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Plane crash at William Creek Airfield

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Plane crash at William Creek Airfield

Old 30th Jul 2019, 23:59
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Flipper

It's obviously a poor design, and prone to snapping the wheel off. The strut that's left should be aft-sprung or frangible so it bends/breaks aft and can't act as a pivot point. Better to replace an engine than flip. 5 cents worth.
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Old 31st Jul 2019, 02:16
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The technique in the video of the RV canopy is interesting but, to my mind, pointless, at least in RVs with a fore/after bar running up the centre of the windscreen. That bar and the instrument panel prevent the wielding of the tool in the way it's wielded in the video. Besides: there's no room to crawl across the top of the instrument panel and out forward.

There's only one way out: sideways.
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Old 31st Jul 2019, 05:58
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I'll just stick to the Jab.
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Old 31st Jul 2019, 15:06
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when I was a paramedic I used to carry a spring loaded centre punch in case I ever had to smash a car window. Only ever tried it on an old abandoned car but worked well on automotive glass
I wonder if it works on plexiglass, though?
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Old 31st Jul 2019, 23:42
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And in other news, an RV14A (VH-JBR) flipped on landing at an agricultural show at Speed in Victoria yesterday.




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Old 1st Aug 2019, 00:07
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Originally Posted by Desert Flower View Post
And in other news, an RV14A (VH-JBR) flipped on landing at an agricultural show at Speed in Victoria yesterday.



Canít blame the aircraft if you try to land short of the strip in the crop 😳
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 00:33
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And note that there is only one direction out: Sideways.
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 01:05
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RVs have pretty effective elevator command, and in a full flap landing, it is very easy to hold the nosewheel off the ground until a very low speed. While holding full back stick, the nosewheel sinks very slowly onto the surface. There really is no excuse for not landing an RV, ( A model), on its' mains and taxying it over any suspect surface with the nosewheel held clear: all it takes is to add a touch of power before elevator command is lost, and this holds the nosewheel clear of the surface.

Unfortunately, we are now around to a generation of RV owner/pilots who have been trained to fly the approach too fast, (might stall it!), and whack the aircraft onto the surface before it even approaches stalling, (get it on the ground and use your vg brakes!!). This theory just isn't good for safety. Whatever happened to 1.3 x Vso? With a VANS RV9A - Vso = 43 KIAS, so Vref = 56KIAS. Any competent driver should be able to manage 55-60KIAS on short final. Some of the other A models have a slightly higher Vso - more in the order of 48 KIAS. Thus, 48 x 1.3 = 63KIAS - most pilots use 65KIAS at MTOW.

It appears to me that there has been inadequate transition training happening: which really isn't compliant with the CASR 61.385 rule on general competency.

I understand that it's not just a noseleg issue with A models: there is an issue with the nosewheel locking and this creating the bending moment.

happy days,
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 02:19
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Hi Leadbaloon, thatís not right.
In the RV9a accident near Albany WA the pilot, a large guy, and his wife got out through the gap under the panel and over the roll bar, so it definitely can be done. Surprising when you see how BIG he is. He kicked the windscreen out. He says with fuel running out everywhere itís surprising how resourceful you can be. Both wings had been ripped aft when he had to land in the tops of 10 metre trees after engine failure.
It was a sliding canopy so had the forward roll bar unlike ANU.
Needed to correct you as misinformation can be dangerous, especially in cases such as this.
Cheers, RV6JOY
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 03:48
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https://m.dailymercury.com.au/news/p...-plane/435531/

Always a good idea to pack your safety hammer as Steve Maltby found out.

​​​​​​​
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 03:59
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Originally Posted by Desert Flower View Post
And in other news, an RV14A (VH-JBR) flipped on landing at an agricultural show at Speed in Victoria yesterday.
Hopefully those on board are okay? Only news is the Weekly Times, and its behind a paywall.
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 04:56
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Originally Posted by Egipps View Post
Hopefully those on board are okay? Only news is the Weekly Times, and its behind a paywall.
A man in his 70's from Mildura suffered minor injuries & was taken to hospital.

DF.

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Old 1st Aug 2019, 05:13
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I am not sure that the test of the plexicglass on a canopy not rigidly mounted against the cockpit and just held in the air by people is valid. The loose cockpit can flex on being hit making any cracking extend while the in place cockpit would not be prone to flex the same. My guess is that a safety ax as in larger aircraft is the minimum I would rely on.
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 05:30
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Originally Posted by RV6JOY View Post
Hi Leadbaloon, thatís not right.
In the RV9a accident near Albany WA the pilot, a large guy, and his wife got out through the gap under the panel and over the roll bar, so it definitely can be done. Surprising when you see how BIG he is. He kicked the windscreen out. He says with fuel running out everywhere itís surprising how resourceful you can be. Both wings had been ripped aft when he had to land in the tops of 10 metre trees after engine failure.
It was a sliding canopy so had the forward roll bar unlike ANU.
Needed to correct you as misinformation can be dangerous, especially in cases such as this.
Cheers, RV6JOY
So the aircraft to which you refer was flat on its back with the engine cowl in the dirt? I very much doubt it. But I could be wrong.
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 08:10
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Originally Posted by Lead Balloon View Post

So the aircraft to which you refer was flat on its back with the engine cowl in the dirt? I very much doubt it. But I could be wrong.
Yep flat on it back. Fell vertically nose down out of the tree onto the ground and fell on its back from there. Kicked the windscreen out and wriggled through. I guess you could kick the panel shade cover down easily to give yourself more room. He azures me it was not that hard and as I said he is a big guy, Iíd say 115 kilos easy.
Important that people know that so they try it if trapped. He is a lawyer and has no reason to bullshit about it. They were very lucky.
As I said it has the front roll bar, same as mine.
Cheers

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Old 1st Aug 2019, 08:20
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Unfortunately, we are now around to a generation of RV owner/pilots who have been trained to fly the approach too fast, (might stall it!), and whack the aircraft onto the surface before it even approaches stalling, (get it on the ground and use your vg brakes!!). This theory just isn't good for safety. Whatever happened to 1.3 x Vso? With a VANS RV9A - Vso = 43 KIAS, so Vref = 56KIAS. Any competent driver should be able to manage 55-60KIAS on short final. Some of the other A models have a slightly higher Vso - more in the order of 48 KIAS. Thus, 48 x 1.3 = 63KIAS - most pilots use 65KIAS at MTOW.
I will be even more blunt and say that those that get the "A: model are either too lazy to get the training or lack the skills to master a tailwheel aircraft. Sadly if this is indeed the case then in all likelihood they also lack the skills to fly the nose dragger properly. Having flown both, the taildragger is, in my opinion, superior and also a tad faster.

Just saying .....
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 08:40
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Originally Posted by Aussie Bob View Post
I will be even more blunt and say that those that get the "A: model are either too lazy to get the training or lack the skills to master a tailwheel aircraft. Sadly if this is indeed the case then in all likelihood they also lack the skills to fly the nose dragger properly. Having flown both, the taildragger is, in my opinion, superior and also a tad faster.

Just saying .....
Superior in what way ?
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 09:30
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Perhaps Aussie Bob those who opt for the A models actually prefer an aircraft with a much higher and safer crosswind performance?
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 09:32
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Originally Posted by On eyre View Post


Superior in what way ?
They look better!
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 09:33
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RV14/14A undercarriage testing.
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