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Cirrus night flying accident report just published

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Cirrus night flying accident report just published

Old 6th Jun 2019, 04:45
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Cirrus night flying accident report just published

Investigation: AO-2018-038 - Loss of control and collision with terrain involving Cirrus SR22, VH-PDC, Orange Airport, NSW, on 15 May 2018

When conducting night flying for the first time, especially at an aerodrome that is devoid of external lights, it would be wise to first ensure the student is proficient at go-around on instruments at point of flare. That includes the initial takeoff climb out which may be fully on instruments if dark night conditions exist.
For flight safety reasons, go-arounds from the flare on instruments are best practiced initially at a safe altitude and in daylight. . This should be part of normal instrument flying training . For example by using an assumed ground level of 1000 feet agl, have the student under the hood so that the go-around at the flare gives no chance of cheating by glancing for a quick look outside. The exercise is complete after the flaps have been retracted and en-route climb speed attained. Even a Cessna 152 will yaw left quite strongly if full power is applied while full flaps are down and airspeed is low as in the flare and hold-off.

Make no mistake about it, a go-around on instruments at night close to the ground requires good instrument flying skills and in particular coping with pitch attitude changes with flap retraction. Which is the reason why with student pilots the exercise is best conducted initially in daylight under the hood before night flying training takes place.
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Old 6th Jun 2019, 08:36
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Originally Posted by Centaurus View Post
Investigation: AO-2018-038 - Loss of control and collision with terrain involving Cirrus SR22, VH-PDC, Orange Airport, NSW, on 15 May 2018

When conducting night flying for the first time, especially at an aerodrome that is devoid of external lights, it would be wise to first ensure the student is proficient at go-around on instruments at point of flare. That includes the initial takeoff climb out which may be fully on instruments if dark night conditions exist.
For flight safety reasons, go-arounds from the flare on instruments are best practiced initially at a safe altitude and in daylight. . This should be part of normal instrument flying training . For example by using an assumed ground level of 1000 feet agl, have the student under the hood so that the go-around at the flare gives no chance of cheating by glancing for a quick look outside. The exercise is complete after the flaps have been retracted and en-route climb speed attained. Even a Cessna 152 will yaw left quite strongly if full power is applied while full flaps are down and airspeed is low as in the flare and hold-off.

Make no mistake about it, a go-around on instruments at night close to the ground requires good instrument flying skills and in particular coping with pitch attitude changes with flap retraction. Which is the reason why with student pilots the exercise is best conducted initially in daylight under the hood before night flying training takes place.

very true there Centy. Few would experience this critical stage of flight, I have a few times from light twins to high perf jets, makes you sit bolt upright! I've always said it's too easy to get a pilots ticket inc instructors!
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Old 6th Jun 2019, 11:56
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​​​​​a go-around on instruments at night close to the ground requires good instrument flying skills and in particular coping with pitch attitude changes with flap retraction.​​
Why is that different to a normal take-off at night? Because it is unexpected? Both pilots were Instrument Rated.
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Old 6th Jun 2019, 13:42
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Centaurus, your thread-starts are always thought-provoking and enjoyable to read, keep them coming.
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Old 13th Jun 2019, 09:18
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Originally Posted by cooperplace View Post
Centaurus, your thread-starts are always thought-provoking and enjoyable to read, keep them coming.
Very true. Centaurus: Spoken like a bloke thatís been there and done it 👍
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Old 13th Jun 2019, 12:35
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Originally Posted by Centaurus View Post
Investigation: AO-2018-038 - Loss of control and collision with terrain involving Cirrus SR22, VH-PDC, Orange Airport, NSW, on 15 May 2018
Make no mistake about it, a go-around on instruments at night close to the ground requires good instrument flying skills and in particular coping with pitch attitude changes with flap retraction. Which is the reason why with student pilots the exercise is best conducted initially in daylight under the hood before night flying training takes place.
My first experience of night flying was during night VFR training at an airport that had a particularly crappy PAL system that couldn't be reset. Moonless night. Hill obscured the town lights. Once the lights were in imminent shutdown phase (rotating beacon on the windsock etc.) you had to orbit until they turned off and you could reactivate them.

I got one circuit (with low level go-around) and then on the second circuit at about 60 foot EVERYTHING went black.

Brilliant learning experience.

My night rating instructors insisted on multiple go-around scenarios with eyes down and straight onto instrument scans.

As a previous computer gamer, this seemed simple and logical to me.
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