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ORAC 27th Mar 2019 13:00

India Demonstrates Anti-Satellite
 
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...-a8841381.html

Mission Shakti: India shoots down live satellite in space, says PM Narendra Modi

India has shot down a live satellite in low-Earth orbit as part of a successful test of new missile technology, prime minister Narendra Modi has announced. The operation, dubbed Mission Shakti, makes India part of a “super league” of nations to have achieved such a feat, Mr Modi said, alongside the US, Russia and China.

The announcement comes weeks after India engaged in aerial clashes with Pakistan over the disputed border of Kashmir. “This new technology is not directed against any particular country,” the prime minister said.

The target of the test was “one of India’s existing satellites operating in lower orbit”, a foreign ministry source said, rather than an asset belonging to another country. Experts said a mini-satellite was put into low orbit one month ago, likely for this purpose.

Mr Modi’s address, which he trailed as an “important statement” on Twitter, was simultaneously broadcast on All-India Radio and all national TV stations.




57mm 27th Mar 2019 18:57

Nice to see the £300 million or so in foreign aid from us being put to good use.....

Lima Juliet 27th Mar 2019 20:34

I wonder if new missiles like BVRAAM Meteor or the Longe Range Engagement Weapon (LREW) under development has the ‘snap up’ for a low orbit satellite at 80km altitude?

Blossy 27th Mar 2019 21:32

Hope the trial went off without leaving any more space debris.

ORAC 27th Mar 2019 22:51


wonder if new missiles like BVRAAM Meteor or the Longe Range Engagement Weapon (LREW) under development has the ‘snap up’ for a low orbit satellite at 80km altitude?
At that altitude control surfaces are useless, you need reaction jets.

tartare 28th Mar 2019 01:53

Ground or air launched?

oldpax 28th Mar 2019 02:32

A new public toilet was opened recently in Delhi.Instructions on how to use within.Foreign aid at work!

jolihokistix 28th Mar 2019 02:44

Blossy mentions more space junk. I would expect that it has fallen somewhere, or if not, India will be stealing a march on China and leading the way in developing new technology for clearing up the mess from these.

Cat3508 28th Mar 2019 03:08

Meanwhile, how many million people are still living in slums, and scratching an existence by crawling through garbage dumps.

tartare 28th Mar 2019 05:24

I visited India in 2000 from Blighty with the then Ms T (a local) - on her way to become Mrs T.
We went back to Delhi, Agra, Jaipur, South Goa and Pune two years ago to see the extended fam - and let the kids meet the Indian cousins.
Big, big changes in that time.
Noticeable overall decreases in poverty (although still starkly evident in some places).
So the trope about misuse of foreign aid - rickshaws versus space programs etc. is a bit tired and intellectually lazy.
EDIT - see https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-47729568
The amount India spends on its space program amounts to about 0.4 per cent of it's annual budget.
It's a low cost space power.
Some more detail on Mission Shakti here:
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-03-...-down/10947246
And the amount you pongolians spend on Foreign aid each year - isn't it around 70p per 100 nicker earned, or around 0.7 per cent of GNI?
Or Just under 14 billion squids, of which a paltry 100 or so million goes to India?
Not exactly breaking the bank - is it!
They just squeak in on the list of top 10 donor recipients.

A_Van 28th Mar 2019 16:22

For internal use only. Trivial things like"national pride" and "we will show them". Only laymen could be surprised with such a trick in 2019. Anybody who can build and launch a medium range missile can "engineer" such a show. A target with an absolutely predictable trajectry (and probably specially enhanced RCS or IR "brightness") is a very easy one to hit.

ORAC 2nd Apr 2019 08:22

https://www.space.com/nasa-chief-con...lite-test.html

India's Anti-Satellite Test Created Dangerous Debris, NASA Chief Says

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said today (April 1) that India's recent anti-satellite test created 60 pieces of orbital debris big enough to track, 24 of which rise higher than the International Space Station's orbit around Earth.

Bridenstine had harsh words to say about India's test today in a NASA town hall meeting, saying that causing this type of risk to humans in space, and low Earth orbit operations, was unacceptable.

"That is a terrible, terrible thing, to create an event that sends debris in an apogee that goes above the International Space Station," Bridenstine said at the town hall meeting, which was livestreamed on NASA TV. "And that kind of activity is not compatible with the future of human spaceflight that we need to see happen“........

A_Van 3rd Apr 2019 06:21

Graphical representation of the post-hit evolution of debris:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pzht...ature=youtu.be

Blossy 3rd Apr 2019 20:09

I find the graphical representation confusing. It seems the debris only went out sideways. Surely some parts went both forewards and aft?

Load Toad 4th Apr 2019 02:50


Originally Posted by 57mm (Post 10431659)
Nice to see the £300 million or so in foreign aid from us being put to good use.....

They don't get that.

No money goes to the govt of India

~ 98M goes to NGO and projects for education /women's rights / malnutrition / environmental etc - and the figure is dropping.

Imagegear 4th Apr 2019 03:49


Originally Posted by Load Toad (Post 10438160)
They don't get that.

No money goes to the govt of India

~ 98M goes to NGO and projects for education /women's rights / malnutrition / environmental etc - and the figure is dropping.

Well if our 98M goes to education /women's rights / malnutrition / environmental etc, then it's obvious that the Indian Government can redirect any budget for this, elsewhere. :ugh:

IG

ion_berkley 4th Apr 2019 05:22


Originally Posted by Blossy (Post 10437946)
I find the graphical representation confusing. It seems the debris only went out sideways. Surely some parts went both forewards and aft?

Fragments went in many directions, but must worryingly and annoyingly, a significant debris field extends to much higher orbits encompassing the entire LEO altitude range. Fresh observation by a close friend released today: Indian anti-satellite debris measured with the EISCAT Tromsø Radar

pba_target 4th Apr 2019 06:09


Originally Posted by Imagegear (Post 10438171)
Well if our 98M goes to education /women's rights / malnutrition / environmental etc, then it's obvious that the Indian Government can redirect any budget for this, elsewhere. :ugh:

IG

I rather think the point is that it funds things the Indian government would not fund regardless... Facepalm

Recc 4th Apr 2019 10:10


Originally Posted by ion_berkley (Post 10438191)
Fragments went in many directions, but must worryingly and annoyingly, a significant debris field extends to much higher orbits encompassing the entire LEO altitude range. Fresh observation by a close friend released today


Though worth bearing in mind that even in the worst case scenario, the debris cannot have a perigee that is higher than the impact point of 280km. Somewhat irresponsible, but not a problem that will persist for any great length of time.

beardy 4th Apr 2019 13:27


Though worth bearing in mind that even in the worst case scenario, the debris cannot have a perigee that is higher than the impact point of 280km.
I don't follow either the Newtonian logic, nor the relevance of this. Would you be so kind as to expand please? Or did NASA get it wrong?


In the sharpest rebuke to date by a U.S. government official, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine criticized India’s recent anti-satellite test April 1, saying it created debris that posed a threat to the International Space Station. During a town hall meeting with NASA employees, Bridenstine was asked about the March 27 test, dubbed “Mission Shakti,” where a ground-launched missile struck the Microsat-R satellite in an orbit less than 300 kilometers high. The Indian government said the low altitude of the test minimized the amount of long-lived debris. Bridenstine, though, said that the test did produce some debris placed into higher orbits, including those above that of the ISS, which orbits at an altitude of about 410 kilometers. He said 400 pieces of debris had been identified from the test, 60 of which are large enough to be tracked by U.S. military assets, such as radars. “Of those 60, we know that 24 of them are going above the apogee of the International Space Station,” he said. “That is a terrible, terrible thing, to create an event that sends debris into an apogee that goes above the International Space Station. And that kind of activity is not compatible with the future of human spaceflight.”


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