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C210 "RATING" Referred to by overseas employers

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C210 "RATING" Referred to by overseas employers

Old 11th Apr 2019, 04:20
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C210 "RATING" Referred to by overseas employers

If anyone can shed some light:

I'm very aware you can't get a "rating" (to use operators' word) in Australia on a C210 as it is covered under the SEA provision. Design feature wise, if a candidate already has MPPC and RU endorsed on the CPL via Multi Engine Class Rating, then what exactly is considered a "C210 type rating"? Is this simply just time on type?

Just looking at general requirements with overseas charter operators and would like some comments on people with CASA licenes who've had to prove that they're "rated".
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Old 11th Apr 2019, 09:04
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Flown one solo? - you’re “rated”.
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Old 11th Apr 2019, 10:59
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That easy? I look into hiring then
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Old 11th Apr 2019, 11:09
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Come on jjhews, it’s not that hard!
You have a logbook with C210 time logged! That’s what you put in your job application.
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Old 11th Apr 2019, 20:50
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Fair enough question if you haven't had to deal with it before. The issue for the employer may be that their national regulator still lists type ratings for smaller aircraft, and you will need to convince them of suitable qualifications and/or experience. Pilots coming to Australia had the reverse problem with light multi-engine type endorsements until Part 61 came in.

Generally if you can provide logbook evidence that you have command time on the type, or a statement of some sort from a training organisation that you have completed training and demonstrated competency etc. etc. most regulators will be satisfied.
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Old 11th Apr 2019, 22:04
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Originally Posted by Look Mum - no hands View Post
Generally if you can provide logbook evidence that you have command time on the type, or a statement of some sort from a training organisation that you have completed training and demonstrated competency etc. etc. most regulators will be satisfied.

Great, thanks a lot for your response.
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Old 12th Apr 2019, 12:04
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CASA have effectively created “type ratings” for every type and for the same type depending on the equipment fitted.
Sure, you can go and jump into something you’ve not flown before with the appropriate class and design feature qual’s. If you bend it, you’d be likely deemed not competent and subject to CASA action.

General Competency Rule (61.385)
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Old 13th Apr 2019, 08:14
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Originally Posted by roundsounds View Post
CASA have effectively created “type ratings” for every type and for the same type depending on the equipment fitted.
Sure, you can go and jump into something you’ve not flown before with the appropriate class and design feature qual’s. If you bend it, you’d be likely deemed not competent and subject to CASA action.

General Competency Rule (61.385)
The general competency rule (61.385) is really just common sense. CASA’s administration of it probably won’t be. As a previous poster said, have some sort of paper trail. Getting checked out to hire and fly the aircraft should cover it.
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Old 14th Apr 2019, 01:47
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Originally Posted by Cloudee View Post

The general competency rule (61.385) is really just common sense. CASA’s administration of it probably won’t be. As a previous poster said, have some sort of paper trail. Getting checked out to hire and fly the aircraft should cover it.
Agree. Ask for your logbook to be endorsed with a statement to effect that ' found competent to fly this aircraft under 61.385'
happy days,
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Old 14th Apr 2019, 12:41
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Originally Posted by poteroo View Post
Agree. Ask for your logbook to be endorsed with a statement to effect that ' found competent to fly this aircraft under 61.385'
happy days,
hahahahahaha........
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Old 14th Apr 2019, 12:44
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Originally Posted by poteroo View Post
Agree. Ask for your logbook to be endorsed with a statement to effect that ' found competent to fly this aircraft under 61.385'
happy days,
FWIW, I was let loose on a 210 without anyone onboard. Had a CPL and 200 hours and no ******* idea. I still remember thinking to myself after takeoff, what the **** do I do. A few hours later im fairly close to realising I still don’t know **** all.
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Old 15th Apr 2019, 12:12
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Originally Posted by jjhews View Post
If anyone can shed some light:

I'm very aware you can't get a "rating" (to use operators' word) in Australia on a C210 as it is covered under the SEA provision. Design feature wise, if a candidate already has MPPC and RU endorsed on the CPL via Multi Engine Class Rating, then what exactly is considered a "C210 type rating"? Is this simply just time on type?

Just looking at general requirements with overseas charter operators and would like some comments on people with CASA licenes who've had to prove that they're "rated".
Depends on what country you are going to and their regulations. Some will accept time on type some won't and you will have to sit a ground exam and maybe a flight test on aircraft. Really it all depends on the country. Africa generally will want you to do a type rating but they will accept some certification if you can get it of your Training
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Old 16th Apr 2019, 02:07
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Thank you all for your replies!
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Old 16th Apr 2019, 02:53
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If you’re in the US get your training provider to print a snazzy certificate stating you’ve received x.x hrs of ground instruction and x.x hrs of flight instruction and you’re proficient in the operation of airplane X.
We used to do this frequently for foreign students.
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Old 16th Apr 2019, 08:50
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The instructor who helped me transition onto a complex aircraft told me that CASA's aeroplane questionnaire is used by some operators as evidence that a pilot is proficient on type. It probably won't hurt to just fill one out for the C210 and have it checked and signed by a school.
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