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-   -   F/A-18 Super Hornet Lost Overboard Off CVN In Mediterranean (https://www.pprune.org/military-aviation/647722-f-18-super-hornet-lost-overboard-off-cvn-mediterranean.html)

RAFEngO74to09 10th Jul 2022 17:12

F/A-18 Super Hornet Lost Overboard Off CVN In Mediterranean
 
"NAPLES, Italy -- On July 8, 2022, an F/A-18 Super Hornet assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, embarked aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), blew overboard due to unexpected heavy weather in the Mediterranean Sea.

The carrier was conducting a replenishment-at-sea, which was safely terminated through established procedures.

All personnel aboard the ship are accounted for.

One Sailor received minor injuries while conducting operations during the unexpected heavy weather. The Sailor is in stable condition and expected to make a full recovery.

USS Harry S. Truman and embarked aircraft remain full mission capable.

Details and the cause of the incident are under investigation.

For questions related to this release, contact U.S. Naval Forces"

https://www.navy.mil/Press-Office/Pr...due-to-unexpe/

etudiant 10th Jul 2022 19:25


Originally Posted by RAFEngO74to09 (Post 11259326)
"NAPLES, Italy -- On July 8, 2022, an F/A-18 Super Hornet assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, embarked aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), blew overboard due to unexpected heavy weather in the Mediterranean Sea.

The carrier was conducting a replenishment-at-sea, which was safely terminated through established procedures.

All personnel aboard the ship are accounted for.

One Sailor received minor injuries while conducting operations during the unexpected heavy weather. The Sailor is in stable condition and expected to make a full recovery.

USS Harry S. Truman and embarked aircraft remain full mission capable.

Details and the cause of the incident are under investigation.

For questions related to this release, contact U.S. Naval Forces"

https://www.navy.mil/Press-Office/Pr...due-to-unexpe/

Thought that replenishment at sea was very much weather limited, so this is indeed a surprise.
The ships presumably have ongoing weather watch. Can someone help?

zambonidriver 10th Jul 2022 21:13

I have admittedly no knowledge of carrier operations but muss have been quite some weather for such a thing to happen 🤔

SpazSinbad 10th Jul 2022 21:21

Freak Rogue MOFOs WAVEs can come 'out of the blue' "unexpectedly" as per: Not only NOAH Knows but NO

What is a rogue wave? (noaa.gov)

WB627 10th Jul 2022 22:24

Gulf of Lyon??

etudiant 10th Jul 2022 22:39


Originally Posted by SpazSinbad (Post 11259409)
Freak Rogue MOFOs WAVEs can come 'out of the blue' "unexpectedly" as per: Not only NOAH Knows but NO

What is a rogue wave? (noaa.gov)

In the Mediterranean? Guess every ocean has its surprises.

SpazSinbad 10th Jul 2022 23:53

03 Mar 2010 Rogue Waves Kill Two On Mediterranean Cruise Ship : The Two-Way : NPR

etudiant 11th Jul 2022 00:29


Originally Posted by SpazSinbad (Post 11259457)

Impressive! Clearly I misunderestimated that body of water.
Separately, would the aircraft on deck not be tied down during replenishment?

SpazSinbad 11th Jul 2022 00:36

Flight ops occur during RAS evolutions. Many factors may determine this event for ships concerned. Any aircraft NOT BEING MOVED anywhere on the ship is always tied down. When being moved they are followed by deck crew with chocks. A classic case of a 'half-tied down A4G in the process of being moved by a flight deck tractor and aircraft handlers' went over the side in the big ditch between Oz & KiwiLand in 1979. There were other factors however the angry sea was part of the mix. Soon after the LARGE rotating RADAR on top of the island of MELBOURNE fell off, luckily over the stbd side and not onto the flight deck. The XO of a Brit Ship was lost in the raging storms during TASMINEX 79. The VF-805 Squadron 'brake man' ABATWL Krenn in the cockpit went over the side also - picked up by nearby destroyer rescue swimmer OK. He had a float coat. YAY!

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune....9a5b0ee47f.jpg

etudiant 11th Jul 2022 01:08


Originally Posted by SpazSinbad (Post 11259470)
Flight ops occur during RAS evolutions. Many factors may determine this event for ships concerned. Any aircraft NOT BEING MOVED anywhere on the ship is always tied down. When being moved they are followed by deck crew with chocks. A classic case of a 'half-tied down A4G in the process of being moved by a flight deck tractor and aircraft handlers' went over the side in the big ditch between Oz & KiwiLand in 1979. There were other factors however the angry sea was part of the mix. Soon after the LARGE rotating RADAR on top of the island of MELBOURNE fell off, luckily over the stbd side and not onto the flight deck. The XO of a Brit Ship was lost in the raging storms during TASMINEX 79. The VF-805 Squadron 'brake man' ABATWL Krenn in the cockpit went over the side also - picked up by nearby destroyer rescue swimmer OK. He had a float coat. YAY!

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune....9a5b0ee47f.jpg

Very illuminating, thank you! It helps to have these unexpected hazards explained by someone who has been there.

SpazSinbad 11th Jul 2022 01:35

I was not onboard MELBOURNE in 1979, however when onboard it was 'fun' to see inch tops of green Pacific swell wash down the catapult track whilst waiting for the GO! from the FDO. The Pacific Ocean is notorious for the long cycle swells. There is a classic section in a video about CVN flight ops with Hornets in the INDIAN OCEAN trying to accommodate these long cycle SWELLs, especially at night. A CVN deck is about 65 feet off the water while the MELBOURNE deck was about 37 feet (my approximations). There are photos of the tops of waves blowing down a CVN deck. Life on the bounding main. :}


etudiant 11th Jul 2022 01:58


Originally Posted by SpazSinbad (Post 11259491)
I was not onboard MELBOURNE in 1979, however when onboard it was 'fun' to see inch tops of green Pacific swell wash down the catapult track whilst waiting for the GO! from the FDO. The Pacific Ocean is notorious for the long cycle swells. There is a classic section in a video about CVN flight ops with Hornets in the Pacific trying to accommodate these SWELLs, especially at night. A CVN deck is about 65 feet off the water while the MELBOURNE deck was about 37 feet (my approximations). There are photos of the tops of waves blowing down a CVN deck. Life on the bounding main. :}

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNhCYIzOJ6g

Sadly blocked here in the USA by PBS, which apparently has copyright on some of the content. Your description however paints a clear picture.

SpazSinbad 11th Jul 2022 02:21

How 'bout this one and one: [They on the INDIAN OCEAN transiting from the Gulf to Perth Oz.] Above I had the impression the CVN was transiting the Pacific however it is clear they are somewhere on INDIAN Ocean. The two video halves below are the same as the full video apparently blocked above.



etudiant 11th Jul 2022 03:30

Thank you for these, sobering to see the real live pictures..
Wonder whether the various auto land systems have reduced the stress in the last few years.
Would certainly expect the Chinese to be working hard to make carrier operations more accessible.

SpazSinbad 11th Jul 2022 03:48

JPALS will have a limit for fully automatic landings, currently it is Sea State 5, plus there will be other weather conditions, how the carrier steers into wind to make any crosswind and other limits - also for the aircraft. Sea state - Wikipedia I did not make the title for this USS Kitty Hawk video:


zambonidriver 11th Jul 2022 06:15


Originally Posted by SpazSinbad (Post 11259457)

Still, wasn't a Nimitz-class carrier (which has a waterline of 134 ft (40.8 m)). But clearly it can also happen in the Mediterrenean sea.

SpazSinbad 11th Jul 2022 06:48

The last video above shows USS Kitty Hawk whilst Louise Majesty is now: MS Crown Iris - Wikipedia

911slf 11th Jul 2022 11:40

Freeboard?
 

Originally Posted by zambonidriver (Post 11259549)
Still, wasn't a Nimitz-class carrier (which has a waterline of 134 ft (40.8 m)). But clearly it can also happen in the Mediterrenean sea.

Is the height of the deck above water not called "freeboard"? Wikipedia says the beam of this class is 134 feet.

SpazSinbad 11th Jul 2022 12:05

"...Depending on its aircraft load, a carrier’s flight deck may sit as high as 60 feet above the waterline. Its hangar bay elevators lower swimmers to 30 feet from the waves—the equivalent of an Olympic diving platform—so leaping sailors risk a broken bone if not using good form. The USS Eisenhower issued instructions to prevent injuries by asking that the crew “practice to prevent injury from wrongful water entry.”..." Everyone in the Ocean! | Air & Space Magazine| Smithsonian Magazine

Sailvi767 11th Jul 2022 15:37

North Pacific about 1984. Deck moving up and down 20 feet. ¼ mile vis in heavy snow. Single Phantom airborne after Bear intercept. First two passes waived off for deck out of phase. Third pass trick or treat with 800 lbs of fuel. Traps successfully but slow to throttle back in the wires. Air Boss comes up and says”602 throttle back, your not a rookie out there”. 602 replies, “Boss, do I bother you when your taking a shit?”


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