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What makes a good charter pilot?

Old 30th Apr 2009, 02:37
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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The ability to cope with being continuously shafted by the operator's you work for
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 03:28
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The ability to survive on 2 min noodles and lose all sence of smell. Not to mention the ability to not dry retch when moping up spew
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 06:39
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Knowing the accurate fuel capacity of the aircraft, even though they have been flying it for 1 year. Believe me some don't.
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 07:31
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What makes a good charter pilot

Socks and Thongs:
Ando1Bar:

A most important point to mention, is that of your own standard.

I flew VIP's for many years. My standard of operation was that if I had a good safe pleasant flight, then everbody behind me had the same flight. There should be no different standard, if you have passengers or not.

Do not tell untruths and gain and maintain the trust of the Clients

Tmb
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 09:44
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A good chief pilot.
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 11:46
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Know your machine, a good knowledge of the systems, fuel capacity and endurance. Be able to work out accurate payloads / endurance at different fuel loads off the top of your head.

Know the rules and operator SOP's well, You cant always pull out the books.

Listen to all the advice you can get, then decide whether you think its crap or not.

Probably the most dangerous phrase in G.A "she'll be right". she aint always right, often shes not even close.
My other favourite one is 'the last guy did it ok." (There is a joke in NZ that sums this one up quite well)

Expect to be put on the spot. Whether it be taking extra weight from a short strip or pushing into bad weather. Set your limits early and dont push beyond them. the pax may kick up a stink but safety has to be the over-riding factor at all times, its for their benefit too. if your getting worried then usually your pax started to worry 10 minutes ago.

Other than that I would suggest getting a taste for canned food and always carry a good book with you. At the end of the day GA is a fun sector of aviation, try and enjoy it.
Its only as dangerous as you choose to make it.
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 12:01
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Other than that I would suggest getting a taste for canned food
Heeey Bro, wanna chup???
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 12:23
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Are your students working with a flight and duty programe while training?
They never seem to know much when they start out with a fresh CPL.

As Mr Hat states " know when to turn back "
Know what the M/R should be used for
Know how an MEL works
Understand weight and balance
Keep the a/c clean, wipe oil off cowls, u/c doors ect
Wear an ironed shirt!!!
Not so popular with the boss / clients - tats, personal metal fittings ect
Log I/F correctly
Ride your motor bike sedately around the office area

ect ect ect
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 12:54
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Play Flight SIM until you have 10,000 hours on type.........
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 13:13
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Ciscodiscocisco you where the best charter pilot that I ever met even thou you werent one and lied to some clients who later requested you .

For my two cents a pilot with a a good rapport with the clients and keeps a clean aircraft will go a long way. Remember there chartering the plane for a reason, not to build your hours.
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 13:27
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know how to fly overweight if required. know how to get back with a system unserviceablity when others might not. know how to 'get in' when others cant.

can see certain types cringing at just the few points mentioned. funny thing is these qualities/skills go all the way to airline flying and arguably into space flight.

Last edited by hoss; 1st May 2009 at 08:24.
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Old 30th Apr 2009, 14:24
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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To expand on Rudder's comment:
A good CP; a good instructor; a good aircraft; a good company; good pilots to work with; a good engineer; good ATC; good weather forecasting; good surveillance; good passengers; etc. It's a team thing.
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Old 1st May 2009, 07:46
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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thanks cessna i think we flew a couple of times together i think i was sitting in the back seat while you were taking the controls...... and thats how you got the nick of cessnamastarbatter cause thats what you were doing in one fine cessna.....

Well anyways i got my endorsement in the 787 and still remm the days at work.

Take care buddy
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Old 1st May 2009, 12:14
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Know how to spell
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Old 1st May 2009, 12:56
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of couurse i do im a pilot i know it all.....isnt that rtrue cessna??
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Old 1st May 2009, 15:03
  #36 (permalink)  
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Know how to spell
Take it easy on Ciscodisco, english is his second language, a very distant second.`

For my two cents a pilot with a a good rapport with the clients and keeps a clean aircraft will go a long way. Remember there chartering the plane for a reason, not to build your hours.
Good comment Cessna MB, you sure you're not thinking of running a charter outfit?

One trait I would like to add...don't go weak at the knees just because the TAF has a Prob30 for thunderys.
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Old 1st May 2009, 21:54
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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....a good pay packet
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Old 1st May 2009, 23:45
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Something simple. Develop a technique for hot and cold starts for your engine that works with minimal engine cranking/backfires/engine that runs then stops due vapour lock/ puffs of black smoke/ revs the sh*t out of the motor. Passengers do not like the above mentioned. They just dont understand the concept of a vapour locked engine.
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Old 2nd May 2009, 03:01
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Clear eyes(the eye drops, I mean), tic tak's and no-doz.
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Old 2nd May 2009, 05:38
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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know how to fly overweight if required. know how to get back with a system unserviceablity when others might not. know how to 'get in' when others cant.
I disagree entirely with the above. My advice would be, be prepared to say NO politely but firmly, to any employers, clients or engineers asking you to operate illegally. It will happen, so be ready to stand your ground.

Nobody ever expects a flight to end in an accident. But every time you fly, consider that your preparation will become subject to rigorous examination if someone gets hurt.

Your professionalism and discipline alone will determine what is said about you following an accident investigation. Decide in advance that should someone get hurt today, it may be fate, or it may be circumstance beyond my control - but MY actions will not be found contributing.

There are simply no excuses for operating overweight that will withstand public scrutiny following an accident. Don't be drawn on discussions about technicalities - performance has nothing to do with it. All that matters is that you come up the kok if the flight doesn't go your way.

Consider how such factors would be considered by a court and/or the media if someone gets hurt while you're PIC. Consider how such findings would be viewed by your peers and prospective employers. You will encounter (and rightly so) some very rigid views on this topic should you aspire to flying larger aircraft later in your career.

It's YOUR license, it's YOU who is responsible.

If fate deals you a raw hand, try your best to make sure it wasn't you who poked the first hole in the cheese
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