Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Non-Airline Forums > Private Flying
Reload this Page >

Microlight Tailwheel Training

Private Flying LAA/BMAA/BGA/BPA The sheer pleasure of flight.

Microlight Tailwheel Training

Reply

Old 7th Jan 2019, 09:26
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Great Britain
Posts: 3
Microlight Tailwheel Training

Hello, does anyone know a tailwheel microlight instructor in the southern half of the UK that has their own aircraft available?

I currently fly a Nosewheel Microlight and would like to try out tailwheel, so would be good if I could fit it into my Biennial hours tuition.
Hyperdark is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jan 2019, 08:57
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 13,485
This is a known problem. I seriously have considered buying something like a TST simply to be able to provide tailwheel training to microlight pilots.

I think that Saxon microlights at North Weald might still have a tailwheel Thruster, but can't think of anybody else.

You might get what you want on the other hand from an hour in something tailwheel at the lighter end of SEP. White Waltham's Super Cubs are fun with some good instructors.

G
Genghis the Engineer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jan 2019, 20:08
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: River Thames & Surrey
Age: 70
Posts: 7,776
I admire your guts. After years of nosewheel aircraft I tried to check out in a TST with different instructors at Halton and Popham; could never get the landing right.
chevvron is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jan 2019, 20:58
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Moray,Scotland,U.K.
Posts: 1,278
For tailwheel you need a good instructor who is regularly flying tailwheel. Not an instructor with only a few hours tailwheel, and not current on them.
Maoraigh1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jan 2019, 21:58
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: River Thames & Surrey
Age: 70
Posts: 7,776
Several types of TMG have tailwheels eg Grob 109.
chevvron is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jan 2019, 22:47
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 13,485
Originally Posted by chevvron View Post
I admire your guts. After years of nosewheel aircraft I tried to check out in a TST with different instructors at Halton and Popham; could never get the landing right.
I can't say that I've ever found them all that difficult, but I flew my first solo in a Spectrum, which isn't all that different. Perhaps familiarity has a lot to do with it. Most pilots probably find the aeroplane they first learned on the most comfortable... I took a long time getting to grips with the PA28 a few years later!

G
Genghis the Engineer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10th Jan 2019, 11:23
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Here
Posts: 1,684
Tailwheel planes (and landing techniques) are 'broadly' similar - the advice to go in a cub (or even a Tiger Moth) is good.
Sam Rutherford is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 11th Jan 2019, 03:18
  #8 (permalink)  
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Age: 57
Posts: 3,834
Tailwheel planes (and landing techniques) are 'broadly' similar - the advice to go in a cub (or even a Tiger Moth) is good.
Agreed. I've only flown one "lighter than certified" tailwheel airplane, it was single place, so I had to train myself. In hind sight, I can say that heavier taildraggers may be a little more stable, and easier to learn on. Lighter airplanes can change direction faster, so you must be more alert. Also, instruction you may find in a certified taildragger has a greater chance of being more experienced, simply because the certified taildragger is probably more costly, and insured with an insurer who takes more interest in who's doing the training in it.

Do not be afraid of taildraggers. They demand more attention from their pilot, particularly in directional control on the ground, and you must decide what type of landing you are doing, or the taildragger will decide for you, and it won't be pretty. As long as you tell the taildragger who's boss, and keep flying it with purpose until it's parked, you'll be fine.
Pilot DAR is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 15th Jan 2019, 09:36
  #9 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Great Britain
Posts: 3
Originally Posted by Genghis the Engineer View Post
This is a known problem. I seriously have considered buying something like a TST simply to be able to provide tailwheel training to microlight pilots.

I think that Saxon microlights at North Weald might still have a tailwheel Thruster, but can't think of anybody else.

You might get what you want on the other hand from an hour in something tailwheel at the lighter end of SEP. White Waltham's Super Cubs are fun with some good instructors.

G
Thankyou Genghis, but Saxon are no longer offering training
It seems microlight tailwheel training is to all intents and purposes non existent in the UK and I will have to look at difference training on an SEP type.
Hyperdark is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 15th Jan 2019, 12:43
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 13,485
Here's a thought - try emailing the BMAA office, the man you want is Aaron Bliss, their instructors administrator. See if either he knows of somebody delivering tailwheel training, or he's prepared to send a note out on one of his periodic "all instructors" emails asking if somebody can help you out?

(If you can get somebody to lend you a Thruster, I could probably help you out, but I don't have a suitable aeroplane at present myself.)

G
Genghis the Engineer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 15th Jan 2019, 19:08
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: EBZH
Posts: 2,346
It would be easy enough - and not overly expensive, either - to get tuition on a tailwheel ultralight over here in BE - plenty of Rans S6's at EBBZ Buzet, to name only one field among several - but I reckon you are mainly after a UK valid sign-off? May need to hurry, though, March 30 is approaching ominously fast!
Jan Olieslagers is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 15th Jan 2019, 19:13
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Here
Posts: 1,684
Any sign-off is okay. Nationality, registration etc. are not relevant...
Sam Rutherford is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jan 2019, 11:37
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 13,485
Microlights don't formally need tailwheel differences training, indeed: so it is just about getting competent - no signature required from anybody.

G
Genghis the Engineer is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service