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PPL groundschool on your own

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PPL groundschool on your own

Old 23rd Jan 2013, 23:37
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PPL groundschool on your own

If you were to study PPL subjects on your own, how would you plan everything? How would you allocate all the subjects over the days?
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 00:05
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I started revising for exams before starting lessons, but did my exams during my PPL. The dilemma is that if you know the theory, you get more out of the lessons, but some of the subjects make more sense after you've started flying. I started with the topics I already knew best (human factors, aircraft systems) then worked my way through the more straightforward ones (performance and planning, for me as I'm fairly numerate and remembered some of the physics). I also did air law relatively early, as many schools require this prior to your first solo.

How are you planning to structure your PPL? I did mine intensively, which changed how I approached revision as I tried to get to grips with most subjects before starting. I also used airquiz.com a lot to identify gaps in my knowledge.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 00:23
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I want to get my PPL in order to start studying ATPL theory as soon as possible 'cause due to several problems I had to delay everything.
I am thinking about getting an EASA PPL in Florida so that I can also fly in weekends - that would not be possible with a FAA PPL.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 02:02
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PPL groundschool on your own

My advice with PPL study is take your time with it and really soak up the information as its a good base to work from when it comes to your ATPLs. Understand and visualise each aspect and like the above poster has mentioned subjects like NAV is easier to grasp once you have started flying
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 09:53
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I am thinking about getting an EASA PPL in Florida so that I can also fly in weekends - that would not be possible with a FAA PPL.
Why can you not fly on weekends with a FAA PPL?

Last edited by Slopey; 24th Jan 2013 at 09:54.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 11:08
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Hello Red Bull,

I am a student too and have passed three of my exams by studying on my own in the following way:
  • This is controversial I know, but for me, leaving all the ground study until nearing the end of flying training is working best. I started background reading Air Law and of course the basics of principles during my early training.
  • I took my first exam - Met - (and passed) in September 2012 having been training since May 10. Leaving the exams until now means that I understand the thoeyr mnore and how it relates to flying. This is particulalry useful with Aircraft Tech which I am studying at the moment.
  • Planning study? Well, I study at weekends, evenings after work and lunchtimes. it really depends on how you want to use your time and what other pressures are on your time. I am lucky as I don't have any family so my own time is literally just that!
  • I took Met first as it was interesting and my FI suggested it, then Air Law to get it out of the way, then Comms as I love RT and now Aircraft tech which is my worst subject to get it out of the way.
But really, its up to you an how you work. best thing to do is to chat to your FI and see what they want you to do!

Whatever you do, good luck!
GQ
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 12:41
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Its difficult to answer the question - there really isn't a straightforward answer because it depends so much on how you learn. Practical, hands on person? - leave until later. Good at exams and academic? - get them done early. But generally I'd advise leaving them until you've done enough flying to understand the relevance of what you are learning for the exams, because most of it is stuff you really do need to know (there are exceptions to this and a good chance this thread will drift into a discussion of how useless most of it is...).

But ask your instructor. Just because you want to study on your own they aren't going to wash their hands of that part of your training.

There's nothing wrong with doing most of the studying yourself and getting your instructor to give you an hour or two of ground school to help with bits that you are finding challenging. Sort of guided self-study. In fact its what most of my students do.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 12:55
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You had better be quick!
AMC1 FCL.210; FCL.215 SYLLABUS OF THEORETICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR THE PPL(A) AND PPL(H) The following tables contain the syllabi for the courses of theoretical knowledge, as well as for the theoretical knowledge examinations for the PPL(A) and PPL(H). The training and examination should cover aspects related to non-technical skills in an integrated manner, taking into account the particular risks associated to the licence and the activity. An approved course shall comprise at least 100 hours of theoretical knowledge instruction. This theoretical knowledge instruction provided by the ATO should include a certain element of formal classroom work but may include also such facilities as interactive video, slide or tape presentation, computer-based training and other media distance learning courses. The training organisation responsible for the training has to check if all the appropriate elements of the training course of theoretical knowledge instruction have been completed to a satisfactory standard before recommending the applicant for the examination.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 14:39
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Why can you not fly on weekends with a FAA PPL?
Because I live in Europe, and as far as I am concerned there are no N-registered aircraft nearby where I live. Also, that's why I am interested in a JAA/EASA PPL package in America. I can't afford to wait for six months for an examiner here in Italy...
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 15:32
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Not sure about Italy, but in the UK (until EASA screw it all up) you can fly a G-reg on an FAA PPL iirc so it wouldn't necessarily stop you flying. (But then having an FAA PPL might be a pest for the BFR - it would depend if you want an FAA or an EASA CPL/ME/IR at the end of it I guess).

There are options in Spain and elsewhere I believe with equally good weather - you don't need to go to FL necessarily to do an EASA PPL.

When I did the exams, I did Human Performance first which I found to be quite easy. Then Air Law, which was a memory job, then the others. I left Nav and Met until last - I found doing XCs and proper navigation in the aircraft (and preparing plogs etc), was beneficial to the exam as I understood how it worked practically, rather than just trying to do it from the textbooks.

Last edited by Slopey; 24th Jan 2013 at 15:35.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 16:58
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but in the UK (until EASA screw it all up) you can fly a G-reg on an FAA PPL
But only on an Annex II aeroplane. To fly an EASA aeroplane you now need a validation. It all changed in the last ANO amendment!
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 18:39
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You had better be quick!
So, how quick do you think they really need to be?

Some recent threads suggest not very quick!
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 18:54
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If yo go to an ATO its already too late as they will be approved to EASA standards. If you go to an existing RF you have until April 2015.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 18:58
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Which books set would you suggest me to buy? I currently have on my computer installed PPL CBT's by Oxford but the previous edition - Transair/Oxford. I love them, all the cores are explained clearly.
Would they still be a reliable source of study with new OAA PPL books?

I don't want to use a monitor to study but only as a support...

Last edited by RedBullGaveMeWings; 24th Jan 2013 at 18:59.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 19:48
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But generally I'd advise leaving them until you've done enough flying to understand the relevance of what you are learning for the exams, because most of it is stuff you really do need to know....
Absolutely agree, its working for me!!!

But ask your instructor. Just because you want to study on your own they aren't going to wash their hands of that part of your training. .....

There's nothing wrong with doing most of the studying yourself and getting your instructor to give you an hour or two of ground school to help with bits that you are finding challenging.
Totally agree with this too! My instructor have many text/phone/after flying discussions about Ground study! Its invaluable and I couldn't do it without!

As to books, I use the Jeremy Pratt series and have the Pooleys Air Pilots manuals for RT and Aircraft tech as well as the Pratt series, as I find the Pooleys books even better at explanations than Pratt. Though this is just personal choice.....

Well, having said that, better get on with some study!

GQ
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 20:38
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Read the books until you understand them and do the online exam questions.
Draw wind triangles and twirl the whizzwheel until the answers tally every time and you can do it in a couple of minutes with absolute certainty. Buy a chart and understand every symbol and aspect of it.
When you can do that you will pass easily.
It is that simple. Read, read, read.
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Old 25th Jan 2013, 10:06
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Originally Posted by Whopity
It all changed in the last ANO amendment!
Ahh - was wondering if it was through already or not. So noted.
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