Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Military Aviation
Reload this Page >

Global Aviation Magazine : 60 Years of the Hercules

Military Aviation A forum for the professionals who fly military hardware. Also for the backroom boys and girls who support the flying and maintain the equipment, and without whom nothing would ever leave the ground. All armies, navies and air forces of the world equally welcome here.

Global Aviation Magazine : 60 Years of the Hercules

Old 12th Jun 2015, 14:18
  #3201 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Berkshire
Posts: 2
Devil Back on pprune

Mr M!!
How the devil?
Saladbar is offline  
Old 12th Jun 2015, 23:15
  #3202 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Wiltshire
Age: 67
Posts: 2,062
A little nostalgia

Apologies if it's been posted before, but a few minutes of K reminiscences;

http://youtu.be/2AOKc1dsVmo

Smudge
smujsmith is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 07:43
  #3203 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: sussex
Posts: 1,601
Null,
at the other end of the temperature scale were the 'enrichment' starts which certainly perked up the engine temps. I think we on the 'K' fleet initially misunderstood when this was to be used so may have used it rather more often than necessary. I am sure one of the tech posters can 'illuminate' this !
ancientaviator62 is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 09:00
  #3204 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Not far from a lot of solar panels.
Posts: 88
aa62

My post about No Fault Found with regard to high peak TIT during an engine start sequence was made with particular reference to the conditions prevailing at Changi (along with a mischievous dig at the FE involved ) .
Simply turning the aircraft into wind would often 'fix' this reported defect (here, I am referring to slight overtemps i.e. those recorded between 830-850 degrees C).
Unfortunately, the aircraft parking layouts at both Changi and Lyneham (especially Bays 5 to 8) along with those at some other other exotic operating bases proved less than ideal in certain wind conditions: coupled with an unfavourable wind direction and/or high ambient air temps, these were major factors in many of the large number of reported high start temps.
Null Orifice is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 12:10
  #3205 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: sussex
Posts: 1,601
Null,
appreciate the circumstances you describe. I understand the P and W engines on the early 747 a/c could be impossible to start if there was a brisk wind 'up the chuff' . We used to go from Changi to Korea in the winter and would have to use enrichment there as the Korean winters were very cold.
Neither the a/c nor ourselves appreciated the temperature difference.
Same could be said for a winter transit via Goose or Gander (all jokes welcome) down to Belize and return.
ancientaviator62 is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 12:14
  #3206 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: sussex
Posts: 1,601
Whist typing the latest post the REDS have just flown straight over the house. There were nine in two 'gaggles' of five, three and a singleton.
I wonder where they had been and were headed. Only a teeny thread drift !
ancientaviator62 is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 12:24
  #3207 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: wiltshire
Age: 61
Posts: 223
Heading towards London and Trooping the colour perhaps?
ksimboy is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 12:42
  #3208 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: sussex
Posts: 1,601
ksimboy,
of course, thank you. I should have realised but where had they been ? Here in W Sussex they went over the house from South to North give or take a degree or two. Very impressive.
ancientaviator62 is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 13:06
  #3209 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: South of the ex-North Devon flying club. North of Isca.
Age: 45
Posts: 155
Still not as impressive as the Barrows though!
Fluffy Bunny is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 16:11
  #3210 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Not far from a lot of solar panels.
Posts: 88
aa62

Regarding the harsh Korean winters, my one and only visit to that place was (I believe) in March when on a 48 Sqdn North Pacific trainer from Changi.
As the senior SVC for the trip (prior to the invention of the Ground Engineer), I had diligently carried out a route prep inspection on the chosen frame on the day prior to departure: I was just a little peeved to find we had been given a different frame for the trip when we arrived at 48 servicing control on the morning of departure.
The replacement frame was blessed with plenty of hours available for the trip but was otherwise a heap of junk, with several Acceptable Deferred Defects (ADDs) and some OOPS (Out of Phase Servicing) items including magnetic plug checks on the engines and prop oil levels to be checked while down the route. There were also several ominous entries in the F700 that hinted of a recent history of fuel gauge problems.

We arrived at Kimpo not long before sunset. Due to an ADD on a defective refuelling valve in the right hand external tank, and the lack of a volunteer from the aircrew, I was the guy selected (by me ) to open-line refuel the said tank. As the sun sank from the sky, the ambient air temp fell rapidly southward accompanied by a chilling breeze. Being incorrectly dressed for this sudden change in weather I decided to raid the infamous Arctic Pack for a Parka jacket. Imagine my joy on discovering they were all SMALL sized, whereas I was (still am!) a 'portly 40-something' in clothing store parlance.

The crew had departed to the comparative warmth of the ops/met/coffee bar with the captain wearing my service issue tie - I believe he still has it.
On the return leg from Guam our overnight stop was Yokota (Saturday night!). Here, the dreaded fuel gauge history caught up with us. The ever-helpful USAF ramp controller offered the assistance of a 'gauge man' who promptly asked me whereabout in the cargo compartment had we moved the fuel gauge test sockets! When told these were non-existent in the K, he offered his apologies and left us to it.

Signals between our driver and the folks who lived on the hill at Changi followed, as the aforesaid driver tried to negotiate a clearance to route back to Changi via Clark Field in the Phillipines , in order to circumvent some of the gauge problems. At some stage during the negotiations, the squadron commander became involved and (allegedly) politely invited our driver to get his a$$ back to base without further ado. Needless to say, on returning to Eastern Dispersal, the F700 was duly annotated to reflect the latest chapter in the fuel gauge saga.
Null Orifice is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 16:26
  #3211 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: uk
Posts: 226
NFF = Not Fxxxing Fixed!

When faced with repeated UTRFs we used to write in the 700 things like "After take-off ........"
WIDN62 is offline  
Old 13th Jun 2015, 18:37
  #3212 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Wiltshire
Age: 67
Posts: 2,062
Null,

"As the senior SVC for the trip (prior to the invention of the Ground Engineer)", a good post, but I'm sure that even you must realise that the Aircraft Ground Engineer was never invented, but a creation of logic and sensible thought. Now, I'm not trying to blow the GE trumpet (just for a change) so I will recount a trip I did, with an SVC, who "saved the day".

A Belize trip, diverted to return via Bermuda developed some pressurisation anomalies, and all the usual suspects proved to be sound. My SVC on the trip was an avionics SAC who had seen a similar problem back at LyneHenge, and offered his opinion. I struggle to remember it's name but just forward of the rear escape hatch was an antenna that had a pressure seal which was leaking (anyone know the antenna?). He suggested we send for a new seal and replace it, I had a can of half hour PRC, which I used to paint the inside of the whole of the antenna fit. It did the job on ground test, and the subsequent 12 hour leg back home. The SVC pointed the way, I reacted to the problem by ignoring the spares/delay route and getting Albert home. It may have been a different story had my SVC not been a Fairy, I could easily have missed the potential for that antenna to create a pressurisation problem.

Smudge
smujsmith is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 07:38
  #3213 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: sussex
Posts: 1,601
Null,
I seem to recall brake seal problems on the 'K' when going from hot Changi to freezing Kimpo. I have a recollection of hot air blowers being applied to said brakes. We used to take the Honour Guard up for changeover in Korea. I wonder if smudge arrived on the fleet before the wing mods made 'open line' refuelling impossible. We could not have gone to many of the small islands we did go to without the capability to overwing refuel. BGE (before Ground Eng) I have often helped the Air Eng to refuel over wing. And to operate the pump for the FSII additive.
The only open line refuelling after that was to fill the internal tanks on the tanker
ancientaviator62 is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 08:12
  #3214 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Not far from a lot of solar panels.
Posts: 88
I forgot to mention the routine use of a hair dryer in cold places like Kimpo, Goosey Gander, etc when the nose oleo extension was zero after a stopover.
Null Orifice is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 09:37
  #3215 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Wiltshire
Age: 67
Posts: 2,062
AA62 #3213,

Yes indeed, I started my life in the RAF at Colerne in 1971 after training as an Airframe apprentice at Halton. I was posted to White team, AES and spent my first year or so as part of a Base 3 (Major) Team. On its formation I was one of the first members of what the Station called Corrosion Control Team (CCT) know to us pond life as "tank rats". We worked a 4 day on 4 off 12 hour shift, doing nothing but polishing out the corrosion that was seemingly built in to the fuel tanks. I well remember on one occasion we removed the titanium heat shield, a protective sheet fitted to the wing, behind No3 Engine, and when we started to blend out a large patch of corrosion, the 30,000 rpm air grinder disappeared through the wing and in to the dry bay above. The over wing refuelling points were particularly useful as, when inside the tanks, it could become very warm and claustrophobic. We had a device called a Lamb Air Extractor, which was placed on the over wing refuelling point, attached to the 100 psi hangar air supply it created a suction within the tank, which then created an airflow, allowing some comfort. I was posted to Akrotiri in 73 so missed the replacement of the mainplanes, returning to HMs finest transport aircraft in 87 at Lyneham.

As an aside the ubiquitous NFF or UTRF was pretty much a non event for AGEs, any fault that could threaten the progress of a route was easily confirmed by inviting the GE to the flight deck, to witness the snag. It was also useful as the GE could power, consult technical manuals and land with a plan of action, or an Eng Rep requesting spares.

Smudge
smujsmith is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 18:51
  #3216 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Lounge Bar, 'Kebab & Calculator', Melksham
Posts: 155
You know those weekends that people can go on and pretend they were in the forces ...

United Airlines passengers 'abandoned' in Goose Bay.

Apologies for Daily Fail link.
Mal Drop is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 19:05
  #3217 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Wiltshire
Age: 67
Posts: 2,062
Mal Drop,

Never had a bad night stop at Goose. They should all consider themselves privileged in my humble opinion.

Smudge
smujsmith is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 19:30
  #3218 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: sussex
Posts: 1,601
First time I went to Goose it was wall to wall with KC135 tankers. There was a USAF side (US dollars etc) and a Canadian side (Canadian dollars etc). All seemed very odd but we did requent the PX and the Class 6. Last time I was there Herbst Hall was subsiding slowly into the ground.
I can recall midwinter barbies in the snow ! How did the summer Blackfly ever survive the winter.
ancientaviator62 is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 19:37
  #3219 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Wiltshire
Age: 67
Posts: 2,062
AA62,

Barbecues in the snow, the one I always remember was a Belize Schedule and getting stuck in Gander for 24 hours as they were having an election, and ATFOC missed the fact that everything stopped for elections. Thankfully one Fred Moffat occupied the territory at the time, and duly took us to his home to enjoy a barbecue. Giving us some shovels we were required to dig out his back yard, which was around 12 feet deep in snow, to give us a "feasting area", having done that, the festivities began. I know we left the next day, thankfully, my hammock only required minimal control inputs. ISTR that the temperature never rose above -16 degrees, but we all wore our shorts and T shirts destined for further use in Belize, it was a barbie after all.

Smudge
smujsmith is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 19:52
  #3220 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Lounge Bar, 'Kebab & Calculator', Melksham
Posts: 155
Well Smudge, it seems that my memories of the place don't match yours, but I still don't see a need for the rolling-eyes twunticon.
Mal Drop is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.