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Do you mention amateur flying on your professional cv?

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Do you mention amateur flying on your professional cv?

Old 17th Jan 2020, 12:49
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Do you mention amateur flying on your professional cv?

Ok, here's a strange one.

If you were to apply for a leadership position in an 'applied academic/research' setting, would you refer to your flying qualifications/experience in an 'outside interests' section?!!

I see a lot of cv's, and people seem to put very dreary things in there - reading books and listening to music seems to be a common one! I personally would be impressed, as I guess most people here would, because it shows some diversity of interest and ability to stick at a task. But I wonder how 'normal' people, who have no idea what is involved in flying would react to such a statement? Maybe they would think I was a rich waster, or wonder why I am adding irrelevant stuff to an application for a serious position?

What do you reckon? Do any of you do this? If it matters, I am a Brit and preparing an application to a US organization and it is likely to be reviewed by American Academic 'suits'.

Last edited by double_barrel; 17th Jan 2020 at 18:23.
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Old 17th Jan 2020, 13:42
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Personally I would say yes ... anything that shows:
  • Ability to focus / learn new skills
  • Dedication
  • ...
Personally I include, as hobbies:
  • Sailing (Royal Yachting Association Yachtmaster Offshore)
  • Flying (Commercial Pilots Licence, Flying Instructor, Gliding Silver 'C')
  • Diving (PADI Rescue Diver)
All of which show focus over several years.

OC619

P.S. For you CV don't trust spell checker to catch everything ... "recon"
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Old 17th Jan 2020, 14:03
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Yes - I just tailor what and how I say it to the role.

G
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Old 17th Jan 2020, 14:05
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I have a minimal mention: "Leisure: travelling by plane and campervan, playing music". It is rarely entered upon during interviews, the one time my leisure activities were discussed it was when the interviewer had an interest common with mine (at that time), editing OpenStreetMap.

P.S. I heartily second OC619's PS. At least over here, spelling is rather important to first line recruiters, it is an easy sieve for them.
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Old 17th Jan 2020, 19:44
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I would suggest that concentrating on things like not using an apostrophe in "cv's" or littering your sentences with exclamation marks may be more likely to create the right impression.
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 03:47
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Originally Posted by MaxR View Post
I would suggest that concentrating on things like not using an apostrophe in "cv's" or littering your sentences with exclamation marks may be more likely to create the right impression.
Seriously!!!!!!!!!!!!!???????????

Thanks for your wise advice, but I suspect there is a difference between a post made from a phone via a web browser and a formal document !!!!!!!!

Last edited by double_barrel; 18th Jan 2020 at 07:16.
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 10:13
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You're welcome.
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 13:47
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I agree with both themes which have found their way into the replies. Yes, a brief mention of an unrelated skill or licensing achievement can add to the favourable impression the reader takes from your CV. The reference to flying on a CV should be brief, and not self aggrandizing, but enough that if the reader also happened to be a pilot, you now have something more in common.

And, I agree that unless the intent of a written passage is to deliberately convey a casual or humorous approach, its format, grammar and punctuation should be the best you can do. I consider a person's attention to detail in everything that they do. If they write with care, they will fly my plane with care, and apply care to the other things I might ask of them. If they're casual, the care I expect has not been demonstrated yet. Why pass up the opportunity to make the best first impression? I vigorously avoid "LOLs" and other abbreviations in my writing, and thy to either write out acronyms first, or use only those which I'm certain that the audience will understand.

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Old 18th Jan 2020, 14:23
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In academia I reckon it does not matter at all, maybe hurt to mention it. In industry and getting applications for leadership roles I welcome skills showing a certain basic knowledge on decision making, as a private pilot license.
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 17:12
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If you're a proper PPL, you should be able to mention it once on the CV, three times at the interview, daily (should you get the job), and as often as possible at all other times.
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 17:15
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Best not to mention it. But talking about the piano playing gigs in the brothel is OK.
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 17:22
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Originally Posted by Genghis the Engineer View Post
Yes - I just tailor what and how I say it to the role.

G
Me too. I once applied for a job in the ship building industry. I provided a brief summary of my flying in the "other skills" section of my CV. The interviewer was a keen PPL and most of the interview ended up talking about flying . I was offered the job but for a variety of reasons declined
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 17:23
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Originally Posted by clareprop View Post
If you're a proper PPL, you should be able to mention it once on the CV, three times at the interview, daily (should you get the job), and as often as possible at all other times.
Brilliant! Absolutely brilliant!



SND
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 17:27
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And what to do if one is an improper PPL?
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 19:48
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And what to do if one is an improper PPL
Explain why to the CAA/EASA/whoever...
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Old 19th Jan 2020, 08:57
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Originally Posted by OpenCirrus619 View Post
P.S. For you CV don't trust spell checker to catch everything ... "recon"
Your should always check you own work before your offer you advice to others!
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Old 19th Jan 2020, 11:36
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Originally Posted by Sir Niall Dementia View Post
Brilliant! Absolutely brilliant!



SND
Well.......I have to confess..........I was pax on a caravan the other day........it may have slipped out.....or the headset immediately plugged into the comms system may have given it away......

OTOH, no-one I work with knows about my secret flying activities.
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Old 19th Jan 2020, 13:49
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Wear your PPL wings to interview 😁
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Old 19th Jan 2020, 14:04
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Originally Posted by neilmac View Post
Wear your PPL wings to interview 😁
Or these?




But seriously, if I were to see a cv with a PPL (or indeed a YM offshore), I would know the candidate has some commitment and some ideas beyond their work and they would go up in my estimation. But I am not the target for my cv, and it is unlikely that anyone here is either. So I wondered if the 'what a w*****r' reactions would outweigh the 'he must be a decent chap' responses. I want the job and need all the help I can get!
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Old 19th Jan 2020, 14:40
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We seem to have strayed into 'how do you know there’s a pilot at your party?' territory...

I think a PPL is similar to, say, putting grade 8 piano on a CV - it does prove sustained effort over a long period. The only reason I’d omit it would be if I knew the interviewer would have a problem with it; e.g. they were a known Eco-warrior.
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