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The South China Sea's Gathering Storm

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The South China Sea's Gathering Storm

Old 24th Oct 2020, 11:56
  #701 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Asturias56 View Post
ermmm - think you'll find the technology to produce modern semiconductors has largely been developed in Taiwan............
Taiwan is the world leader in advanced chip production, using more of the European built extreme UV lithography gear than anyone else. But they use technology from all over.
It is a measure of Intel's decay that they led the multi billion dollar rescue of the sole supplier of this essential equipment, ASML, when they were near failing some years ago, but now are struggling to use that gear effectively. Sadly the US has implemented free access to the world's talents for so long that it has forgotten that such access is subject to change, even though the proliferation of 'sanctions' make it much more likely.
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Old 24th Oct 2020, 12:00
  #702 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by fitliker View Post
Just curious or coincidence that just days after more than 2500 Chinese fishing vessels chased the Japanese from their traditional fishing grounds . The Japanese are getting ready to allow Water from the Fukushima Nuclear disaster to be dumped into the Sea . Japanese Physops ? Who wants to eat poison fish ?
We definitely live in interesting times .
Still don't understand why Japan does not store this water in a few supertankers for a century, long enough to allow the radioactivity to decay. It would save them a lot of political headaches.
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Old 24th Oct 2020, 12:57
  #703 (permalink)  
 
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It's cheaper to just let it flow. I am surprised that this is internationally permitted and accepted. Even feels a bit like violating the test ban treaty. Waiting with the release after the Olympic Games at least indicates that there is some feedback expected to be feared for.
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Old 24th Oct 2020, 13:03
  #704 (permalink)  
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It's cheaper to just let it flow. I am surprised that this is internationally permitted and accepted. Even feels a bit like violating the test ban treaty. Waiting with the release after the Olympic Games at least indicates that there is some feedback expected to be feared for.
Less dangerous just to let it be diluted by seawater.

https://www.timworstall.com/2011/04/...rom-fukushima/
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Old 24th Oct 2020, 13:08
  #705 (permalink)  
 
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NOAA pacific radiation map:
https://images.app.goo.gl/qBE1Vf1EWK41r4wK7

Still why not contain it instead of spreading it?
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Old 27th Oct 2020, 15:31
  #706 (permalink)  
 
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More on Taiwan's latest arms purchase bids. Flight Global article.
Landmark Taiwan MQ-9 sale would vex Beijing

Intro:-
A reported US plan to sell the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems MQ-9 unmanned air vehicle (UAV) to Taiwan will complicate Beijing’s incessant prodding of the island’s defences.

Media reports indicate that the value of the potential Reaper sale is $400 million, part of an overall package worth $3 billion. Based on previous Foreign Military Sales (FMS) deals involving the Reaper, Taipei could end up with four examples of the medium-altitude, long-endurance (MALE) system. These could potentially be the SeaGuardian variant, which is optimised for maritime surveillance.
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Old 31st Oct 2020, 00:38
  #707 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Less Hair View Post
It's cheaper to just let it flow. I am surprised that this is internationally permitted and accepted. Even feels a bit like violating the test ban treaty. Waiting with the release after the Olympic Games at least indicates that there is some feedback expected to be feared for.
Considering the accident cleanup will cost way north of $100 billion, the addition of a few tankers won't be noticed. That said, the tritium is not the only contaminant in that water, there are still other nuclear residues as well.
Afaik, Japan does plan to reprocess the water again before dumping it, hopefully with a more effective method, to leave the tritium as the main contaminant.
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Old 6th Nov 2020, 22:25
  #708 (permalink)  
 
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Things are starting to get interesting with the Europeans starting to sniff the strategic wind.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-11-...a-sea/12856678
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Old 7th Nov 2020, 13:50
  #709 (permalink)  
 
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https://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1205991.shtml
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Old 9th Nov 2020, 23:27
  #710 (permalink)  
 
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I think there might be more to naval aviation than knowing which direction to put the throttle during a landing.
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Old 10th Nov 2020, 12:07
  #711 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Lookleft View Post
Things are starting to get interesting with the Europeans starting to sniff the strategic wind.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-11-...a-sea/12856678
What a load of hot air from a defense chief who is visibly unable to keep her existing small force functional. Even the Kaiser's navy had a more competent Far East Squadron.
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Old 10th Nov 2020, 12:48
  #712 (permalink)  
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Even the Kaiser's navy had a more competent Far East Squadron.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle...lkland_Islands



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Old 10th Nov 2020, 17:45
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In The Times
Australia strikes defence pact with Japan over China fears

Australia is to sign a defence pact with Japan as a bulwark against Beijing’s growing military power and assertiveness in the Asia-Pacific region. The pact will contain a reciprocal agreement to allow the two signatories to deploy troops in each other’s territory, as well as mutual training arrangements and is “aimed at sending a strong message” to China. Scott Morrison, the Australian prime minister, is expected to travel to Tokyo within weeks to sign the agreement with Yoshihide Suga, his Japanese counterpart, Australia’s Financial Review newspaper reported.


The pact follows a sharp deterioration of relations between Canberra and Beijing, with China barring several categories of Australian exports after Mr Morrison called in April for a full investigation into the origins of the coronavirus, and criticised Beijing’s activities in the region.

It also comes after recent calls for the creation of a Nato-type defence alliance in Asia to act as a counterbalance to China. India, the US, Australia and Japan are to conduct joint naval exercises together this month.

Beijing’s military has expanded and advanced rapidly in recent years. It is developing aircraft carrier strike groups, fortified several islets in the contested South China Sea, conducted almost continuous exercises around Taiwan on recent months and sought to crush Hong Kong’s autonomy and pro-democracy movement.

A pact between Australia and Japan would mark an extraordinary turn around for nations that were bitter Second World War enemies. Japan’s imperial forces bombed the north Australian city of Darwin more than 50 times and about 21,000 Australians were taken prisoner by Japanese forces in the Pacific who gained a reputation for brutality. About 7,500 of those captured would never return home.
Japan and Australia have increased defence co-operation in recent years, through joint exercises by ground, maritime and air forces and in military surveillance activities to prevent ship-to-ship transfers of banned goods by North Korea. Negotiations to finalise the pact are understood to have overcome concerns that Australian troops in Japan could in theory be exposed to the country’s laws, which allow capital punishment for the most serious crimes. Australia abolished the execution of offenders decades ago with the last taking place in 1967.

Britain, according to The Japan Times, has expressed its eagerness to agree a similar defence pact with Japan. The newspaper said talks may start after the Australian deal is concluded.

Figures released today suggested that China’s embargoes are taking a substantial toll on Australian exports, most notably coal, with Beijing reporting its imports of the fuel have fallen 47 per cent in October from the same month a year ago. It emerged too that two dozen Indian sailors have been stranded at a Chinese port for five months on board a ship blocked from unloading 170,000 tonnes of Australian coal. Jag Anand, an Indian registered bulk carrying vessel, left Gladstone in central Queensland on May 24 but has remained at Jingtang Port in northern China since June 13, unable to unload its cargo.

Australian companies, which send about 30 per cent of all exports annually to China, their largest overseas market, have been alarmed by reports over the past week that Beijing intends to block Australian wine, lobster, copper, sugar and timber.

Last week tonnes of live Australian lobster were stranded on the tarmac at a Chinese airport after the Chinese authorities raised fears the shipment might be contaminated.
Additionally:-
The United States expressed disappointment that Cambodia has demolished a second American-funded military facility without warning, as the kingdom turns to China to expand a naval base. The Cambodian authorities finished dismantling a maintenance facility at Ream base, built in 2017 with US money this month, after razing a tactical naval headquarters there in September. The Ream base is strategically located in the Gulf of Thailand, giving access to the South China Sea. The US said last month it fears the demolitions may be tied to plans for hosting Chinese military assets and personnel at the base.


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Old 10th Nov 2020, 22:34
  #714 (permalink)  
 
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Spee at least managed a competent fighting squadron, as the Coronel engagement proved.
He has been criticized for not going for broke at the Falklands encounter, attacking at dawn rather than trying to flee from a faster squad at the start of the day. Bad strategy, but he was a fighter leading a functioning command.
Germany today can muster nothing comparable and looks laughable when it pretends to have impact.
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Old 17th Nov 2020, 08:37
  #715 (permalink)  
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Chinese Microwave Weapon

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/c...oven-6tlwtrtzz

China turns Ladakh battleground with India into a ‘microwave oven’

China’s military used microwave weapons to force Indian troops to retreat during a months-long border standoff in the Himalayas, according to an account that has emerged in Beijing.

Its forces had turned two strategic hilltops that had been occupied by Indian soldiers ‘into a microwave oven’, forcing them to retreat and allowing the positions to be retaken without an exchange of conventional fire, according to Jin Canrong, a professor of international relations at Beijing-based Renmin University.

In a lecture he said that the People’s Liberation Army “beautifully” seized the ground without violating a no-live-shot rule governing the rules of engagement in the high-altitude standoff between the two Asian powers. Microwave weapons focus high frequency electro-magnetic pulses or beams at targets and cause irritation and pain by heating up any human tissue in its way.

“We didn’t publicise it because we solved the problem beautifully,” Mr Jin said. “They [India] didn’t publicise it, either, because they lost so miserably.”

The professor said that Chinese troops fired the weapon from the bottom of the hills and “turned the mountain tops into a microwave oven”.

“In 15 minutes, those occupying the hilltops all began to vomit,” he said. “They couldn’t stand up, so they fled. This was how we retook the ground.”.......

In his lecture, Professor Jin said that India mounted a surprise attack on August 29 when it deployed a team of Tibetan soldiers, known for their mountaineering skills, to seize two critical hilltops on the southern bank of the Pangong Tso Lake.

“At the time, the western theatre command [of the People’s Liberation Army] was under huge pressure,” the scholar said. “These two hilltops are very important but we’d lost them. The central military commission was quite furious, ‘How could you be so careless as to let India seize the hilltops?’, so it ordered the ground be taken back, but it also demanded that no single shot be fired.”

Professor Jin added it was almost impossible for the Chinese soldiers, most of whom were from the lowlands, to wage any effective combat at an altitude of 5,600 metres. “Frankly speaking . . their bodies won’t stand it.

“Then they came up with the clever idea to use microwave weapons.”.....
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Old 17th Nov 2020, 14:01
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Did they take a small, mobile nuclear reactor along to provide power?
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Old 17th Nov 2020, 14:15
  #717 (permalink)  

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I wonder if there was a little *DING!* when they ended the attack?
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Old 17th Nov 2020, 14:17
  #718 (permalink)  
 
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From now on every soldier will have to carry some metal spoon.
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Old 17th Nov 2020, 14:30
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You learn something every day , I never even knew that Tibet had any soldiers .
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Old 18th Nov 2020, 13:31
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Actually right now in November a good warming blast of microwave is probably what the Indian side would appreciate
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