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Gaining An R.A.F Pilots Brevet In WW II

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Gaining An R.A.F Pilots Brevet In WW II

Old 23rd Nov 2016, 18:00
  #9741 (permalink)  
Danny42C
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MPN11,

True - but if you recited that while dancing widdershins round a pentacle, should evoke a spirit or two.

Sounded better as "The Federated Malay States" IMHO.

(Ipse dixit)
I always enjoyed Local more than any other control position. Yellow blips on a CRT are no substitute for seeing reality, even if on occasion it causes you to hit the Crash Alarm.
My case against a posting to Area Radar in a nutshell !

Danny.

Last edited by Danny42C; 23rd Nov 2016 at 18:13. Reason: ADDN.
 
Old 23rd Nov 2016, 18:06
  #9742 (permalink)  
 
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"Royal Malaysian Airforce", says Google Translate


However, my Malay was limited and now extremely rusty! Selamat petang, Inche."
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Old 23rd Nov 2016, 19:11
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214 (Federated Malaya States) squadron
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Old 23rd Nov 2016, 20:30
  #9744 (permalink)  
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MPN-11,

Bless you (I take it that was a sneeze ?)

ian16th,

That's more like it !

Last edited by Danny42C; 23rd Nov 2016 at 20:31. Reason: Tidy up.
 
Old 24th Nov 2016, 07:12
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Surely a chap of Danny's standing would be a Tuan ?
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 08:17
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FED:-
...and then it was off to Tawau
Ah, Tawau! We know a song about that, don't we boys and girls?

They wouldn't send me to Tawau, Tawau,
They wouldn't send me to Tawau, Tawau,
Oh, I've been to Nanga Ghat,
But I didn't fancy that,
And I'd rather be in Tawau..wau!
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 08:37
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Originally Posted by ancientaviator62
Surely a chap of Danny's standing would be a Tuan ?
Apologies to Danny42C ... Tuan would of course have been more appropriate. I said I was rusty!
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 10:41
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MPN11,

I'm sure that, mixed up in all this, there is a compliment ! Thanks ! (I take it that we have something like 'Sahib' in mind - in which case can we please make it 'Burra Sahib' ?)

Danny.
 
Old 24th Nov 2016, 11:10
  #9749 (permalink)  
 
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(in Malay-speaking countries) sir; lord: a form of address used as a mark of respect
Tuan - definition of Tuan by The Free Dictionary

'Nuff said
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 11:25
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What a fantastic thread! We've been introduced to Chinese in the past and now we've moved on to Malay ... YLSNED indeed!
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 11:25
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Surely our Senior Member (Danny) must be a 'tuan besar'?
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 12:07
  #9752 (permalink)  
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'Datuk' would be my choice as an appropriate salutation.
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 12:32
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I hesitated before calling Danny 'Datuk' but would not disagree with Blacksheep.
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 15:47
  #9754 (permalink)  
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You've all got the advantage of me here - I never got further East than Burma (and don't know any Burmese for that matter), but on the assumption that you're being nice to me, thanks all round !

"besar" is phonetically not so far away from "burra" ("Great" or "Big" in Hindi) ?

This correspondence should now cease !

Danny.
 
Old 24th Nov 2016, 18:36
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Tawau and the Membedai rang a few bells.
During Confrontation, 205, the resident Changi Shackleton Sqn. was reinforced by successive detachments from the U.K. Sqns. and so I was out there in March '66 on detachment from 206 (Kinloss).
To guard against infiltration with small boats, we flew night patrols in the Malacca Straits and in Kuching Bay, at the North end of the border in Borneo, from Changi. To cover the South end of the border, we detached to Labuan. Last time we moved house I came across a faded "chit" authorising me to drive Land Rovers and J2's on R A F Labuan air field and also on the public roads. The last bit was so that we could drive to the Membedai, where we were billeted.
We flew early evening around the Eastern end of Borneo, past Sandakan, presumably to show the flag, and then patrolled in Tawau Bay, liaising with the R.N. who usually had a Ton class minesweeper down there, and with patrol boats of the Royal Malaysian Navy. At that time, R/T comms were done by the non-flying pilot.
Fast forward to about '95, when my wife and I had a holiday in the Far East, which included a visit to Turtle Island, off Sandakan. There was a hostel on the island, and after supper we waited until one of the wardens radioed in to say there was a turtle laying. The chief Warden asked if I had been there before. I explained that I had flown past the place a few times about thirty years before. Turned out his father had been a radio operator on the R.M.N. patrol boats at that time, and I could well have been talking to him.
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 20:05
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The object of the trial was to assess whether a night casevac could be carried out from the HQ clearing in the middle of primary jungle some 40 miles away. For the uninitiated this would be simple; fly on DR until overhead, look at some lights and land. However, this was to be under combat conditions so no lights to be carried and none on the ground.

The plot was to use an AAC Beaver, the one seen in the Tawau picture, who would position overhead using his army radio homer and when we were approaching he would fire off large illumination parachute flares which would, if the plan worked out, illuminate the area sufficiently for us to identify and carry out an approach and landing without landing lights; sounds easy. We also had to remember that this operation may have to be carried out by a pilot who may have less than 500 hrs total and no more than a dozen or so hours instrument flying on helicopters and possible none in the last month.

I was going to fly it and Ian was going to ride shotgun. The Beaver had flares that were designed to light up a battleground and apparently even when we were flying under them we were still virtually invisible in the night. We had our normal pair of Schemullies which we carried so as to illuminate the scene of our impending crash.

You have to remember that the clearing was about one hundred yards by fifty surrounded by 180 ft. trees. With the pad in the middle there is a 60 degree approach angle so one does not get a proper visual picture until one is virtually at the tree line and this had to be done and then the landing before the flare burned out. To return the Beaver would fire off another flare which would give us sufficient light to take off and establish a climb without hitting anything. The Beaver had four flares but it needed two for itself to illuminate its own crash site.

The Beaver launched and we took off about five minutes later. This would give him about fifteen minutes to establish his position overhead. He would be relying on his homer because there were no lights on the ground; combat conditions. It was pitch black; full cloud cover and being primary jungle not a glimmer of a light. It was straight on the instruments once settled on course. I flew the required track and distance and with two minutes to go asked for a quick flash from the Beaver’s navigation lights. They came up briefly ahead and above and we called for the flare.

POW!!!! AND LET THERE BE LIGHT.

The clearing was about half-a- mile at the 2 oclock. A descending S turn and we approached over the trees. We had just touched down and the flare went out; and so did our night vision. We could sense some activity around us so Ian held the stick whilst I taxed my memory climbing down the side. Somebody was bleating about wanting us to take the mail back so I told him to throw it in the back and climbed back up.

We were starting to make out a few things as our pupils started expanding and called for the second flare. Again the world lit up and we took off and climbed out. I had managed to point it in the right direction when the flare went out and we were on our own. This time we had avoided looking at the flare so we settled into the cruise.

I described on the posts about learning to fly helicopters that they are naturally unstable. With the Whirlwind there is no feel or even friction on the control stick so overcontrolling and disorientation comes naturally and this was one of the objects of the trial. I was coping quite comfortably because I was ex Vforce and had more instrument hours than some of the other pilots had total. Being on Tankers I was used to keeping an aeroplane precisely at a speed and height because an aircraft tanking off you needed that to engage properly. Because of this instrument flying on Whirlwinds presented no problems. Ian, however, felt that a first tourist may not be able to cope in the same way. In fact even he was not comfortable watching me fly it.

After about ten minutes the lights of Tauwau emerged from the gloom and we relaxed a bit. The washup brought a similar observation from the Beaver pilot as he didn’t particularly like flying over the jungle with one engine in the dark either. The subject was never brought up again.

Next: The Lumatan Incident

Last edited by Fareastdriver; 25th Nov 2016 at 08:01.
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 20:13
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Ewwwww ... scary trip!

Very enlightening in many ways.
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Old 24th Nov 2016, 20:42
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Reminds me of the time I was flying past Birmingham (ALA) USA - and they took the lid off a blast furnace !

Everything lit up, night vision gone, sheer terror - until they put the lid back on again. Never forgot it.

Danny.
 
Old 25th Nov 2016, 13:51
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Danny42C
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Fareastdriver (#9726),

Having a casual recap, came across your:
...Cigarettes were free! The brands were a bit of a mystery but they were the ones that Her Majesty’s Customs had relieved off entrants to the UK and they were sent out to the troops....
Spent all my final 13 years with HMC&E in VAT, but the Customs and Excise old-timers told me that all confiscated tobacco products were formally burned in the "Queen's Pipe" (whatever that was) under tight supervision, and all confiscated wines and spirits poured down the drain under even tighter (what a waste !)

Good to hear that some cigarettes went to a good home after all (but I bet a few were side-tracked into the local bazaar, just the same).

Danny.
 
Old 25th Nov 2016, 14:04
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The King's pipe in Falmouth is still there.
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