Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Non-Airline Forums > Private Flying
Reload this Page >

Wear your sunglasses chaps

Private Flying LAA/BMAA/BGA/BPA The sheer pleasure of flight.

Wear your sunglasses chaps

Old 28th Apr 2016, 09:03
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Under the clag EGKA
Posts: 978
Wear your sunglasses chaps

Having my cataracts done. Eye doctor said that flying without sunglasses was a cause in pilots. Infra red apparently not UV.
effortless is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 09:05
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hampshire
Posts: 386
If you're blue eyed even more necessary.
Capt Kremmen is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 10:11
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: norfolk
Posts: 82
Interesting.
If you don`t mind me asking effortless, what type of lenses are you going for?
mothminor is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 11:16
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: UK
Age: 75
Posts: 1,064
Sunglasses can be a seriously bad idea when flying, especially the polarised and tinted
varieties.
They can compromise the ability to see conflicting traffic and other hazards.

Rather go for good quality neutral coloured photochromics which will automatically adjust to the ambient light levels.
The Ancient Geek is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 12:40
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: UK,Twighlight Zone
Posts: 7,255
Sunglasses can be a seriously bad idea when flying, especially the polarised and tinted
varieties.
Blimey, nearly 10,000hrs on my polarised Maiu Jims so far. I had no idea I have been doing it wrong for so long....
S-Works is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 12:51
  #6 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Under the clag EGKA
Posts: 978
Bog standard distance. Assessed yesterday, being done next Wednesday. NHS, I have to be grateful. Annoying thing is my really expensive distance glasses will be useless now.
effortless is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 14:31
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: norfolk
Posts: 82
Thanks effortless,
I`ve a cataract in my left eye which is not yet bad enough for nhs treatment.
I either wait or spend lots of dosh.
My optition also mentioned high numbers of pilots with cataracts.
Hope all goes well with your op. (very routine, so I`m told).
mothminor is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 16:28
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,239
There's UV protection in plastic lenses; so eyeglass wearers get a good deal of protection.

Don't know of any studies on prevalence of cataracts in various populations.

Age and diabetes seem to be major factors.

My ophthalmologist tells me mine are not yet worth operating on.
RatherBeFlying is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 16:31
  #9 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Under the clag EGKA
Posts: 978
My mate is better than me but they are doing his because it affects his work. He fnds reading in lowish light very difficult. It is worth stressing things like this.
effortless is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 20:12
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Aberdeen
Posts: 43
Afaik CAA discourage the use of both polarised and photochromic lenses by pilots. There is a CAA paper on it.
nkt2000 is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2016, 22:00
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Enzed
Posts: 2,224
bose-x: Blimey, nearly 10,000hrs on my polarised Maiu Jims so far. I had no idea I have been doing it wrong for so long....
Polarised lenses can be an issue with some windscreens as some screens, due to their construction, (usually on commercial aircraft) have a polarising effect and the other issue is some cockpit displays also polarise the light that is transmitted. Couple these with a polarised lense and then you have a potential problem.

No doubt you've seen the effect of placing one polarised lense over another and rotating them.

Photochromic lenses need direct sunlight to darken. They are not very effective when sitting out of direct sunlight (like you normally are in a cockpit) looking out into bright sunny skies.
27/09 is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2016, 07:51
  #12 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Under the clag EGKA
Posts: 978
To be clear, I asked about sunglasses and the specialist said that cataracts more prevalent in people who didn't wear them when needed. Also, I asked about UV as I had prolonged exposure. He said that it was infra red that caused cataracts. So, this should be remembered when choosing.

If you are considering whether to go private. You can choose a varifocal private and you can get them done when the symptoms aren't so florid. These appear to be the only advantages. At the moment, the NHS is very quick when they agree you need them. The quality of the work is excellent and you have all the resources of the NHS if it all goes tits up.
effortless is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2016, 08:36
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: London
Age: 51
Posts: 127
im 47. always worn sunglasses flying, driving, just when out and about and the best one I could get my hands on at that. Been told by optician I have very mild cataracts in each eye. Don't do enough flying for that to be the cause, guess its just one of those things. its a bugger. not so long ago I was 4 in each eye, now I am 6 and can really tell the difference!!
Camargue is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2016, 10:38
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lancashire & Florida
Posts: 122
Most of my flying is in Florida, I couldn't face flying without wearing sunglasses, never had any bad experiences regarding spotting other traffic.
alland2012 is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2016, 13:04
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: UK
Age: 74
Posts: 232
There are three types of lens replacement for cataracts, the NHS only fit the cheapest and under NHS rules you can not make a cash contribution to any NHS treatment by law. Therefore if you want the best new lenses, work like natural lenses for focusing you have to pay for the complete operation which will be over 2000 each eye.

I believe on sunglasses for flying a brown/gold tint is the best as we are more sensitive to black/yellow contrasts than black white that is why wasp/bees and other nasty things are these colours see and avoid rule.
horizon flyer is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2016, 13:11
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Glasgow
Age: 36
Posts: 644
With many plexiglass cockpits, polarised glasses cause you to see a rainbow like effect, which makes it harder to see outside, as well as the problems with a fair number of digital instruments (polarised light is used in LCD technology) where tilting your head could stop you reading a screen (even if you can read it when your head is straight).
Also as someone else above says, photochromic doesn't get dark enough as the plexiglass blocks most of the particular frequency that causes the colour change.
Coloured lenses block out certain colours, so can reduce the chances of your eye picking out something in that colour, so neutral grey has been shown to allow the best lookout.

Beyond that, optical quality of the lens will also make a big difference.

I find graduated lenses work well for me - darker at the top, as it lets me have good brightess reduction while still being able to clearly read instruments.
riverrock83 is offline  
Old 30th Apr 2016, 16:14
  #17 (permalink)  
GipsyMagpie
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by The Ancient Geek View Post
Sunglasses can be a seriously bad idea when flying
I'll remember that next time I fly and try to look into sun for traffic.
 
Old 30th Apr 2016, 19:38
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Leeds
Posts: 54
Originally Posted by effortless View Post
To be clear, I asked about sunglasses and the specialist said that cataracts more prevalent in people who didn't wear them when needed. Also, I asked about UV as I had prolonged exposure. He said that it was infra red that caused cataracts. So, this should be remembered when choosing.

If you are considering whether to go private. You can choose a varifocal private and you can get them done when the symptoms aren't so florid. These appear to be the only advantages. At the moment, the NHS is very quick when they agree you need them. The quality of the work is excellent and you have all the resources of the NHS if it all goes tits up.
Pay special attention to the CAA medical regulations on acceptable lens implants. Multi focal lenses may not be acceptable for EASA medical certification. See the regulations here and discuss with your AME!
http://www.caa.co.uk/Aeromedical-Examiners/Medical-standards/Pilots-(EASA)/Conditions/Visual/Guidance-following-eye-surgery/
A le Ron is offline  
Old 30th Apr 2016, 22:49
  #19 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Under the clag EGKA
Posts: 978
Thanks Ron but I lost my medical quite a while ago so not a problem for me.
effortless is offline  
Old 1st May 2016, 00:15
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 2,179
via Camargue:
im 47. always worn sunglasses flying, driving, just when out and about and the best one I could get my hands on at that. Been told by optician I have very mild cataracts in each eye. Don't do enough flying for that to be the cause, guess its just one of those things. its a bugger. not so long ago I was 4 in each eye, now I am 6 and can really tell the difference!!
I'm told that if the sunglasses you wear dont have full sun blocking top and side coverage around the lenses that wearing a cap or hat is recomended.
Flying Binghi is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.