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When did "Reheat" become "Afterburner" ?

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When did "Reheat" become "Afterburner" ?

Old 1st Jan 2019, 19:58
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This is indeed an unusual Americanism because it does not consist of three words, which appears to be a formal requirement in American "Aircraft Technical Manuals". So for example, the AWACS radar does not have Tilt, but an "Elevation Command Angle". The console (Mission-crew Work Station) does not have a keyboard, but an "Alphanumeric Entry Device" and so forth. Indeed, the occasional aberration of this rule has been corrected in the mid-life update, where the older "Situation Display" has been replaced by the "Primary AWACS Display". Needless to say, this approach to military systems certainly meets the requirement for a surfeit of acronyms.
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Old 1st Jan 2019, 20:07
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Originally Posted by 57mm View Post
.... Much excitement once in a formation fly past of Lightnings, as the leader called "Reheat, reheat go....now"
Reminded me of the Javelin 4-ship in immaculate echelon joining the circuit, although that ws "Break - Break - Go - Now." Much wobbling of Javelins ensued!
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Old 1st Jan 2019, 20:10
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Having touched on 3 character designators, the V-Force was there over 60 years ago with NBS, BNS, NBC, H2S and then numbers that any nav rad has engraved in memory 595, 585, 301, 343, 626.
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Old 1st Jan 2019, 21:23
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This is indeed an unusual Americanism because it does not consist of three words
TLA.......
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Old 1st Jan 2019, 22:31
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The Typhoon uses 'Reheat' often shortened to 'RHT' in its documents.

Mr Vice.
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Old 1st Jan 2019, 22:38
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reheat is a thermodynamics term. Its not limited to aircraft engines. Afterburner is a form of reheat which is used in aircraft engines.

If your talking about aircraft engines both are correct. And septic engineers know very well what they are and how one is shall we say the family name for a solution and the other is a individual solution for the effect.
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 00:18
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I won't mention turbo superchargers then, it'll just confuse you ohh I just did.

BTW they used a primitive reheat on large piston engines
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 00:30
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Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
I won't mention turbo superchargers then, it'll just confuse you ohh I just did.
There are various types of 'superchargers' - it's legitimate to call one type 'turbo' to differentiate it from the others.

Reheat and afterburner both clearly indicate what's being communicated, and you don't need to be overly familiar with the nuances of the language to clearly understand. That's often not the case when comparing the American and British versions of the English language. For example, when referring to the luggage carrying compartment of an auto, I've always thought 'trunk' made more sense than 'boot'.

Last edited by tdracer; 2nd Jan 2019 at 00:52.
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 00:33
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Originally Posted by LOMCEVAK View Post
We are, indeed, two nations divided by a
common language ....
Funny how the word 'common' comes up when talking about the yanks! Don't forget they are a classless society, i.e. they have no class(es)

Reheat is standard English, and after-burner is simplified English, or American!

tally-ho chaps!
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 01:02
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Obviously others at the eastern side of the pond may say “Gate” or even “Carrots” when they want to use the “loud levers”.

”Cookers” and “Heaters” also, but the latter may also refer to IR missiles.
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 01:27
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Originally Posted by Lima Juliet View Post
Obviously others at the eastern side of the pond may say “Gate” or even “Carrots” when they want to use the “loud levers”.

”Cookers” and “Heaters” also, but the latter may also refer to IR missiles.
Just make sure you put it out over the Tannoy for the passengers!
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 01:53
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When you consider that it’s a process involving the ignition of large quantities of fuel and resulting in a 1000 mph efflux with purple/orange flames, shock diamonds and deafening roaring, crackling noises - ‘reheat’ is really just another example of charming British understatement, isn’t it?

Whereas ‘afterburner’ is somewhat more picturesque and descriptive, and also just fine as far as I’m concerned.

Last edited by itsnotthatbloodyhard; 2nd Jan 2019 at 06:40.
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 07:46
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I've always thought 'trunk' made more sense than 'boot'.
Not when, in reality, you put your trunk into the boot!
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 07:47
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When I was doing some training in the states the instructor said the thrust levers were connected to the " big round things" That's the only tech you need to know.!
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 08:54
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From:- Bringing the Future Within Reach: Celebrating 75 Years of NASA John H. Glenn
Research Center by Robert S Arrighi, National Aeronautics and Space

(sorry about image but I can't work out how to copy/paste text from google books)

Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory (AERL)
Altitude Wind Tunnel (AWT)
NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (Lewis)


This is further up the page - Man vs Fire!!


Man vs Fire

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...RieQsC&pg=PA68
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 09:19
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Just reading the preamble on this thread and noticed:
Originally Posted by dixi188 View Post
Undercarriage and Landing Gear?
Any Brit Air Trafficker, of a certain age, will quote to you:
"Your landing gear appears down and locked'
Or
"Your port undercarriage does not appear to be down"
(Or words to that effect)
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 10:01
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Confusing one for me Is LIGHT OFF call during engine start. Especially when during the start you are also monitoring warning lights that you also expect to go OFF.
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 10:24
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as correctly described earlier in the thread, afterburner is the name given to the mechanism and extended tailpipe paraphernalia that adds the fuel and stabilises the result, which is reheat, ergo
you engage afterburner to produce reheat.

Ttfn
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 11:43
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Originally Posted by turbroprop View Post
Confusing one for me Is LIGHT OFF call during engine start. Especially when during the start you are also monitoring warning lights that you also expect to go OFF.
The call used to be LIGHT UP. Terminology drift?
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Old 2nd Jan 2019, 12:10
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Man vs Fire.

That man is wearing no safety equipment!

What was he thinking...
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