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CASA Exams Tagging Rules Changed

Old 20th Apr 2010, 01:41
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CASA Exams Tagging Rules Changed

Hi folks,

Just got an email from CASA with revised tagging rules.

From 3rd May 2010

CAR CASR NO TAGS PERMITTED.

CAO NO TAGS PERMITTED

AIP MAX 10 TAGS

ERSA MAX 5 TAGS

DAPS NO TAGS PERMITTED

CAAP NO TAGS PERMITTED

HANDBOOK AND OPS MANUAL of EXAM AIRCRAFT MODEL NO TAGS PERMITTED

ALL CHARTS NO TAGS PERMITTED

ANYTHING ELSE NOT LISTED NO TASGS PERMITTED


Mods, could we sticky this for a little while.
Ozgrade3 is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 01:47
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This is a wise decision.

How early are you going to have to get to exams now when they not only have to check every single page of your documents but also count all the bloody tags! Congratulations CASA on another job well done!

And does that mean you're at a further disadvantage if you use the Jeppesen Manuals?
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 02:00
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CASA Exam Policy Tags, Highlighting & Underlining in Exam-Permitted Publications Effective 3 May 2010

Background


In earlier years CAA/CASA did not permit underlining, highlighting and tagging of reference documents allowed in exams for the reason that reference publications such as the Civil Aviation Regulations (CAR) (1988), Civil Aviation Orders (CAO) and the Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP) (the book itself) have excellent coverage of the sections and procedures in both the Contents and Index pages.
However, recognizing the usefulness of ‘selective’ underlining, highlighting and tagging of some of the more-frequently used or important sections in these publications, CASA decided a few years ago to allow these practices, with conditions that there shall be no training/explanatory notes, study aide-memoires, formulae, or cross-referencing between pages of a document or across to other documents, either in the documents or on the tags.
Problems

Not understanding purpose of tags


Unfortunately some exam candidates might not have realized the existence and usefulness of the Contents and Index pages, or have abandoned or ignored their use. They seemed to depend solely on tags, a practice acknowledged by a few schools teaching these candidates.
It would appear that these candidates have virtually replaced the functions of the Content and Index pages with a staggering multitude of tags. Such an approach is actually counter-productive to the aim and value of tagging. As the purpose of tags is to swiftly and precisely locate a selected number of the more-frequently referenced sections in publications, these candidates have, through the over abundance of tags per publication, unwittingly neutralised any benefits they may derive from them.
The same observation applies to the practice of highlighting and underlining of texts in permitted publications. Some candidates have highlighted or underlined entire pages. What then would be the benefit in such indiscriminate actions other than for the candidates to view coloured and completely underlined pages during exams?
Security issue


When a candidate brings into an exam session several reference publications, as would be the case in air law or IREX exams, with each book having as many as 30 tags or more, and the session comprises 12 to 15 candidates, the supervisor is confronted with a security situation which may adversely affect his/her primary supervisory role. CASA cannot accept any situation which impacts adversely on the integrity of CASA exam sittings.
Updated Policy w.e.f 03 May 2010


Given the current unsatisfactory situation, CASA has updated its policy on the use of tags, to be made effective on Monday 03 May 2010.

The new policy will specify which exam-permitted documents may have tags and their respective maximum number. This will actually make the role of tags more effective and thus benefit exam candidates. The policy on underlining and highlighting of text in exam-permitted documents remain unchanged.
Role of schools & instructors


Schools and instructors are also encouraged to guide their students back to more effective use of the Contents & Index pages of the exam-permitted documents when the students need to refer to specific air laws and flight procedures to answer exam questions.

Instructors should also advise their students on the correct way to highlight and underline texts in the exam-permitted publications. The aim is to bring out for their immediate attention, during a very involved exam session, useful keywords or phrases, therefore the operative word in highlighting and underlining should be judicious selections of the text.
‘Contents’ and 'Index' pages


CASA updated policy has taken into consideration the respective publication’s layout, availability of official printed section dividers, and the quality of the 'Contents’ and 'Index' pages.
Tags permitted or not permitted

The following lists the maximum number of tags per respective publication where such publications are permitted in exam session:
  1. (i) CAR (1988), (ii) CASR (1998) [used in only Balloon exam], and (iii) Part 137 [used in aeroplane agricultural rating exam] – no tag permitted
  2. CAO – no tag permitted
  3. AIP Book (or its Jeppesen equivalent) – maximum 10 (ten) tags
  4. ERSA – maximum 5 (five) tags
  5. Day VFR Guide (note: this publication has been temporarily withdrawn) – no tag permitted
  6. DAP East & West – no tag permitted
  7. CAAP – no tag permitted
  8. Handbook and Operations Manual of exam aircraft model – no tag permitted
  9. All charts – no tag permitted
  10. Any exam-permitted publication not listed here – no tag permitted
Condition for sitting exam

Candidates who tag their exam-permitted publications in excess of the above limits will not be allowed to undertake the exam until they remove the extra tags.
"the supervisor is confronted with a security situation"
Damn terrorist explosive tags!
So does this mean that you'll be given an extra 15 minutes in Flight Planning to keep referring to the contents page? I think not. I realised the usefulness of the contents and index pages years ago...and decided that tags were far less ambiguous.
Led Zep is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 02:27
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You beat me to it Led Zep, the contents and Indexes would nbe more bebficial if used as toilet paper.
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 02:46
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Oh where do I begin...

1. (i) CAR (1988) ... – no tag permitted
2. CAO – no tag permitted
Because the CAO and CAR has such a fantastic contents and index pages already doesn't it. Oh wait, it doesn't. It takes me long enough to look up things in them with my dozen tags already there.

The new policy will specify which exam-permitted documents may have tags and their respective maximum number. This will actually make the role of tags more effective and thus benefit exam candidates.
My AIP currently has 28 tags ranging from VMC criteria to IFR take off minima. I can turn to any of the major topics that are in the AIP for the CPL and CIR syllabus in roughly 5 seconds. Going through the index, trying to find the right place would take considerably longer. Especially since a lot of the smaller references arn't in the index, or are part of a larger section.

the supervisor is confronted with a security situation which may adversely affect his/her primary supervisory role
What? Are they going to ban small plastic sticking tags going through airport security next?

As the purpose of tags is to swiftly and precisely locate a selected number of the more-frequently referenced sections in publications
Which is precisely what I've done with my dozen tags in the CAO and over two dozen tags in AIP. Where did I find this information in the first place? The index. All I'm doing is cutting out the searching time by doing it before hand and not in time critical and stressful exams.
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 03:43
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When I did ATPL airlaw I finished the exam with only minutes to spare and used the tagging system that was provided by AFT that is CASA approved.

I wonder what will happen to such systems?

I would imagine now the exam will now become very time critical.

Glad I don't have to hand the buggers anymore money ever again
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 04:43
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Guess it would be best to remove the tags from my FCOM, would hate to be accused of cheating come check time.
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 07:30
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Holy Sh*t, I had more tags than pages and still had 'time' issues when doing both exams. It would be acceptable if the docs had a decent index. What a stupid change
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 08:05
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had me a look on the casa website and the ASL site. no mention on the homepages of either about this major change. had to do a specific search on casa to find it.

When was the regulator going to notify the flying public of this change?

I feel sorry for those who don't know, who show up for an exam after the 3rd only to be told to remove their tabs
AussieNick is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 08:20
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If your on CASA's mailing list it was sent out today.
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 10:03
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WWWW

Mate, that post was hilarious!

Let us know how it goes doing your ATPL Law without tags.

Do you want to be a professional pilot? Well, professionals know their sh1t.
Yes, we know the stuff that we use every day.

The ATPL law (and probably CPL law) exams want you to know some pretty obscure stuff. Let me know how often you can remember the flight & duty time limitations for 3 crew, or rules for inbound international flights.

DIVOSH!

Last edited by Di_Vosh; 20th Apr 2010 at 10:08. Reason: Clarity
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 10:03
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Being the devils advocate to your devils advocate, if Professional Pilots know their stuff, here's a challenge for you. Go back to the top, remove all but the allowed tags from your documents and re-sit a cyber exam and tell us how you do, you 'Professional Pirate' you...

j3
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 11:42
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Do you want to be a professional pilot? Well, professionals know their sh1t.
That's exactly why I never use a checklist when I fly. Rulebooks and references are for unprofessional slobs.

I just want to know how much easier we have to make these tests what with Bob Taits books and Cyber Exams
That's right, real pilots were born knowing this stuff. Pffft, Bob Tait books indeed; I've got the God-given [Air] Law written on my heart (G. Secombe students would get that one).

Probably two of the dumbest statements I've come across on PPRuNe (and there have been some pearlers).

FRQ CB
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 11:45
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excerpt from letter sent to CASA.

Dear Sir,

Thankyou for taking my telephone call today. I would appreciate the opportunity to provide what is meant to be constructive criticism.

Firstly, can I suggest that CASA provide industry with the opportunity to be involved on an exam panel. You could perhaps invite a small number of CFIs or ground instructors to participate from each state and provide industry feedback on the strengths and weaknesses of each of the exams. I feel this is an area that you would have a large interest from industry. The extra resources made available would allow the exams to be changed and updated on a more regular basis than is presently available to you. You would also be able to incorporate relevant subjects incorporated into exams. For example Class D questions should maybe be increased in light of upcoming changes at GAAPs.

I believe that the general consensus within the industry is that the current indexes are inadequate and could do with some industry consultation to promptly update them. This could be achieved in one meeting I believe.

The short notice for the changes has caused some difficulty. We taught an Air Law class last week. The students are well prepared, but do have tagged documents. With the sometimes long lead times between completing a course and being able to book an exam with ASL I have a number of students who will now need to prepare for the new requirements.

Perhaps consideration should be given to an extension of the time permitted for the exam.

My personal opinion is that reasonable tagging enhances flight safety as if the documents are less formidable and easier to use then students are more likely to refer to them, rather than acting on their beliefs of the correct interpretation.

I have been flying for over 25 years and my job requires me to regularly refer back to documents. In order to promptly but accurately provide answers I feel that reasonable tagging is an asset.

Perhaps CASA could consider an approved set of tags designed with industry consultation that could be made available to students.

We need to bear in mind that we are dealing with relatively inexperienced pilots with usually less than 100 hours experience trying to wade through a mass of documents.

As the documents are available on line, perhaps students could prepare their own documents. For example a PPL candidate needs access to only a small part of the CAOs and CARs. If they could print only the relevant pages from the website and take those into the exam that would probably negate the need for any tagging at all.

Thanks for your consideration, Cheers
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 12:06
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I just booked for Air Law on 24/4/10, the last pre 3/5/10 sitting at YPPF. I reckon I'll put tags in my charts just because I can. No legitimate reason really. Maybe I'll tag ERC1 with and ERC1 tag etc.

I cannot imagine sitting Flight Planning without my tags. The index is shocking, the text is of questionable legibility, most of the pages looks so damn similar to about 30 others (cruise scheds) and there's very little logic in the way it is laid out. If it was a cockpit it would be banned by and self-respecting Authority for such woeful ergonomics, prone to human error.

Here's an idea, if you chop off the top cm of the book carefully leaving little chads (thank you US election of 2000 for my knowledge of that word) where the tags were would you be in contravention of the "Updated Policy"? What if you get a drill and carefully make those little indentations as seen in fancy dictionaries and encyclopedia?

What a ridiculous rule. God help you who sit Flight Planning post 3-may-2010.

FRQ CB

I shall dub the first method above (cutting most of the top cm off) the FRQ CB Stone Carving method based on my HS art teached who said that sculpting a human head was easy, you just chisel off everything that doesn't look like a human head. Just cut off every bit of paper that doesn't look like a tag.

Last edited by FRQ Charlie Bravo; 20th Apr 2010 at 12:12. Reason: To assert the naming rights to my idea
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 13:42
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What a complete and utterly pointless policy from CASA.
It would appear that these candidates have virtually replaced the functions of the Content and Index pages with a staggering multitude of tags. Such an approach is actually counter-productive to the aim and value of tagging. As the purpose of tags is to swiftly and precisely locate a selected number of the more-frequently referenced sections in publications, these candidates have, through the over abundance of tags per publication, unwittingly neutralised any benefits they may derive from them.
So, if candidates are putting all these tags on the books themselves, which supposedly all have Contents and Index pages, and are disadvantaging themselves by doing so - so what?
The same observation applies to the practice of highlighting and underlining of texts in permitted publications. Some candidates have highlighted or underlined entire pages. What then would be the benefit in such indiscriminate actions other than for the candidates to view coloured and completely underlined pages during exams?
Well, my dear CASA, this is a perfect example of the logical fallacy of hasty generalisation- and proves nothing. The fact that whoever wrote that paragraph does not see any benefit to large amounts of highlighting does not mean there is no benefit.




If I may be so bold, I suspect that the real reason for all of this, alluded to in the "security issue", is that many airline cadets are writing large amounts of information on tags in languages that are not English, and therefore the exam supervisor has no way of knowing whether or not the student is cheating.
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 22:37
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I suspect that the real reason for all of this, alluded to in the "security issue", is that many airline cadets are writing large amounts of information on tags in languages that are not English
Now we are getting nearer the truth. A decent user oriented index and tagging would not be necessary.
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 23:39
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What about bringing the VFG into the PPL exam, can you still do that but not write on the tags?
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 01:18
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Grrr

Tags weren't invented when I did Air Legislation... as it was called then.

And half the SCPL Air Leg Exam was closed book! Tag That!
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 05:29
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How about a better solution, CASA?

Youve already directed that tags are not to contain formulas and notes - How about a statement that tags must be in English? That way the supervisor can tell whether or not it's a normal tag, or one containing notes.
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