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Miss Velma's engine failure and crash landing at Duxford from the cockpit

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Miss Velma's engine failure and crash landing at Duxford from the cockpit

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Old 18th May 2018, 10:40
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Miss Velma's engine failure and crash landing at Duxford from the cockpit

And post accident review, i know its stretching the military side but it is a fascinating insight.


https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/...irport-landing



.

Last edited by NutLoose; 18th May 2018 at 12:11.
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Old 18th May 2018, 11:21
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What a fantastic video and training aid.
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Old 18th May 2018, 12:05
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Thanks Nutty, haven't had a chance to listen to the whole interview yet but I'd suggest also posting it on Accidents and Close Calls section.

What an introduction to warbird display flying and how well he handled it.

Miss Velma is apparently well on her way to flying again in the US and hopefully will be back here in time for Flying Legends in July.
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Old 18th May 2018, 13:03
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Brilliant video, don't you just love those GoPros!

And a great analysis to boot, I'm going to be watching that a few times just to pick up all the learning points.
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Old 18th May 2018, 14:02
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Even after touchdown, and with straw flying everywhere, he’s still “Aviating”

I shall watch in full later. Good link, and perfectly relevant here IMO.
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Old 18th May 2018, 14:28
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Originally Posted by MPN11 View Post
Even after touchdown, and with straw flying everywhere, he’s still “Aviating”
Exactly!

Having now watched the whole thing, he seems a very clear thinking individual and certainly an excellent speaker. This should definitely be shared as widely as possible.

Look forward to seeing him flying her at Duxford in July!
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Old 18th May 2018, 14:44
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Glad no injuries. Strange the AAIB report on this accident to a G registered aircraft stops short with "suspected carburettor fault" and investigation in USA. You can actually see the fuel pressure fall to zero and recover in time with the engine cuts and recoveries. The actual position of the tank feed selector can also be clearly seen in several frames. However, I cannot see the booster pump switch.

OAP
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Old 18th May 2018, 14:55
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Just watched that video. I remember the incident well and the gut sinking feeling as I saw the aircraft disappear from view behind the hangar. Also the relief when it came through that the pilot was OK.

Great video Nutloose, Thanks for sharing.
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Old 18th May 2018, 15:13
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Nutloose (#1),

Fascinating ! 74 years ago last February I was in his shoes. Like him, I did (could?) not assume the worst at first, and kidded myself that "the engine's OK" - it wasn't ! Putting the gear down (before a landing on firm ground is "in the bag") is a no-no, but his ATC was only trying to help. Anyway, he remembered later, and got it up when it was obvious that he wouldn't make the airfield. Well flown, Sir !

At least, he finished up with the thing in one piece, and walked away from it. I left mine in bits strewn along a quarter mile of the Arakan, and they had to carry us out - both alive but not kicking much.

Puzzled: did I hear mention of "eject" ? From a P.51 ? Surely not ! Would dearly have liked to try one (with the Packard Merlin of course), to compare with the Spitfires I knew. (Silly me - NOTHING can be as good as a Spit!)

Danny,
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Old 19th May 2018, 08:19
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Excellent video, thanks for linking to it.

Lots of really open and honest discussion. Is that interview available as a download? I'd really like to use that for our students.
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Old 19th May 2018, 09:01
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Very Good,

He doesn't seem to mention but I wonder if he did a standard circuit and if so would he have preferred to do a tighter one?

If I had been in a similar spot (and blessed with thinking time and a level head!) I'd have kept it tight and accepted a (much) reduced runway length

Better to take the end fence at 50 rather than the front fence at 150!
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Old 19th May 2018, 11:34
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A very interesting point regarding the added safety provided by retractable gear in a single engine aircraft and stopping in around a football pitch length.
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Old 19th May 2018, 15:52
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Originally Posted by typerated View Post
Very Good,

He doesn't seem to mention but I wonder if he did a standard circuit and if so would he have preferred to do a tighter one?

If I had been in a similar spot (and blessed with thinking time and a level head!) I'd have kept it tight and accepted a (much) reduced runway length

Better to take the end fence at 50 rather than the front fence at 150!
If you look carefully at the vid, he was tight and the in cockpit vid looks like 75 degrees of bank and still would have been lucky to make the grass. Certainly, any powered approach will fall short if power is lost. Overall, a great pity that the M11 is quite where it is!

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Old 19th May 2018, 16:04
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Three's down and safe. All I could hear on the audio. Great discussion after. @NutLoose, nice find, thanks!
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Old 19th May 2018, 17:01
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Originally Posted by Onceapilot View Post
If you look carefully at the vid, he was tight and the in cockpit vid looks like 75 degrees of bank and still would have been lucky to make the grass. Certainly, any powered approach will fall short if power is lost. Overall, a great pity that the M11 is quite where it is!
As noted in the interview, with power coming and going, the constant recalculation of options was decidedly challenging!
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Old 19th May 2018, 17:25
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If I knew I had but 1% of his coolness I would be a 100% happier man! And given that flight safety is EVERYONEs business I would suggest that this vid is essential viewing for anyone working in aviation. Aircraft bent but fixable, pilot walks away. Total result. Buy that man a pint. Several, in fact.
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Old 19th May 2018, 18:20
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A rider to my #9:
Putting the gear down (before a landing on firm ground is "in the bag") is a no-no,
Only holds good for tail-draggers. For modern nosewheels, there was a discussion long ago (on Tee Emm or its postwar successor, whatever its name was). The consensus was "DOWN, BOY, DOWN" - as the modern swept wings come in at a higher angle of attack, with no wheels the tail will hit first and slam you down hard, doing your spine no good at all.

Anybody like to add anything ?
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Old 19th May 2018, 21:05
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No OAP - I meant not going as far back on downwind ( but stay wide enough that you are not cramped).

I have no idea with the performance of a Mustang but my 'eyecrometer' says I'd have been planning on base less than 100 yards beyond the motorway - planning to touch down midfield .

If you are not cramped downwind It also gives you many more options as you turn base/final

If you can't stop (normally) by the end fence you are at least going much slower and can ground loop or pull up the wheels (good idea on a Mustang?)?
Even taking the end fence at slow speed is much better than taking the front fence at 150!

I saw somebody in a similar position make a similar approach (disappearing down on a long downwind) then literally brushed foliage with his gear as he struggled to get back! He then stopped in about 1/3 the runway!
This is essentially my point of people 'flying type'
Made me think of what I would do anyway!
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Old 19th May 2018, 23:14
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Instead of any discussion of how tight the circuit was I might personally have pointed at the field then considered a downwind landing.
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Old 20th May 2018, 06:35
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Problem with that scenario is you would then be approaching 90 degrees to the runway with the crowdline on the other side of it.
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