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Why no regular use of CO detectors in light aircraft?

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Why no regular use of CO detectors in light aircraft?

Old 6th Jan 2013, 22:16
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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The CO danger surely comes from either a badly placed exhaust (which is rare as it then shouldn't be certified / permitted) or through the cabin heating system via a crack in the exhaust, with the exhaust fumes getting into the muffler.

If the plane has a water cooled engine then the cabin heating can come off a water pipe, rather than the exhaust, and so the danger is much reduced. Therefore no real need for a CO detector.

What sort of planes have you been flying?
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Old 6th Jan 2013, 22:38
  #22 (permalink)  
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Riverrock83, if that was for me, I did the first half of my PPL on the Grob G115A, the second on the PA28-161 Warrior II.
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Old 7th Jan 2013, 05:25
  #23 (permalink)  
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We also use a B&Q CO detector. Even had it go off once at very low CO level so nice to know it works and is VERY loud. Fortunately wasn't a structural exhaust problem, but a particular vicious sideslip to the right whilst "keeping it tight" to beat the incoming queue of CAT and avoid 20mins in the hold. Must have been just a tiny amount of exhaust gas gone in through the right-hand wing vent. A chemical detector wouldn't even have registered it.

Last edited by Shunter; 7th Jan 2013 at 05:25.
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Old 7th Jan 2013, 20:41
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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and possibly ac with no cabin air heat exchangers on the exhaust pipes.
CO from the exhaust can be sucked into the fuselage at any underside hatch which is not airtight, and build up over time. The most sensitive place for the CO monitor in our Jodel was the rear seat. When moved to the heater air entry, it stopped bleeping. The underfuselage access hatch was not properly sealed. It took over 90 minutes to trigger the alarm.
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Old 7th Jan 2013, 21:03
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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I can't help asking if the maintenance is being done properly ?

In thirty years of maintenance I have yet to see one of the aircraft maintained by any of the companies that I worked for have a problem.

I would suggest that some of you look at the fasteners on your aircraft exhaust system and mak a judgment as to if the exhaust system has been removed for inspection.

I am not objecting to CO detectors just saying that prevention ( by correct maintenance) is better than cure.
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Old 20th Jan 2013, 20:26
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
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What about this One

Fireangel CO-9D Digital Sealed for Life Carbon Monoxide Alarm:Amazon:DIY & Tools Fireangel CO-9D Digital Sealed for Life Carbon Monoxide Alarm:Amazon:DIY & Tools

"http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B00441S9GS"

Last edited by kevkdg; 20th Jan 2013 at 20:31.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 20:18
  #27 (permalink)  
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kevkdg, your link is broken.

We had a brief (~10-15 min?) indication of CO on my skills test flight (I had taken one of the small chemical type detectors I had purchased). The spot turned dark, and then back to normal after fresh air vents were opened. It was suspected that it could be due to the airplane having been refueled, does anyone know if these things are sensitive to avgas fumes?

There is a warning on the back of the product saying it should not be exposed to halogens, ammoniac or nitrous gases. Any ideas if any of these are present in avgas?

If these detectors are susceptible to being set off by avgas, I think it would be worthwhile to invest in a powered detector instead, as they tend to be less reliant on chemical reactions to pick up on CO.

I've considered this one, linked earlier by cct:

Amazon Amazon

The only thing I'd be concerned about is the distraction that the alarm could cause if it were to go off. I use a similar one in my home, and the alarm is extremely loud - I certainly wouldn't appreciate it going off right next to me in a cockpit, as it could cause a dangerous distraction. There is also the issue of mounting. I'd be happy just to stick some velcro on there and have it stuck to the panel or something - however all my flying will be in rented airplanes and I doubt the owners would appreciate sticky residue (from the velcro) all over the panel.

Is there anything designed specifically for use in GA, other than the Aeromedix one (which is way out of my budget)?

Would appreciate any feedback.

Thanks

Odai.
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Old 24th Jan 2013, 22:54
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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the alarm is extremely loud - I certainly wouldn't appreciate it going off right next to me in a cockpit, as it could cause a dangerous distraction
Try listening out for it while wearing headphones and with an engine running 5 feet from your ears.

FBW
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Old 25th Jan 2013, 06:33
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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We have one of these.

It's nice and compact and has a 7 year battery. The sounder is just the right volume once you've got your headset on and engine running.
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Old 25th Jan 2013, 10:14
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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the alarm is extremely loud - I certainly wouldn't appreciate it going off right next to me in a cockpit, as it could cause a dangerous distraction
I'd rather have the distraction, than a unnoticed transition into unconsciousness and loss of control.

They are loud for a reason, and most of them have a silence button. The point is you KNOW you're in trouble.

Last edited by Slopey; 25th Jan 2013 at 10:15.
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Old 27th Jan 2013, 15:44
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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CO monitor

I have the FireAngel one, in my case via Screwfix (check stock, then go & collect or have delivered). Amazon might be more competitive, tho...

FireAngel 7 Year Digital CO Alarm | Screwfix.com

I have to confess that mine was bought for home use, but I'll take with me from now on when flying!

RF
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Old 27th Jan 2013, 23:09
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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I intend to fit one of these in my LAA type:

Aero 455 Family
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Old 28th Jan 2013, 01:29
  #33 (permalink)  
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Thanks for the responses guys.

The FireAngel one looks nicely compact, any ideas if this kind of detector would also be susceptible by avgas?

Can I ask also how people are mounting these things in the airplane?

I cannot use any permanent mounting method as I'd only be hiring group aircraft.
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Old 28th Jan 2013, 19:54
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Our one is usually on the rear seat- which is near to where CO from the exhausts can get into a Jodel 1050. The ideal place would be near your face. Buy a pilot's shirt - it'll have attachment points on each shoulder to which it can be fixed.
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