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Delta Flight #2423 returned to LAX - medical emergency -10-year-old

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Delta Flight #2423 returned to LAX - medical emergency -10-year-old

Old 27th Dec 2019, 18:56
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Delta Flight #2423 returned to LAX - medical emergency -10-year-old

A medical emergency resulted in a young girl being declared dead when her flight landed at Los Angeles International Airport Thursday night, authorities said.Delta Flight #2423 on its way to Seattle returned to LAX due to a passenger medical issue on board, according to FAA spokesman Ian Gregor.The passenger was identified as 10-year-old Janice Xu.

It was reported that the girl suffered a cardiac arrest on the plane. Very uncommon to have cardiac arrest at this age. Sometimes, anaphylaxis can present and cause this cardiac event.

Does anyone know if Delta is peanut free?
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 19:17
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Originally Posted by letsjet View Post
Does anyone know if Delta is peanut free?
Unless something has changed very recently, it is most definitely not peanut free. Delta offers a complementary drink service (non-alcoholic), with a choice of snacks to go with it (cookies, pretzels, or peanuts last time I flew them).

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Old 27th Dec 2019, 20:17
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Very sad news but wouldn’t an allergy to something so prevalent already be known to parents?
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 20:24
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The reporting is so poor, I have no indication regarding the child's known allergies, etc...Perhaps Delta cabin crew will know more. Further, I'm not claiming she had an allergy...Only that anaphylaxis can drop BP and cause a cardiac event. So, if you simply attempt to treat the heart, you will likely not stop the deadly reaction.

But, I'm less here to inform and more here to learn. Hopefully more data will come out and perhaps someone on the flight will answer more details.
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 20:30
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Wonder if the pilot called for medical assistance from any qualified passenger, or if so, allowed them to attempt lifesaving during the approach to landing.
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 21:41
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From the Delta website:
Have your choice of Cheez-it crackers, Squirrel Brand Almonds, KIND Dark Chocolate Chunk bars or our signature Biscoff cookies.
When I flew Delta last week, all they had was cheezits and cookies.
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 21:43
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Originally Posted by Wooden_Blades View Post
Wonder if the pilot called for medical assistance from any qualified passenger, or if so, allowed them to attempt lifesaving during the approach to landing.
Having flown Delta a lot, I can be absolutely sure they (cabin crew) did.
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 22:07
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Originally Posted by Wooden_Blades View Post
Wonder if the pilot called for medical assistance from any qualified passenger, or if so, allowed them to attempt lifesaving during the approach to landing.
“Paramedics and a number of people came in and the young girl was in the back in the galley and they were doing CPR on her for a long time,” passenger Terry Fisher told KOMO News.
https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-...g-los-angeles/

w1pf, Delta regularly alternates the available snacks - the only 'constant' being their Biscoff cookies (which they also have in their lounges). But I've never noticed them to avoid peanuts. In fact I remember a promotion a while back where they celebrated a very good year by 'upgrading' to 'honey roasted' peanuts.
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 23:14
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Why all of the posts about peanuts when there is no evidence to suggest this as the cause.
Cardiac arrest can have many causes and peanuts are waaaaaayyyy down the list.
Where are the FACTS ?
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 23:18
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In fairness, I brought it up. But, I also cautioned against focusing on it. I'm looking for the facts....Perhaps family will provide a medical history.
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 23:19
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Originally Posted by The Ancient Geek View Post
Why all of the posts about peanuts when there is no evidence to suggest this as the cause.
Cardiac arrest can have many causes and peanuts are waaaaaayyyy down the list.
Where are the FACTS ?
That's the "rumours" part of "Rumours & News"
News reports have said an autopsy is planned, so presumably it'll be known what happened at some point.
Just heard on the radio that the girl was from Vancouver, Canada - lousy way to end a Christmas vacation trip.
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 23:22
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Why such a macabre interest in the sad death of a young girl? What’s it got to do with aviation (apart from the obvious of course)?
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 23:23
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Originally Posted by tdracer View Post
Unless something has changed very recently, it is most definitely not peanut free. Delta offers a complementary drink service (non-alcoholic), with a choice of snacks to go with it (cookies, pretzels, or peanuts last time I flew them).
When was the last time you flew them ?

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Old 27th Dec 2019, 23:27
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Originally Posted by tdracer View Post
But I've never noticed them to avoid peanuts. In fact I remember a promotion a while back where they celebrated a very good year by 'upgrading' to 'honey roasted' peanuts.
When was "...a while back..." ?

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Old 27th Dec 2019, 23:46
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Originally Posted by Bull at a Gate View Post
Why such a macabre interest in the sad death of a young girl? What’s it got to do with aviation (apart from the obvious of course)?
While I understand dying is a fact of life, I wanted to learn more and get an understanding as to if this was avoidable. Perhaps, if you read through the thread, you caught my interest as to if she has/ had an underlying issue that might help explain why someone so young would die of a heart ailment. I just thought others might have the same concerns or actually provide some information. This is, after all, an aviation community. Since early reports reference a cardiac arrest, I thought all aircraft now have an AED. So, I think there is still a fair amount to learn about this tragic event....Perhaps to avoid another....
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Old 27th Dec 2019, 23:53
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Originally Posted by bafanguy View Post
When was the last time you flew them ?
October...

Memory is more fuzzy about about the honey roasted peanut promotion - what I think I recall is that I saw a banner promoting it at the Minneapolis airport, but I fly through there regular so it could have been anytime in the last couple years (I have relatives that currently live there that we sometimes visit).
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Old 28th Dec 2019, 01:42
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I am appalled at the attitude of some people with their disregard for the wellbeing of children. I can not imagine what goes on in the mind of an airline executive that allows peanuts on their aircraft. And then proudly promotes them.

I can not understand what was going on in the mind of a friend's daughter, a daughter that had flown thousands of miles to look after her sick mother, but a young lady that got highly motivated in her annoyance about being deprived of this traditional airline freebie. I thought about the family that could never go on a foreign holiday because someone might want to stuff peanuts in their face. The dichotomy. So much good, yet a bewildering callousness.

I had a first officer that had such an allergy on his licence. When he told me what the reaction was like, I found it hard to imagine how that simple nut could do that.
About two years later I was to find out just what it was like. Out of the blue. Clacton hospital for a back-stretch, a quick pee and wash hands, then drive home. It was the washing of hands that got me - one of those tippy metal bottles with strong liquid soap. 7 minutes, hands itching like hell. 13 minutes hands fat and red and feeling ill. About three minutes later I was on our Holland (on Sea) marshes and so ill I was having difficulty dialling 999. My lips were purple and face ashen. I had an elephant sitting on my chest. It is impossible to describe how ill I felt. No one place or organ or thing, just ill. I was totally disabled.

Over the next year or so, four doctors quickly jumped to the diagnosis of anaphylaxis. A few years later a young lady in Addenbrooks said it couldn't have been. I would've been dead. Ho hum. It was quite a few years later that I was cleaning the bath with Mr Muscle. I had that feeling. The paramedic was wonderful. 'Stay with me! I'm six minutes away. I opened the front door with perfect clarity of thought but dimming eyesight. On the floor I thought, 'this is not so bad, just let it happen' (I despise old age). I'd grey'd out to the point of blindness and that scared me. I wanted to see. Next thing I'm hooked up to the bloke's machine. 80/40. 40 pulse and temperature dropping. Not bad given my BP is very low anyway.

One thing came of this. The print-outs showed I was not fussing over nowt but still my doctor decried the hand contact idea. 'A nerve agent, perhaps. Not soap.' And so it goes on. Not being able to barely look at a broad spectrum of chemicals, life is one violent oscillation between being 'really good for your age' and feeling like I'm auto-composting.

So, now I've said what it's like if you don't die, back to the subject. One young teenager not that long ago. The passengers had been asked not to open the peanuts. A man four rows ahead thought bollocks to that, and killed the child. He was with his family. It's real. There is not the slightest doubt about these reactions, just sometimes how many things can get you. It gets worse. You don't brave it out and become immune. It's your immune system that's killing you.

Perhaps peanut packet label could contain: Open this and you could kill a child.

I just can't put forward any more argument in a world where such suffering and ensuing grief can be inflicted for a moment's self gratification.
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Old 28th Dec 2019, 02:12
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Do airlines carry Epipens in their medical kit?
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Old 28th Dec 2019, 02:14
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Loose Rivets, before you get too excited about 'killing children', you may want to consider a few things:
If a child has a known allergy to peanuts, there are well established steps the parent/guardians can take to mitigate the risks. First and foremost is to keep an Epi Pen handy - especially when traveling and inadvertent contact is possible. If the peanut allergy is not known, then deadly exposure on an aircraft is simply bad luck - it could literally happen anywhere food is served. Should we simply ban peanuts?
Oh, and before everyone gets completely off the rails on the entire peanut thing, news reports now say the aircraft turned around shortly after takeoff, near Santa Barbara, and landed less than an hour after takeoff. LA-Seattle is over two hours flight time - it's unlikely cabin service had even started when the unfortunate child was stricken.
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Old 28th Dec 2019, 02:17
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While perhaps a little premature, the OP's quest for better understanding seems reasonable.

To share an EMS perspective, the large majority of pediatric cardiac arrests are caused by respiratory failure. That would be consistent with a systemic anaphylactic reaction causing airway compromise. Epi-pens may buy some time but if the airway occludes fully - which happens quickly with kiddos - the last hope is an intubation kit, and a passenger competent in its use. AEDs have made a huge impact on public health but won't help if oxygen can't get into the blood that the heart's trying to circulate. Alas, it simply wouldn't be practical for airplanes to carry the equipment and skillset for every foreseeable health emergency.

None of the above is based on any information specific to this case - a profound tragedy at any time, but especially this time of year.
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