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"Protector" is to be Certifiable Predator B

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"Protector" is to be Certifiable Predator B

Old 28th Apr 2016, 10:35
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"Protector" is to be Certifiable Predator B

As expected.

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...placem-424667/

If flying them in the UK, will they be able to squeeze them into Waddington or will they operate them from a remote base (maybe in North Wales, or North East Scotland.......)
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Old 28th Apr 2016, 10:47
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Will be interesting to see if the CAA accepts that TCAS and DRR is sufficient "Equivalence" to a manned aircraft under the CAP 722 definition.....
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Old 28th Apr 2016, 12:13
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The CAA doesn't have the final call though does it?

EAP
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Old 28th Apr 2016, 12:34
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Nave maybe, but genuine question nonetheless:

........how is controlling a UAS from a remote box on the ground different from controlling an aircraft from a cockpit under IFR?

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Batco
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Old 28th Apr 2016, 13:21
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I'd imagine the principal concern is loss of contact with the aircraft
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Old 28th Apr 2016, 21:41
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I spoke with a couple of pilots who flew the 'Dragon Lady' and they told me about a trial where the Global Hawk and the U2 were given the same task, the comms were then cut to both assets. The U2 flew back to Beale the Global Hawk went to a default position until it ran out of fuel and crashed.
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Old 28th Apr 2016, 23:00
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Batco,
Not naive at all - provided you only fly the UAV in IFR / Controlled Airspace. Class G with all the non transponding, low RCS users is another matter. If one blunders into a microlight and kills someone I think the CAA would be very concerned.....
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Old 29th Apr 2016, 10:43
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I posted this link on the SDSR thread 2 days before the Flight article:

Reaper to be replaced by: "Certifiable Predator B"
This link discusses the Detect and Avoid capability planned.
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Old 29th Apr 2016, 12:21
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So KPax the global hawk owners were happy to lose an airframe demonstrating a predictable event?
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Old 29th Apr 2016, 12:44
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NF,
Indeed it did - but TCAS will only work against co-operative traffic and most small microlights, gliders and ultralights have very small RCS signatures. Hence, in Class G Open FIR, does the DRR have enough sensitivity to detect these platforms at a range that permits the UAV to successfully avoid a collision? This is key. We can plan to fly the UAV only in CA (effectively segregated from non-cooperative aircraft) but if they suffer a power loss or are re-routed for weather, they may enter Class G. The CAA will need, under CAP 722, to be satisfied that the UAV has the equivalent detection of the lookout from an equivalent manned aircraft if it does so, or someone has to "own" the risk.
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Old 30th Apr 2016, 14:49
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Challenging, particularly when you think of gliders, which tend to not fly in straight lines at constant altitude.
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Old 30th Apr 2016, 17:46
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In Class G, could they claim any credit for forward look-out with the FLIR?
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Old 1st May 2016, 09:07
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Why would the RAF want to fly Protector in the UK?

It can be controlled from 'anywhere' - what would be the advantage of flying it in UK airspace?

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Old 1st May 2016, 19:12
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Sun Who,

Perhaps contingencies might arise at some point in future. For instance, dealing with bolshie shipyard workers, who think the world owes them a living, who try to sabotage the commissioning of one of HM's aircraft carriers !
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Old 1st May 2016, 19:28
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Never Fretter

No credit for FLIR unless it forms part of an overall standalone sense and avoid system.

The days of Predator flying in UK Class G airspace, will as with any other UAS, be many years away. Consequently operations will be in a know traffic environment, ie controlled or segregated airspace (currently UK Danger Areas). For what it will be doing in UK airspace that shouldn't be a problem.

If some national emergency arose that needed its services outside normal controlled/segregated airspace, a temporary restricted/danger area could be established to accommodate it
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Old 1st May 2016, 20:08
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What type of national emergency might require the use of Protector in the UK?

Sun.
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Old 2nd May 2016, 01:15
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Originally Posted by KPax View Post
I spoke with a couple of pilots who flew the 'Dragon Lady' and they told me about a trial where the Global Hawk and the U2 were given the same task, the comms were then cut to both assets. The U2 flew back to Beale the Global Hawk went to a default position until it ran out of fuel and crashed.

They were yanking your chain KPax...the Global Hawk will return to Beale or its pre-designated destination just as a manned aircraft will.
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Old 18th Nov 2016, 07:28
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UK Seeks $1 Billion Deal for Remotely Piloted Aircraft

LONDON - Up to 26 Certifiable Predator B remotely piloted vehicles could be purchased by Britain’s Royal Air Force according to a US State Department notification to Congress of the proposed Foreign Military Sales deal.

The British have requested the purchase of 16 General Atomics Certifiable Predator B vehicles along with an option for another 10, the Defense Security Cooperation Agency statement said. Twelve ground stations, with an option for a further four, and other equipment are also included in the proposed deal valued at $1 billion. The intention to purchase the machines was part of the 2015 strategic defense and security review. At the time it didn't detail the numbers, only saying more than 20 would be acquired.

The new vehicles will offer better endurance, more external stores stations and other benefits compared with the 10 General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper remotely piloted vehicles currently being operated by the Royal Air Force. The Reaper fleet is currently part of a larger RAF force striking terrorist targets in Iraq and Syria.

The new machines, currently in development, should also be able to operate in UK airspace, something the Reaper is not cleared to do. The armed Certifiable Predator, to be known as the Protector in British service, will replace the present Reaper fleet.

Subject to congressional approval, contract signature by the two sides is expected to be completed by early next year said a Ministry of Defence spokeswoman. The sale is the latest in a string of recent FMS deals with the British including Apache AH-64E attack helicopter and P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft purchases.
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Old 18th Nov 2016, 07:37
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Forgive what may be a silly question, but what does the 'Certifiable' bit of the name mean?
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Old 18th Nov 2016, 08:06
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Originally Posted by beardy View Post
Forgive what may be a silly question, but what does the 'Certifiable' bit of the name mean?
Certifiable to Defence Standard 00-970.
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