses/ppl.html

G
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Old 10th May 2020, 22:20
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Good luck with the flying, I hope you can start soon.

The way we structure the practical flying in the UK is by exercise numbers. The chapters in the Pooley's Book 1 mirror the airborne exercise numbers. So, your instructor will say 'for next time, read chapter 6 and we'll be doing exercise 6.1'. The pre-flight briefing next time should then follow the description given in the book. I guess the AFE book is the same. Most flying schools in the UK use one or the other; we're required to tell the CAA what source we use for our courses. A school has the freedom to write their own, but the CAA charge a fortune to assess it, so I can't imagine why they would. Book 1 is £23 retail, a very small proportion of the cost of learning to fly and will give you the assurance that you and your instructor are talking the same language.

'Britain and America are two nations divided by a common language.'
Attributed to George Bernard Shaw and Oscar Wilde

TOO
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Old 11th May 2020, 06:33
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Originally Posted by TheOddOne View Post
Good luck with the flying, I hope you can start soon.

The way we structure the practical flying in the UK is by exercise numbers. The chapters in the Pooley's Book 1 mirror the airborne exercise numbers. So, your instructor will say 'for next time, read chapter 6 and we'll be doing exercise 6.1'. The pre-flight briefing next time should then follow the description given in the book. I guess the AFE book is the same. Most flying schools in the UK use one or the other; we're required to tell the CAA what source we use for our courses. A school has the freedom to write their own, but the CAA charge a fortune to assess it, so I can't imagine why they would. Book 1 is £23 retail, a very small proportion of the cost of learning to fly and will give you the assurance that you and your instructor are talking the same language.

'Britain and America are two nations divided by a common language.'
Attributed to George Bernard Shaw and Oscar Wilde

TOO
Thank you, Iím not sure if youíll be able to answer this but I was looking around for schools yesterday and came up on a list of ATO certified and DTO certified schools and thereís a school near me that appears to not be certified at all under either of those two. Would it be better to go for an ATO or is there no real difference?
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Old 11th May 2020, 08:56
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There is a lot of good technical information in the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge. In summary I would say get your UK course material and focus on that. But in the meantime the PHAK is there to get you started and will remain a click away as a cross reference for those technical aspects that don't always make sense. For instance, you could definitely get a head start on things like aerodynamics and aircraft systems, but avoid the section on airspace which is not appropriate to the UK. Likewise the weather theory is generic but there is a weather services section that is mainly about a lot of excellent stuff that is not available in the UK.
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Old 11th May 2020, 09:02
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One other good "bipartisan" book is aviation wx which US pilots are really well versed in because we have the worst weather in the world here.
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Old 11th May 2020, 09:54
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Originally Posted by TropicSeeker98 View Post
Thank you, Iím not sure if youíll be able to answer this but I was looking around for schools yesterday and came up on a list of ATO certified and DTO certified schools and thereís a school near me that appears to not be certified at all under either of those two. Would it be better to go for an ATO or is there no real difference?
There is a difference between an ATO and DTO. If you want to do PPL I'm not sure if it is relevant.

In general an ATO is focused on ATPL, CPL, IR.
The DTO is restriced to PPL (and recently night rating)

If you want to do any of the things only an ATO is allowed go for an ATO. If not both are good.

And a school without either of the two certifications. This is speculation on my part but might they be restricted to either ULM or LAPL?
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Old 11th May 2020, 10:01
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Originally Posted by Archer4 View Post
There is a difference between an ATO and DTO. If you want to do PPL I'm not sure if it is relevant.

In general an ATO is focused on ATPL, CPL, IR.
The DTO is restriced to PPL (and recently night rating)

If you want to do any of the things only an ATO is allowed go for an ATO. If not both are good.

And a school without either of the two certifications. This is speculation on my part but might they be restricted to either ULM or LAPL?
I will eventually want to progress past the ppl so thatís good to know. Iím assuming theyíre not under those two as I couldnít find them in the CAA documents. They only offer PPL and LAPL so they could be a restricted one.
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Old 11th May 2020, 11:53
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TropicSeeker98

I just tried to reply to your PM but your inbox is full - you need to clear some space. Post here when you've done so and I'll be able to reply!
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Old 11th May 2020, 12:00
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Originally Posted by MrAverage View Post
TropicSeeker98

I just tried to reply to your PM but your inbox is full - you need to clear some space. Post here when you've done so and I'll be able to reply!
hey I donít know why it said that. I have nothing in my inbox 😂
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Old 11th May 2020, 16:23
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Ok. Try to ring me on 07941 three three seven four nine five
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Old 12th May 2020, 06:44
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Originally Posted by oggers View Post
There is a lot of good technical information in the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge. In summary I would say get your UK course material and focus on that. But in the meantime the PHAK is there to get you started and will remain a click away as a cross reference for those technical aspects that don't always make sense. For instance, you could definitely get a head start on things like aerodynamics and aircraft systems, but avoid the section on airspace which is not appropriate to the UK. Likewise the weather theory is generic but there is a weather services section that is mainly about a lot of excellent stuff that is not available in the UK.
If you want to get a head start, I'd agree with this. An aircraft flies the same in the States as it does here, so a lot of the information is common. I also finds it helps my comprehension to read this generic info from a couple of sources rather than going over a single source but I suppose that's horses for courses.
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Old 12th May 2020, 07:30
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Absorb as much information from every source. Aviation experience does not stop at the state of licence issue. It’s global.
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Old 12th May 2020, 10:20
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Hey @tropicalseeker98, would recommend with the theory - I'm in the same situation as you. I've started my theory with Pooley's books and they're very good. Other books I'd recommend is 'Stick and rudder' which gives a good insight on flight. I have some Pooley books actually - email me mubashar yasin at hotmail . com if you're interested, get rid of them cheap.

Following this forum. Would love to also know if there's other books and manuals that would help also.

Bash
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