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White oleos

Old 24th Jun 2020, 11:42
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White oleos

Was watching the Orange one climb onto Marine One on t'Telly last night, and reflecting on the spotless white wheel-hubs and oleos.
No-doubt checked by a Marine with white gloves every morning at Quantico or Andrews before it heads to the South Lawn.
But it got me thinking.
Why do so many aircraft have white oleos?
Helicopters, fast jets, airliners...
Is it because white is the best colour to show up leaking fluids?
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Old 24th Jun 2020, 12:35
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IIRC on the Sea Harrier they were light grey (as with the rest of the U/C)...but the reason you have stated seems a fair and logical assumption to me!

Last edited by 622; 24th Jun 2020 at 12:52.
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Old 24th Jun 2020, 12:52
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Originally Posted by 622 View Post
IIRC on the Sea Harrier they were light grey (as with the rest of the U/C)...but the reason you has stated seams a fair and logical assumption to me!
Perhaps it's a stitch-up....

Jack
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Old 24th Jun 2020, 12:53
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... I blaym mi inglysh teechar!

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Old 24th Jun 2020, 13:19
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Had a cracked nose one on an SF260 and it allowed the grease weeping to be seen easier,
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Old 24th Jun 2020, 13:46
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Didn't quite get you to start with, but on checking I know what you mean.

The oleo's are not white, the U/C leg is, the oleo (which can't be seen) will be the same as every other aircraft and that is chrome in colour. In the RAF training it as always referred to as the fescalised portion, which is actually a trade name.
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Old 24th Jun 2020, 14:10
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Thunderbird detailing
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Old 24th Jun 2020, 17:03
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The fescalised portion on an undercarriage (or any actuator or jack) is the shiny machined bit. Its not in the English dictionary as it comes from the Greek word fescalise which basically means 'without cheese'. Greek shepherds used the phrase 'fescalised portion' to describe the 'shaft' of a goat's penis (a delicacy in Greece) which was held held between the thumb and forefinger while the 'helmet portion' was dipped in a jar of Feta

This what Giggle threw up. After 46 years on the spanners ( and laptops) you still live and learn.
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Old 24th Jun 2020, 22:45
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https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Fescol
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Old 24th Jun 2020, 23:33
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Originally Posted by sturb199 View Post
Didn't quite get you to start with, but on checking I know what you mean.

The oleo's are not white, the U/C leg is, the oleo (which can't be seen) will be the same as every other aircraft and that is chrome in colour. In the RAF training it as always referred to as the fescalised portion, which is actually a trade name.
Not correct, the oleo strut is the complete shock absorber unit, not just the fescalised portion, this is attached and forms part of the undercarriage. Often they slot up inside the undercarriage leg as shown in that image, or can be trailing link types. I probably overhaul 1 a month lol.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oleo_strut
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 00:27
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Originally Posted by Nolongerin View Post
... Greek shepherds used the phrase 'fescalised portion' to describe the 'shaft' of a goat's penis (a delicacy in Greece) which was held held between the thumb and forefinger while the 'helmet portion' was dipped in a jar of Feta...
Jeez! that information has damaged me. I'll never look at an oleo the same way again.
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 04:56
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If I'd had any idea what my innocent question about Marine One's wheels would provoke...
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 06:26
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Originally Posted by JustinHeywood View Post
Jeez! that information has damaged me. I'll never look at an oleo the same way again.
Me too - sounds like a lot of cock to me, and I'll never look at a goat the same way again.....

Jack
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 09:14
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Me too, Feta of all things, a nice runny Brie would be much better
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 09:59
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My entire air fleet in the 1970s had silver undercarriages - oleos, struts, the lot. Mind you, they were all 1:72 scale, and the only cheese I knew was Dairylea triangles. Innocent days, no goat's cheese...
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 10:02
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Yes BB - many 'classic' jets had silver U/C bays and legs etc
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 11:46
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Read that as White Oreos, disappointed at the lack of chocolate content in here.
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 15:00
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In 1987/88 I was loaned by British Aerospace, to Pilatus Aircraft in Stans, primarily to work on engine problems on the RSAF PC9 aircraft that were being built and delivered at the time. In the office where I worked there were two engineers who were also tug pilots at the gliding club based on the airfield there. Herman was our manager and was a real live wire, everything had to be done at top speed. George was a stress man and was extremely thorough and methodical but took ages to finish any job. One Monday morning Herman rushed into the office, before George arrived, and said I must tell you what happened at the gliding club yesterday. I was also a glider pilot and instructor at the time so I was the first to be told. Herman had observed George doing the daily pre-flight inspection of the tug and he was obviously concerned about the nose leg oleo. He watched as George wiped his finger along the leg, tasted it and then looked even more puzzled. George walked over to Herman and said "I am very concerned about the tug nose leg. It seems to be leaking fluid but it is more like water than oil. I have tried tasting it and it seems quite salty which is really strange, why would there be salt water in an oleo strut" Herman replied "Didn't you see that dog pissing on it a few minutes ago?"

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Old 25th Jun 2020, 20:20
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It was always stated in AvP 970 that such bays were white (or light coloured) to aid inspections. Imagine being out on the pan one dark night with your torch if the bays were black or dark.
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 23:44
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Ah hah.
That sounds like a more logical explanation.
Yes, considering the amount of gubbins inside a lot of u/c bays (hydraulic lines, cylinders etc) - that makes sense.
Still struggling to get images of goats knob cheese out of my mind...

Last edited by tartare; 26th Jun 2020 at 00:20.
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