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-   -   PPL and time building in the US - which school? (https://www.pprune.org/north-america/601611-ppl-time-building-us-school.html)

jaco0112 7th Nov 2017 21:26

PPL and time building in the US - which school?
 
Hello everyone I'll be short and concise. I am Italian and I intend to get a PPL in the States (East Coast possibily) and then staying there further to accumulate flying hours. Afterwards I'll start studying for a theoretical ATPL (perhaps in distance learning), most likely in Europe.

I basically need a good advice on good flying schools in the United States specially in the East Coast, but other locations will also be taken into consideration.

I'm not interested in going for the cheapest one but rather for those with the best quality/price where I would be able to gain flying experience in the best possible conditions (time, weather, good instructors, good airplanes). I am aware the perfect flying school doesn't exist but any suggestion (perhaps after personal experience) will be more than welcome.
Thanks a lot for your cooperation and I apologize in advance if the topic has already been already discussed in other sections. In that case I would ask you to redirect me to the appropriate section perhaps by putting the link please ;)

Transsonic2000 12th Nov 2017 13:27

Hi,

and welcome to the forum! At this time of the year (fall/winter) the Southern States like Florida is a good choice if you want to progress through your PPL training without any major delays, but States like California, Arizona and/or Texas also offer very good stable weather conditions during this time. You might also want to consider a school which offers an EASA syllabus as well since you mentioned that you intend to start with the EASA ATP studies afterwards. Here a few schools.


https://www.flightschoolusa.com/ (also offers EASA training, lots of European students)

https://www.flightsafetyacademy.com/ (one of the top US flight schools)

https://www.flyeft.com/

JAA/EASA Airline Pilot Course | Skymates, Inc. (offer EASA training as well)

CAE Oxford Aviation Academy Phoenix (EASA training)

https://www.saaintl.com/

Aeroguard | Elite Flight Training (big international flight school, I believe no EASA training offered)

Home - Falcon Aviation Academy (school located in Georgia)

Hope I could help and good luck :ok:

turbopropulsion 29th Nov 2017 13:47


Originally Posted by jaco0112 (Post 9949897)
Hello everyone I'll be short and concise. I am Italian and I intend to get a PPL in the States (East Coast possibily) and then staying there further to accumulate flying hours. Afterwards I'll start studying for a theoretical ATPL (perhaps in distance learning), most likely in Europe.

I basically need a good advice on good flying schools in the United States specially in the East Coast, but other locations will also be taken into consideration.

I'm not interested in going for the cheapest one but rather for those with the best quality/price where I would be able to gain flying experience in the best possible conditions (time, weather, good instructors, good airplanes). I am aware the perfect flying school doesn't exist but any suggestion (perhaps after personal experience) will be more than welcome.
Thanks a lot for your cooperation and I apologize in advance if the topic has already been already discussed in other sections. In that case I would ask you to redirect me to the appropriate section perhaps by putting the link please ;)

Translate :

Hello, I have done absolutely no research in my next life chapter but feel I can make a 'difference' in Aviation. Please send me links

rudestuff 29th Nov 2017 22:15

Don't bother with an EASA PPL. You will have to wait to get the licence issued. Get an FAA PPL and hour build on that, the day you pass your test you get the licence and can carry passengers. You should also add an FAA IR during hour building. It'll reduce your EASA IR costs massively.

HEMS driver 29th Nov 2017 23:39

Here are a couple of good schools in St. Augustine, Florida.

Florida Aviation Career Training, Inc.

https://www.flightschoolusa.com/

Buona fortuna.

B2N2 30th Nov 2017 16:33

Here’s my bit;
I agree with all of the above except picking a random school or shade tree Instructor.
Cheap does not equal good in aviation.
Find a school experienced with European students and especially differences in logging between the USA and EASA.
For example under FAA you can log your Intrument Training as PIC since you are rated in the airplane.
Last think you want is going back to EASA land and being told your hours are logged incorrectly and you need to redo part of it.
So use either two separate logbooks or one where you log the differences.
As FAA PIC ( can be with Instructor ) and EASA PIC ( can not be with Instructor).
Also look into the cross country requirements for the EASA CPL.
When you’re smart about it you can easily fly all the requirements during your time building.

TWApilot 27th Dec 2017 19:31

I did most of my flight instruction at Prairie Air Service in Benton, Kansas. The instructor, Herb Pello is outstanding. You stay in guest rooms at his home located on the airport, flying twice a day. All multi-engine instruction is done in his Piper Apache which he's owned for decades. As a result, his costs are low and he hasn't really raised prices much since I received my training there in the early 1990s. The prices for various packages are shown on his website. I received my instrument rating in the multi-engine Apache in about two weeks. I returned for my multi-engine Commercial and again for my multi-engine Instructor license. He is geared for knocking out your training in minimal time, but instruction is very thorough and the best I've ever had. I cannot recommend him highly enough. I would never have succeeded as an airline pilot without the training I received from Herb. And the price cannot be beat anywhere.

Also, Herb is originally from Austria and has extensive experience training European students.

Their website is: www.prairieairservice.com
The phone number is (316) 778-1712

jaco0112 23rd Jan 2018 10:50


Originally Posted by rudestuff (Post 9973647)
Don't bother with an EASA PPL. You will have to wait to get the licence issued. Get an FAA PPL and hour build on that, the day you pass your test you get the licence and can carry passengers. You should also add an FAA IR during hour building. It'll reduce your EASA IR costs massively.

Hi rudestuff, I completely agree on getting a FAA PPL and hour build on that but concerning to the FAA IR (SE), is it really convenient to do it in US and convert it in EU afterwards? I discussed with a young pilot couple of days ago and he told me not to do it. Could you comment a bit on that? Thanks

rudestuff 3rd Feb 2018 14:48

Sure. A PPL in your case is a stepping stone to a CPL. The rules say that any ICAO PPL will do, therefore it makes sense to do an FAA PPL - especially if you are hour building in the States.

Yes, you can do an EASA PPL in the States, and many do. Probably because they think they have to...

A PPL in the US is 40 hours, one written and checkride. The licence is issued immediately, on the spot.

A PPL in Europe is 45 hours, 9 exams and a flight test THEN you have to do another 5 hours to fly at night. The licence is only issued once you have sent away your logbooks to the CAA. You cannot fly straight away (You can't hour build without a CFI signing you off - because you are still technically a student pilot - and you certainly can't carry passengers!)

Now for the IR: In Europe it is 55 hours, (40 sim and 15 multi) average price? £12,000
If you have an FAA IR, you can convert it in 15 hours for about £6,000
How much does an FAA IR cost? Well you're already renting the plane! - you only pay extra for the instructor and test, so $2000 will save you £6,000
The other option is CBIR: as long as you have 35 hours as PIC under IFR (which you will get hour building) - you only need to do 10 hours multi.

mustangsally 5th Feb 2018 15:19

This really does not have much to do with which school is best, but more with how to build hours at maybe a reasonable cost. After or for even that matter while obtaining a PPL look for a cheap single engine, to build up your time. Find an A&P that will supervise your work. A nice 95 knot or less cruiser, no need to go any faster, slower maybe even more of an advantage. Some airframe with maybe a thousand hours or so till TBO would be ideal. Pick five or six tranangler routes and fly every day you can for three or more hours. Fly as much as you can every day. Get and your instructors ticket and let the school pay for some of your hours. The faster you log real hours, (no BIC flying) the cheaper and faster you will find that targeted right seat. When its time for multi and instrument work, cheaper to rent a simulator or aircraft.

coboltblue 18th Jan 2019 11:01

Hey Rudestuff

I have been doing a bit of research after reading you're posts, the concept of getting an FAA PPL then adding an IR seems like a great idea. I want to convert over after to EASA land to get the fATPL.

Is the process
1. FAA PPL
2. SEP/IR
3. Hour building (PIC - 100 hours) wearing a hood, at night, cross country.....
4. EASA ATPL theory + exams

Is there any point in doing the MEP/IR in the states?''

Thanks for your input on this forum, its enlightening

[/QUOTE]Now for the IR: In Europe it is 55 hours, (40 sim and 15 multi) average price? £12,000
If you have an FAA IR, you can convert it in 15 hours for about £6,000
How much does an FAA IR cost? Well you're already renting the plane! - you only pay extra for the instructor and test, so $2000 will save you £6,000
The other option is CBIR: as long as you have 35 hours as PIC under IFR (which you will get hour building) - you only need to do 10 hours multi.[/QUOTE]

oggers 18th Jan 2019 13:27


I did most of my flight instruction at Prairie Air Service in Benton, Kansas.
I did my civvy licences there. I have fond memories of that place and how Herb and Kathy looked after me and the other students. His standards are high for sure but the price and the hospitality would be difficult to beat. I would go back in a heartbeat. Florida it aint.

coboltblue 18th Jan 2019 13:52

Sounds good
 
I sent them an email asking for details, sounds great.


Originally Posted by oggers (Post 10364056)
I did my civvy licences there. I have fond memories of that place and how Herb and Kathy looked after me and the other students. His standards are high for sure but the price and the hospitality would be difficult to beat. I would go back in a heartbeat. Florida it aint.



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