Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Non-Airline Forums > Private Flying
Reload this Page >

Flying with personal logbook

Private Flying LAA/BMAA/BGA/BPA The sheer pleasure of flight.

Flying with personal logbook

Old 28th Feb 2019, 08:02
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Enzed
Posts: 2,144
I was taught that because in the event of an accident they could be destroyed your logbook should never go with you when you fly as a pilot and an aircraft's logbooks must never travel in the aircraft they relate to. This might not be enshrined in any CAA/FAA rules but it sure makes sense to me.

By all means take copies if you must, but the originals stay at home. There is nothing in the rules I operate to that require a logbook to be carried.
27/09 is offline  
Old 28th Feb 2019, 08:10
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Zulu Time Zone
Posts: 589
Originally Posted by Level Attitude View Post
I agree there is no Regulation that requires the Personal Logbook to be carried on a flight; but I wanted to point out that if an LAPL Holder, or someone Flying to the LAPL privileges contained in another Licence, were asked to prove the validity of their LAPL privileges (on a flying tour of Europe for example) they would not be able to without it

The LAPL is different.

Take flying an SEP(Land) for example:

An ATPL, CPL or PPL will contain an SEP(L) Rating with a set expiry date. With the exception of the passenger carrying requirements, there are no experience/recency requirements at all to exercising the Rating's privileges within its two year validity. As long as they are within the Rating validity date (marked on the Licence which does have to be carried) they are legal and it is irrelevant how current/good/bad they are.

An LAPL for SEP(Land) contains no Rating. It permits, by itself, to fly an SEP(L). The LAPL is valid for life BUT contains experience requirements that must have been met in the two years prior to each and every flight in which the pilot exercises those privileges (Ref: Part-FCL.140.A LAPL(A) - Recency requirements)
...and I am pointing out that the other licences you mention do actually have recency requirements, with or without pax. For a start all FAA pilots must do a BFR. Secondly, every IF rated pilot has currency requirements. If this is about showing recency the LAPL is not unique. So what have you not yet mentioned that makes it so?



oggers is offline  
Old 28th Feb 2019, 08:14
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Zulu Time Zone
Posts: 589
Originally Posted by 27/09 View Post
By all means take copies if you must, but the originals stay at home. There is nothing in the rules I operate to that require a logbook to be carried.
There it is. An answer to the question that is practical, correct, and doesn't invent implied regulations.
oggers is offline  
Old 28th Feb 2019, 13:41
  #24 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 659
If this is about showing recency the LAPL is not unique. So what have you not yet mentioned that makes it so?
My apologies, as LAPL is an EASA Licence I should have said: "An EASA ATPL, EASA CPL or EASA PPL will contain an SEP(L) Rating with a set expiry date....."

LAPL privileges are unique in EASA as, once obtained, they depend solely on meeting the recency requirements (before every flight) to exercise them (plus valid relevant medical of course).
Level Attitude is offline  
Old 28th Feb 2019, 14:21
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Cardiff, UK
Age: 57
Posts: 1,195
Its a real faf for licensing purposes if logbooks are lost these days. The CAA "lost logbook" procedure now requires (amongst other things) 2 interviews (100+/time), in-between which you need 'proof" from flight club of hours from aircraft rentals. (Someone should tell the CAA not everyone hires).

For that reason, my logbooks now stay at home.
Mariner9 is offline  
Old 1st Mar 2019, 00:10
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Enzed
Posts: 2,144
Originally Posted by ChickenHouse View Post
Experience from field ramp checks is different. If you are standing next to your aircraft, want to board with a fellow and get ramp checked, they will ask you to prove FCL.060 Recent Experience 90 days to document legally being allowed to take the passenger. Some checkers may accept an electronic version of the personal logbook, but many won't. As long as FCL does not explicitly allow electronic versions of logbook (electronic document according to common rules of bookkeeping - no alterations possible, non cheatable, certified as originals, all that complex stuff for electronic databases/programs) I stay paper.

And yes, I have been at ramp checks where they forbid the flight until landings without the passenger had been done in front of the checkers. Pretty nasty if you are on an IFR flight at a slotted airport, so I decided, even after carrying is not a legal requirement at first glance, to always have it ready to show in paper. Paper is something an ordinary ramp check agent is able to understand, not sure this is valid for electronic versions. Yes, I do keep an electronic copy for convenience and by treating the paper version as original I get free of the 'common bookkeeping standards'.
I would suggest the person conducting the ramp check was either usurping their authority or was looking for a backhander.

I agree with Good Business Sense
27/09 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.