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Which US technology is in the Typhoon?

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Which US technology is in the Typhoon?

Old 18th Apr 2008, 13:55
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Question Which US technology is in the Typhoon?

Apparently there's some American technology in the Typhoon.
Without breaking any rules, can somebody please explain what?
AMRAAM and..?

http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/17042008/399...udis-risk.html
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 14:04
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It's the little switch on the top left hand corner of the ........
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 14:05
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MIDS. Which is supposed to be JTIDS, but better. The multinational consortium developing MIDS is headquartered in San Diego, I think.
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 14:13
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NATO Stock Number 1234-56789 (common to USAF/RAF FJ Aircrew): Ego, large, one for the use of.
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 14:25
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The flux capacitor.
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 14:59
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I thought the kit that the US helped develop was being left out of the export models?
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 15:09
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It obviously has to be a remote control for something to avoid any physical exertion and a flat area to put the 16 oz burger and 52 oz Coca Cola

...or it could just be the XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXL sized seat





Oh, and not to miss an opportunity. . .
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 17:13
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Continuum Transfunctioner
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 17:34
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It obviously has to be a remote control for something to avoid any physical exertion and a flat area to put the 16 oz burger and 52 oz Coca Cola
Unfortunately, too true, but I think you'll find that flat space has a dual-use capability for the British dentures' glass.......
 
Old 18th Apr 2008, 18:41
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Have George W and King Abdullah had a tiff?
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 20:54
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As per EFs own website, the CFG is US sourced....

http://www.eurofighter.com/news/article140.asp

Not sure how easy it would be to source elsewhere, but I don't believe its a particularly strategic technology.
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 22:48
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Old 18th Apr 2008, 23:12
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The Titanium Ramming Spike. It's cheaper in close quarters air to air than putting rounds in the cannon. Ah no, that may be one of the MoD's "innovations."
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Old 21st Apr 2008, 15:32
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Question

As per EFs own website, the CFG is US sourced....
What is a CFG?
Does this mean that the US can effectively veto any sale of the Typhoon?
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Old 21st Apr 2008, 16:01
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CFG

CFG = Cr4p Flying Gadget.

An innovation by BWOS, basically they charge you the earth for any old pile of tripe that never works and requires massive upgrade everytime you manage to get used to it. It's one saving grace is as a performance upgrade, you just leave it behind and get 500kgs lighter.

Where is my Gems money??
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Old 21st Apr 2008, 23:26
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Some of the GPS stuff requires US licences you only have to look at the first Austrian delivery curfuffle to see what holding back a US license can do.

I believe the navigation may still work but its degraded without the certain codes that the US hold.

Cheers
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Old 22nd Apr 2008, 07:15
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Err... the wings?

I seem to remember that Wilbur and Orville were the first to get those working.
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Old 22nd Apr 2008, 08:28
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I seem to remember that Wilbur and Orville were the first to get those working.
I don't believe they were the first to construct a working wing.

They may have been the first to use them on a powered aircraft but that too is disputed. Many believe that Richard Pearse may have pipped them to that post too.
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Old 22nd Apr 2008, 10:18
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Chard resident John Stringfellow may also have a claim ...

In 1840, John Stringfellow, a bobbin-maker, came up with the idea of passenger-carrying "aerial steam carriages”, and with William Henson, he designed a 20ft wingspan monoplane to be powered by one of his own steam engines. It was built, but it never flew.
After Henson emigrated to America, Stringfellow designed and built a smaller monoplane with a 10ft wingspan and a wooden frame covered in silk.
It was powered by a tiny steam engine housed in the gondola below the wings.
In June, 1848, just months after Henson emigrated, Stringfellow successfully flew his model inside a long room in a disused lace mill in Chard.
The model was launched from a supporting inclined wire several yards long, which ensured that the machine started flying at a reasonable speed and in the right direction.
Stringfellow, who died in 1883, also demonstrated a steam-powered triplane at an exhibition arranged by the Aeronautical Society of Great Britain at the Crystal Palace, London, in 1868
Stringfellow's achievement was recreated in the 1980s by the BBC for one of Adam Hart-Davis' Local Heroes' programmes when a replica of the aircraft, powered by a small modern petrol engine was successfully flown in a lace mill in Chard.

Sorry, fred drift

Last edited by Cpt_Pugwash; 22nd Apr 2008 at 10:32.
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Old 22nd Apr 2008, 10:19
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CFG, Constant Frequency Generator?
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