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100th aniversary of the Royal Air Force today

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100th aniversary of the Royal Air Force today

Old 30th Nov 2017, 17:55
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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I read somewhere that there was a proposal for new ranks in the RAF to have this structure:
Ensign, Lieutenant, Flight-Leader, Squadron-Leader, Reeve, Banneret, Fourth-Ardian, Third-Ardian, Second-Ardian, Ardian, Air Marshal.
A further suggestion was a variation on the above:
Ensign, Lieutenant, Flight-Leader, Squadron-Leader, Wing-Leader, Leader, Flight Ardian, Squadron Ardian, Wing Ardian, Ardian, Air Marshal.

Ardian
Reeve
Banneret
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Old 30th Nov 2017, 18:44
  #42 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
 
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I understood it was due to the grease applied to the exposed ferrous parts of embarked aircraft being known by the sailors as 'crabfat'.
From the material I have read it was because the blue of the original uniform matched the ointment the RN medics to kill the “crabs” the ratings encountered “down below” so to speak....
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 07:53
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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I agree with that one, it was known as 'blue unction.'
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 11:29
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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I have certainly been referred to as a "penguin" by our brown clad brethren, (even though I was never in the WRAF!) and the term was often used by rock-apes to refer to non-Regiment RAF personnel, but I never knew the origins.

Warmtoast's cutting proves that it was there from the outset, but doesn't explain - "why penguins?"

Ricardian - I mentioned that system in post #29. Only ever made "flight leader" myself, although the only time I led a flight was when I was a flying officer (at which time I didn't fly!).
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 13:13
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Penguin = Flightless bird.

Alternatively:

Penguin = All flap and no fly.

The Rocks may think the term theirs to refer to non Rocks, but my late Father (a wartime glider pilot and post war fighter pilot) always said that the term refered to the non flyers of the RAF.

Given that the Rocks are only 75 years young, I'd suggest the aircrew use of the term well predates theirs!
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 15:10
  #46 (permalink)  
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RFC Crossley - Page 4 - Pre WW2 vehicles - HMVF - Historic Military Vehicles Forum

According to the Oxford Dictionary a "penguin" was "a non-flying flapper in the RAF"

PRECEPTS FOR PENGUINS.

By One of the W.R.A.F.

1. Thou shalt have no dealings with Cadets 1 Thou shalt not give them the " glad eye " ; nor seek to attract them with thy smiles—lest thou be called flighty”, always remembering that thou art a Penguin and canst not fly.

2. Thou shalt not try to find favour in the eyes of any man by offering unto him a " second helping," for I say unto you : He that can eat a ' second helping' in these days loveth dearly his ' Little Mary,' and can have no love for another."

3. Thou shalt not exceed thy rations, for sufficient unto the day is the food thereof as allowed by the good Lord Rhondda; and shouldst thou eat more than thy allotted share, then surely someone shall receive short measure.

4. Thou shalt not smash the crockery, but walk warily and watch thy step, lest thy foot slip, and thou shouldst break 101 plates. If such misfortune should overtake thee, then shalt thou throw up thine arms, crying, " Oh Lord! Oh Lord! What have I done ? ".

5. Eight inches from the ground shalt thou wear thy frock - not more than these eight inches—nor shalt thou wear a lemon-coloured stocking, lest, perchance the Cadets should see a golden calf (a well-fatted one withal), and, like the Israelites of old, should fall down and worship it.

6. Thou shalt not wear a " trench coat," lest thou be taken for an officer, and thy comrades beholding thee should say: "Lo! Here is our officer." And they would give thee the salute, which would be a pity, for it would be wasted.

7. If thou shouldst meet a motor transport driver wearing the cloth of an officer, then shalt thou turn thine eyes away and give not the salute, for she is not an officer! (No, certainly not.)

8. Thou shalt not powder thy face I If thou wouldst secure unto thyself a husband, and one that is a soldier, I say unto thee, he that hath already " faced the powder " careth nought for the powdered face. It appeareth unto him even as a camouflage!

9. Thou shalt at all times wear thy uniform—the coat, the hat, the frock that has been given unto thee. Thou shalt not receive on Saturday morning a parcel bearing the legend "Laundry," which containeth not the snowy raiment, but, rather, a suit of blue serge, and a blouse that is of silk, to be donned secretly and at night when thou goest out to meet thy friends.

10. At the hour of nine-thirty shalt thou be in thy billet - not later than this. If, perchance, thy watch hath deceived thee, or the tram hath broken down, seek not to enter thy hostel with loud knocking on the door and ringing of bells; but, rather, get thee to the back of the house, where thou mayest enter by the scullery window—silently and without noise - having a care that thou disturbeth (?) not the slumbers of those that are within. Then " all shall be well with thee."

11. At least once a month shalt thou have thy photograph taken (by Breach or another) that thou mayest send it to thy relatives and friends in the north, the south, the east, and the west, that they may behold thee in thy uniform, and say unto the neighbours : " See 1 This is my daughter, and she is a Penguin!”

12. And when it shall come to pass that the war shall be over, thou canst return to thy home, feeling proud that thou hast done " thy bit " for King and Country, for in ministering to the needs of these Cadets thou hast helped in a measure to bring about the end of the Great War. Wherefore, go thy way and dwell in peace. Thou hast done well, my child !

Thou hast done well! - Roosters and Fledglings.

ROOSTERS AND FLEDGLINGS : THE MONTHLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE CADETS, CIRCULATING IN ALL WINGS OF THE R.A.F. CADET BRIGADE AND SCHOOLS OF AERONAUTICS (LBY E.J. 1041)



https://www.abaa.org/book/1016085739
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 17:19
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I was given to believe that the term "crab" came from the old crab fatting apparently used to caulk between deck planks -it being the same colour as the RAF blue serge.
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 21:48
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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It brings it all home when you think the RAF is 100 years old and Puma has nearly been in service for 50% of that time.
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Old 2nd Dec 2017, 13:32
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Nutty

The Hercules is over 50yrs old as an RAF type - since Aug 67 so it is 4 years older than Puma!
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Old 3rd Dec 2017, 06:33
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iRaven,

The Hercules in RAF service now are NOT the same as the ones you are talking about.
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Old 3rd Dec 2017, 11:50
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Haraka View Post
I was given to believe that the term "crab" came from the old crab fatting apparently used to caulk between deck planks -it being the same colour as the RAF blue serge.
Haraka,

I ‘m happy to be corrected on this, but my understanding is that the term ‘crab’ isn’t derived from the stuff used for deck caulking. You’re quite right that ‘crab’ is a contraction of the old term ‘crabfat’ - my late father (ex Navy) used the latter term all the time. However, my understanding is that the original ‘crabfat’ was a paste that British troops used in WW1 to combat lice infestations in their nether regions. This paste was a blue grey colour. When the RAF uniforms appeared, using a blue grey serge (originally manufactured for a massive contract for pre-revolutionary Russian troops) the similarity in colour (‘crabfat blue’) immediately led to the term being applied to the wearers.

As an aside, deck planking was traditionally caulked with a mixture of tar and shredded hemp called ‘oakum’

Again, I’m happy to be corrected on this one - there is a lot of ‘urban myth’ stuff out there.

Hope this helps, best regards as ever to all my good RAF friends out there.

Engines
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Old 3rd Dec 2017, 12:08
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by pr00ne View Post
iRaven,

The Hercules in RAF service now are NOT the same as the ones you are talking about.
Neither are the Pumas, the 'same' - no need to shout.
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Old 3rd Dec 2017, 13:56
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Thanks Jindabyne, you beat me to it. I tried to use “as an RAF type” to ensure this wouldn’t be brought up, hey ho...
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Old 3rd Dec 2017, 14:40
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But the Mk 2 Puma is a converted Mk 1 Puma. The Mk 4 and 5 Hercules are brand new very different aircraft and cannot physically be converted from the Mk1. And I wasn't shouting, it's called emphasis.
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Old 3rd Dec 2017, 16:06
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Still NOT the 'same' though!
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Old 3rd Dec 2017, 17:59
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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Plus a C-130, Hercules or Fat Albert is still the same type...
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Old 3rd Dec 2017, 21:44
  #57 (permalink)  

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Always said that the only thing that can replace an old Hercules is a new Hercules.
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Old 4th Dec 2017, 00:34
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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Taken as an overall type, I dont think anything has achieved longer service than the Canberra which was in RAF service from 1952 to 2006. Taken as an individual mark, the PR9 survived from 1960 until 39 Squadron disbanded in 2006. Put into perspective, it's a bit like me seeing Vickers Vimys still in service when I first joined in 1964!
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Old 4th Dec 2017, 13:00
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But the Mk 2 Puma is a converted Mk 1 Puma. The Mk 4 and 5 Hercules are brand new very different aircraft and cannot physically be converted from the Mk1. And I wasn't shouting, it's called emphasis.
Yep, that is why I didn't add the Herc, as they are still the same Pumas, wear the same serial numbers, just refurbed, the Hercs however are total newbuilds.


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Last edited by NutLoose; 4th Dec 2017 at 13:11.
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