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Beagle Pup 150 fuel burn

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Beagle Pup 150 fuel burn

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Old 13th Jul 2018, 15:31
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Beagle Pup 150 fuel burn

Hi all,

Apologies if Im posting this in the wrong place but I was wondering if anyone had a rough ball park figure I could use to work out the litres per hour fuel burn of a series 2 Beagle Pup 150. I know this figure can vary based on several factors but I just need a rough figure to do a back of the fag packet hourly cost calculation.

From a bit of digging on google I came up with a figure of about 24 litres an hour - not sure how accurate that is though hence the question on here.

Many thanks in advance
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Old 13th Jul 2018, 15:48
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More like 7 Imp Gal (32 litres) an hour. I've not flown the 100hp, but 24 litres an hour could be for that?

DH
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Old 14th Jul 2018, 15:10
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Many thanks for the quick reply!
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Old 14th Jul 2018, 15:37
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I used to have a share in a Pup Series 2. From memory, it did roughly 6.5 Imp gal/hour - say 30 litres/hr. Just don't trust the fuel guages!
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 12:25
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When I had a share in a 150hp Pup I did some tests running using 1 tank only for cruise.
Running at the best economy cruise RPM, with the engine properly leaned, you would get pretty much bang on 2 hours endurance to empty,
which does match the ideal 24l/hr you have, but you'd be much better using the ~30l/hr quoted above if you are trying to work out a reasonable hourly fuel cost for real world use.
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 13:22
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Originally Posted by asyncio View Post
When I had a share in a 150hp Pup I did some tests running using 1 tank only for cruise.
Running at the best economy cruise RPM, with the engine properly leaned, you would get pretty much bang on 2 hours endurance to empty,
which does match the ideal 24l/hr you have, but you'd be much better using the ~30l/hr quoted above if you are trying to work out a reasonable hourly fuel cost for real world use.
Thanks for the excellent reply asyncio! I agree whole heartly with this!

Basically, I’m strongly considering purchasing a share so that I can get back to regularly flying light aircraft as I haven’t had chance to do much in the last 6yrs that I’ve been working in the airlines.

As possel states above, I would never trust the fuel gauges (actually in my previous experience of single engine aircraft I don’t recall them ever being very accurate regardless of type) so I would definitely use 30ltrs/hr for flight planning/endurance figure as well as initial cost estimate, but then try and operate the aircraft in the most efficient way (consult performance section of POH and fly the aircraft on the numbers as much as possible).

Any other advice would be greatly appreciated!
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 15:38
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I'de definitely take a share an a Pup over something like a PA28 or C172 any day, unless you needed the extra seats.
It's way more fun to fly, particularly if you are looking for something as an escape from your day job.

Overall the aircraft is pretty bombproof, apart from the doors which are notoriously easy to bend out of shape if you lean on them when getting in and out.
So don't be overly concerned if the share you are looking at has slightly ill fitting ones. The locking mechanism itself is solid, so they won't pop open in flight like some Cessnas have a reputation for doing.

However like all older and rarer aircraft, if something does break you might have a bit more trouble getting spares. But since you are buying a share in a established group they will already know all the right people.
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 16:51
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32 litres an hour in ours.
Lovely aeroplane to fly. We regret selling it, but ours was a bit special.
A classic aircraft.
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 21:19
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I had a share in one for a number of years 33lph is about right at 105kn 3000ft. Bits are getting very hard to find so expect it to be grounded from time to time. A delight to fly, but limited range and relatively expensive to run. Are you planing on aerobating it? If not then something like a Jodel DR1050 will do the same job on 21lph with no spare issues and much lower running costs on a permit.
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Old 16th Jul 2018, 01:04
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Planning to use it more for the occasional bimble out and about in the UK - as was earlier stated it’s a much sweeter handling machine than any Cessna or Piper (I have flown a Pup before several years ago).
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Old 16th Jul 2018, 09:42
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Originally Posted by Rod1 View Post
I had a share in one for a number of years 33lph is about right at 105kn 3000ft. Bits are getting very hard to find so expect it to be grounded from time to time. A delight to fly, but limited range and relatively expensive to run. Are you planing on aerobating it? If not then something like a Jodel DR1050 will do the same job on 21lph with no spare issues and much lower running costs on a permit.
Rod1
Please note that you could also get something with similar performance and handling with a Rotax 900 series engine and use only 11 -15 lph (unleaded).
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