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-   -   Plane crash at Orange Airport (https://www.pprune.org/pacific-general-aviation-questions/608877-plane-crash-orange-airport.html)

Desert Flower 15th May 2018 12:05

Plane crash at Orange Airport
 
A light plane has crashed at Orange Regional Airport.

Two people are being treated for serious burns to their head and hands after the plane crashed about 7pm.

A male and female, both aged in their 40s, are in critical conditions and are being airlifted to Sydney’s Royal North Shore Hospital.

The woman has been flown by NSW Ambulance helicopter and the man will be taken in a second helicopter.

Seven NSW Ambulance road crews also attended the scene.

According to local rural fire service, Canobolas Zone NSW RFS, the plane caught fire.

“Brigades are on scene as a light plane has come down at Orange Airport causing it to catch fire. The occupants have been released and transported to hospital. Police, Ambulance and FRNSW are also on scene,” the RFS said.

DF.

nonsense 15th May 2018 12:38

https://www.centralwesterndaily.com....-photos-video/
https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/...15-p4zfi7.html

Desert Flower 15th May 2018 13:08

FlightAware shows a SR22 landing at YORG earlier in the day - VH-SGS.

DF.

cstleon 15th May 2018 13:59

Looks more like VH-PDC. Thoughts and prayers with the occupants.

Desert Flower 15th May 2018 14:30


Originally Posted by cstleon (Post 10147416)
Looks more like VH-PDC. Thoughts and prayers with the occupants.

Looking at the tracking for that aircraft, I concur. Owned by INTACT AVIATION PTY LTD.

DF.

Propstop 16th May 2018 03:34

Orange light plane crash pilot and instructor were testing aircraft before crash - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
The ABC have got the pic wrong, a Cirrus does not look like an Aztec!

Desert Flower 16th May 2018 03:54


Originally Posted by Propstop (Post 10147923)

Even though that Aztec looks a bit banged up I still reckon the occupants got out in better condition than those in the Cirrus!

DF.

triton140 16th May 2018 04:49

I think Catherine Fitzsimons was the pilot in the CASA Out 'N Back videos ...

Alpha Whiskey Bravo 16th May 2018 06:59


I think Catherine Fitzsimons was the pilot in the CASA Out 'N Back videos ..
Yes that is correct. I hope they both have a speedy recovery.

AWB

Ethel the Aardvark 17th May 2018 00:37

Hope the first responders did not put themselves at risk with the old exploding parachute trick.

KRviator 17th May 2018 01:13

Would any of them really know A) It's a Cirrus that's down, and B) The Cirrus (Cirrus's/Cirri?!?) are fitted with a BRS?

LeadSled 17th May 2018 02:33

Folks,
It has been claimed that that terrible accident at Orange occurred because they were doing a biennial flight review at night.
As we know, in the past this has not been required – it only came in with Part 61 – and it is not required in other countries in the world.

Is this evidence of CASA rules ending up with a serious accident, where people have been burnt and could have resulted in fatalities?

This should be looked at.

Tootle pip!!

Squawk7700 17th May 2018 03:04

I call bollocks.

The aircraft didn't know it was dark.

Was the aircraft still being flown VFR?

How did the darkness cause the crash assuming that at least the instructor was suitably rated / endorsed?

topdrop 17th May 2018 12:28


occurred because they were doing a biennial flight review at night.
Make up your mind:
  • It's not dangerous to fly at night and you don't need a Night VFR endorsement, ala USA or;
  • It is dangerous to fly at night and you need a Night VFR endorsement ala Oz; or
  • It is dangerous to fly at night and you don't need a Night VFR endorsement - based on the above and your other statements

Seagull201 17th May 2018 13:09

feedback....

It's dangerous to fly at night in any single engine aircraft.

Any night flying and the Night Visual Rating, should be done in a twin, with an instructor only and night circuits should be icus only.

Night flying in a single engine turbine seems to be reliable at the moment.

Everyone is aware that night circuit training at a capital city airport,, shouldn't be done in a single,
as there's too much residential area around.

Correct me if i'm wrong, the news article about the Orange accident mentioned, the aircraft veered
off the runway to the right on landing and caught fire, the training pilot pulled the instructor out of aircraft in the last
moment and saved their life.

There was talk the runway lights went out during landing but the aerodrome cameras confirmed, the
lights stayed on.

Both pilots were burnt and injured.

Hope both persons can recover and live a normal life.

mostlytossas 17th May 2018 15:26

You joke I trust☺

Seagull201 17th May 2018 15:43

I'm referring to general aviation flying training at night.

I'm sure you're quite qualified to do a forced landing at night time and land on a highway, over a residential area and walk away from the aircraft uninjured.

Only if you're superman.

I'm sure it feels wonderful, flying in a single over terrain such as Katoomba at night.

At least in a twin gives an added safety factor.

When a single runs into a house a night whilst conducting circuits, rules will change in a heartbeat.

i'm not CASA mister, it's up to them, so don't panic.

slats11 17th May 2018 15:52


Originally Posted by Seagull201 (Post 10149283)
feedback....

It's dangerous to fly at night in any single engine aircraft.

Any night flying and the Night Visual Rating, should be done in a twin, with an instructor only and night circuits should be icus only.

Night flying in a single engine turbine seems to be reliable at the moment.

Everyone is aware that night circuit training at a capital city airport,, shouldn't be done in a single,
as there's too much residential area around.

Correct me if i'm wrong, the news article about the Orange accident mentioned, the aircraft veered
off the runway to the right on landing and caught fire, the training pilot pulled the instructor out of aircraft in the last
moment and saved their life.

There was talk the runway lights went out during landing but the aerodrome cameras confirmed, the
lights stayed on.

Both pilots were burnt and injured.

Hope both persons can recover and live a normal life.


Plane impacted ground just outside perimeter of airport. Understand this happened after take-off.

https://www.atsb.gov.au/publications...r/ao-2018-038/

Lets wait and see if it was engine failure or not. If it was, would a singe failure in a twin immediately after take-off (crash at perimeter) be safer than failure in a single? Especially at night? Or would the remaining engine fly you to the crash?

LeadSled 17th May 2018 16:25

Folks,
Whether you like it or not, flying a training/checking ride at night adds an extra element of risk ---- simple fact.

This is why legitimate airlines will not conduct asymmetric or a number of other exercises in non-normal configuration at night, outside a simulator.

We have on the books some very serious/fatal accidents during training at night, that probably would have been less serious/wouldn't have happened at all, in daylight --- think Metro at Tamworth, light twin at Camden, just for two.

Glib statements like "the aeroplane doesn't know it night" do no more than reveal a distinct lack of understanding of risk management --- but we know there are no shortages of smart -a ---s (alecks) in aviation.

The fact remains that having to do a biennial flight review at night, not done anywhere else I know of , and introduced by CASA without, as far as I can find, any risk analysis/justification or directed consultation, adds an additional avoidable risk factor.

Is CASA going to demand night asymmetric in a twin for a biennial review. My advice to anybody who is confronted by such a demand is to flatly refuse, it is just not worth the additional risk.

As most of you probably don't know, there are a number of CASA FOIs whom, it has been alleged,(which means I could, but I will not, give identifiable examples) will not fly a night test of any kind in a single, I wonder why that is??

Tootle pip!!

Seagull201 17th May 2018 16:26

It feels more comfortable flying a twin at night and doing night training circuits in a twin than single.

Most instructors don't want to do NVFR training in a single because they value their life.

If someone wants to fly at night in a single, they can go ahead.

Night flying is safer when flown in a twin, or flown in any turbine/jet equipment where there's two pilots up front.

In reference to the accident, i'm referring to the TV channel news i saw yesterday.

Have to wait and see what the cause was, it's not a nice sight seeing pilots hurt.


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