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Clothing.

Old 28th Aug 2020, 01:29
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
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Originally Posted by morno View Post
Why not get a flight suit? And a helmet too? Canít be too careful
I get that people think might think flight suits are pretentious or over the top for general aviation, but the company I work for has us wear flight suits and if I did any private flying I'd probably wear one too. Mostly for the convenience of not getting oil and dirt on my regular clothes and having most of what I need in my various pockets, and a scribble pad on my thigh. The fire retardant bit is just a bonus should it come to it.
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Old 28th Aug 2020, 01:45
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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I had a leather jacket made to order by a mob in Sydney some 30 years ago. I based it on one of their off the rack models and had them make some changes: I added pen pockets on the upper L sleeve, a longish skinny pocket on the right breast area for sunglasses, a square 4" pocket with clipped flap for my CR5, plus larger flapped pockets at belly level with hand warmer pockets behind. Also a couple of inside breast pockets. And a removable sheepskin collar for chilly bloody weather. Still have it today.
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Old 28th Aug 2020, 01:51
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
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Originally Posted by Fred Gassit View Post
Sounds like you haven't bought your own clothes since about 1990!
Lol, I was going to say the same thing. Other than a Good Will store, where does one get jeans for $20 ??
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Old 28th Aug 2020, 03:37
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Squawk7700 View Post
Lol, I was going to say the same thing. Other than a Good Will store, where does one get jeans for $20 ??
I bought them a while back from a 'Bravo Whisky' store that was having a sale. (They currently sell the same plain cotton T shirts for $4! Great for using as oil dipping rags after wearing..)
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Old 28th Aug 2020, 03:41
  #25 (permalink)  
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Thanks to “Subsonic”, I think I might have snagged an unlined military surplus nomex jacket without badges and suchlike. A jumper underneath if necessary and I’m good to go. Pockets for wallet, keys, phone, glasses, pens and PLB.

.....Goes over the mankini ..........
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Old 28th Aug 2020, 07:23
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Huntaway View Post
I get that people think might think flight suits are pretentious or over the top for general aviation, but the company I work for has us wear flight suits and if I did any private flying I'd probably wear one too. Mostly for the convenience of not getting oil and dirt on my regular clothes and having most of what I need in my various pockets, and a scribble pad on my thigh. The fire retardant bit is just a bonus should it come to it.
No, I didnít say General Aviation as such, I was more inferring your Sunday warriors like Sunfish. Tell me the odds of Sunfish actually being in the situation whereby heíd need such unnecessary clothing.

Flight suits when itís your job is a different kettle of fish.
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Old 28th Aug 2020, 10:16
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 1998
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As someone who's had a sh!tbox Warrior catch on fire on take-off I am very conscious about the clothing I wear when flying. No Nomex, but mainly 100% cotton including underwear.

I've also flown with people that wear bone domes in rather benign craft, I guess it's all about personal past experience, like me.
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Old 28th Aug 2020, 10:39
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by morno View Post
No, I didnít say General Aviation as such, I was more inferring your Sunday warriors like Sunfish. Tell me the odds of Sunfish actually being in the situation whereby heíd need such unnecessary clothing.
I wear an old tactical-type vest in the RV every flight, without exception. It's got a first aid kit, my PLB, small survival kit and a bunch of other goodies tucked in its' various pockets. I don't plan on ever using anything in there but if I do prang it, I might not have time to get anything else out beyond what I've got on me. Using the explanation "I fly in a plane I built in my back shed!" makes answering questions at the fuel bowser easier!
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Old 28th Aug 2020, 11:46
  #29 (permalink)  
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Morno, I second your wish that Sunday warriors were non inflammable. However this Sunday warrior has had to deal with a fire in a Cessna 172 that did about $11000 worth of damage. There is nothing quite so galvanising as smoke filling the cockpit just after takeoff. My main concern in having something fireproof, apart from saving my own skin, is to be able to continue to operate the aircraft or help others for as long as possible.

I have a healthy respect for fire gained in the CFA and if there is cheap and available fire protection then I think any pilot should consider getting some. If you have a fire and you are wearing polar fleece and synthetics, maybe synthetic runners as well, you are going to end up with extremely painful third degree burns if you survive and the hospital staff will have the delightful task of trying to separate what is left of your skin from what was molten plastic.

No synthetics except nomex, for me.

‘As for driving a car, I can always stop and get out.

I also work on Murphy’s law: if you have the safety gear, you will never need it.

Last edited by Sunfish; 28th Aug 2020 at 12:12.
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Old 29th Aug 2020, 04:37
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Sunfish, you should be able to pick up a practically unused ex-mil. nomex jacket from any number of local surplus stores for about $100.

Availability is variable.

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Old 29th Aug 2020, 04:51
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
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Sunfish:

FYI - For every flight I have ever been on (as SLF or PIC), it is a requirement for the crew to be clothed.
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Old 29th Aug 2020, 06:38
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Squawk7700 View Post
Lol, I was going to say the same thing. Other than a Good Will store, where does one get jeans for $20 ??
Not far off https://www.harrisscarfe.com.au/hs/B...Bullshead/BLSH
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Old 29th Aug 2020, 11:06
  #33 (permalink)  
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Currawong, yes. However nomex mankinis are rather hard to find.
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Old 29th Aug 2020, 12:49
  #34 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
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I have a healthy respect for fire gained in the CFA


Couple of anecdotes broadly aligned with this thread.

1. Flew with attractive young female in a Cessna 172 on her first dual cross-county flight from Essendon. She turns up wearing extremely short shorts. A bit distracting especially in such close proximity during the three sectors. On engine shutdown back at Essendon, I bit the bullet and tactfully suggested she wear clothing more suitable for future flying as an engine fire in flight could mean heat leaking through the rudder pedal area causing burns to bare limbs. Same with her sandals which showed her uncovered toes. She accepted the advice gracefully as no one had told her about this before.

2. During my time in the RAAF I was converting a senior officer to the four engined Lincoln bomber which invariably always had a slight smelt of petrol fumes in the cockpit because of the presence of fuel crossfeed cocks near the main spar. Some old aeroplanes have their own smell. For example the Dakota cockpit invariably has a whiff of hydraulic oil. The senior officer, a Wing Commander of about 40, took his place in the left seat and in the process of strapping in he suddently stopped and cautiously sniffed the air.

"Can you smell petrol" he asked me. I said it was a normal Lincoln smell.

"I don't care" said the Wingco. "We are not flying this aircraft" and with that he unstrapped and went back to his office, summoning me to follow him as he left the aircraft. In his office he told me he had flown Baltimore light bombers against the Germans during the Western Desert battles in WW2. These were flown single pilot apart from a navigator and gunner. He had watched one start its engines before takeoff. There was an explosion in the cockpit area which enveloped the pilot with fire. The pilot was unable to escape the flames. The investigation found that particular aircraft had a history of petrol fumes pervading the cockpit before start-up. On this occasion an electrical spark must have ignited the fumes.

The Wing Commander said the sight of the unfortunate pilot was forever in his mind even in peacetime and that unless one had seen what he had seen, petrol fumes didn't particularly concern some pilots.

After that episode our ground staff airmen checked the cross-feed pipes in all the squadron Lincolns and found evidence of fuel stains. The Wing Commander was right and after that maintenance was tightened up.
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Old 29th Aug 2020, 22:22
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Boiled frog syndrome, tiny whiff of fuel which gets worse extremely slowly. Everyone gradually gets used to it and accepts it as normal.

You can sometimes tell which aircraft a pilot flys by the type and location of the stains on his clothing. Westwind Pilots typically have a large carbon stain on the upper arm/shoulder area from reaching into the engines to depressurise the thrust reverser. Metroliner Pilots have lines of oil from contact with the edge of the gear doors. High wing Cessna Pilots have a gas stains from drips from the fuel drains.
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 11:54
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Great story, as always, Centaur.

Kris, B737 pilots always have a dark stain on their shoulder from ducking in and out of the wheel well, constant cuts on their hands from sharp edges in the cockpit, an indent in the top of their skull the exact size of the SERV/INT switch located on the rear overhead panel in a cockpit that anyone over 5í9 thinks they can stand up in but canít, quite, and are deaf in one or both ears due to a cockpit noise level that legally doesnít require even passive noise attenuating headsets. The last one is probably not exclusive to the B737, of course.
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 12:27
  #37 (permalink)  
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Anyone of a certain age has a dint below their right eye socket from the peep sight of an L1A1SLR.
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 13:14
  #38 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
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Originally Posted by Sunfish View Post
Anyone of a certain age has a dint below their right eye socket from the peep sight of an L1A1SLR.
At least those who managed to reach the “certain age” were obviously on the lucky end of one...
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 17:56
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Flame retardant.

Hi Vis for the ramp nazis.

Pockets

Waterproof for winter.

https://www.alibaba.com/product-deta...166276534.html
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 23:20
  #40 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
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A safety vest can always go over a coat or jacket so you still have plenty of options. Workwear shops usually have suitable clothing which complies with the relevant standards. I used to have a waterproof coat in navy blue and light green with luminous strips which was great for night freight.

I still buy from work clothing suppliers and occasionally army surplus shops, usually you’re getting a hard wearing item at a reasonable price. These shops are patronised by people who want durable clothing and aren’t interested in paying for fashion.

King Gee have a “Cool Max” fabric range which is great in tropical climates, looks smart and costs about half of what you would pay for something similar in a fancy camping shop.

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