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-   -   British Pubs - why so important? (https://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/640179-british-pubs-why-so-important.html)

Cornish Jack 30th Apr 2021 10:29

British Pubs - why so important?
 
At various stages throughout the pandemic, it was almost a 'given' that mention would be made of the ability/inability to 'go to the pub'. Indeed, It constantly features on the assessment scale of where we have got to in the recovery phase. It seems to be ahead of cinemas, restaurants, theatres, churches, etc., in public (or political) importance. Apart from the 'Aussie Immigrant's' support (financial or otherwise), why this emphasis? In local terms, 3 of the 4. which were operating when we moved to our present village, closed prior to the lockdown, so is their importance exaggerated?

flash8 30th Apr 2021 10:58


Originally Posted by Cornish Jack (Post 11036401)
At various stages throughout the pandemic, it was almost a 'given' that mention would be made of the ability/inability to 'go to the pub'. Indeed, It constantly features on the assessment scale of where we have got to in the recovery phase. It seems to be ahead of cinemas, restaurants, theatres, churches, etc., in public (or political) importance. Apart from the 'Aussie Immigrant's' support (financial or otherwise), why this emphasis? In local terms, 3 of the 4. which were operating when we moved to our present village, closed prior to the lockdown, so is their importance exaggerated?

The British obsession of getting pissed. Lived in quite a few places and invariably if there is trouble in the bars it comes from drunk Brits, Irish, Aussies, Kiwis or South Africans, all five have sterling reputations in the trouble department. Many cannot live without bars, unlike their indigenous counterparts.

Hokulea 30th Apr 2021 11:00

I left the UK back in 1996 but there are still several things I miss. At the top of the list is the local pub. There are other things I miss, of course, but a nice pint or two with good company is on my to-do list every time I get to visit the UK. I'm sure there are others who don't get this but suspect many more do. I have no idea what you are referring to with "Aussie Immigrants". But I cannot imagine the UK without pubs.

Mr Mac 30th Apr 2021 11:08

CJ
I used to live in a village with a wonderful 14th Century pub which was great , and we did use it a lot , but when we moved out of the village we stopped using it, and indeed others due to drink driving laws.

However in Munich where I live in the old inner city I regularly go for a beer post work with my colleagues / staff. No driving involved as good public transport and I just walk home. To do the same in Yorkshire would involve a 3.5 mile walk each way and a climb / descent of 800ft and we do not have any form of public transport and it would not be so much fun in typical Pennine weather.

I think pubs have been in decline for sometime in the UK and some to be frank do not look very inviting although that can also be said of some bars in Europe as well but they seem to currently survive better than the British pub is doing from observations on my travels.

Cheers
Mr Mac

jolihokistix 30th Apr 2021 11:10

Very difficult to find a comfortable, quiet, untouched pub with warm atmosphere nowadays.

Dannyboy39 30th Apr 2021 11:15

It’s the bastion of flag shaggers everywhere...

ORAC 30th Apr 2021 11:24

When I was in the RAF they were as essential to navigation as GPS is today.

”Drive down xx till you reach the Crown then turn left until you pass the Pig & Whistle” were the normal type of directions used amongst pilots and other others.....

ATNotts 30th Apr 2021 12:07

Mr Mac,

As you will know, the big difference between a German Gasthof, Lokal or Kneipe is that many are family owned through generations whereas in UK even most village and community pubs are corporate and all about the corporate profit and return on investment. I detest the chain pubs with the homogenised decor and rubbish van delivered food.

Add to that the British attitude to / relationship with alcohol I rarely frequent pubs these days.

Ninthace 30th Apr 2021 12:17


Originally Posted by ORAC (Post 11036434)
When I was in the RAF they were as essential to navigation as GPS is today.

”Drive down xx till you reach the Crown then turn left until you pass the Pig & Whistle” were the normal type of directions used amongst pilots and other others.....

Funnily enough on my first cross country in a glider was Halton, Hendon, Bicester. When asked, I gave my position as "2500ft over the Dog and Badger" near Ampthill. Pubs were good landmarks.

Grayfly 30th Apr 2021 12:51

A local, to me, family owned rather grandiose private hotel was taken over a few years back by a chain type pub and was revamped into the pub from hell. It now has bouncers on the doors at the weekend and the interior has large screen tv's and slot machines. It is always busy. I just dont get why anyone would like this environment while they eat and drink. The local economy is only improved by drunks needing taxis to get home.

Chesty Morgan 30th Apr 2021 13:02

Why so important?
 
They generally keep the unemployed oiks of the community off the streets for most of the day.

stevef 30th Apr 2021 14:31

My attitude to pubs has changed since the lockdown/s began. I can drink 4 pint-cans of lager from the Co-Op at home for £5.15 twenty second's walk away instead of paying £2.80 a pint at my ex-local. I can choose my own entertainment instead of both bars having Sky Sports blaring on giant screens showing the same game or race and there was even a temporary TV on the patio so that the smokers wouldn't miss anything. Even the usual crowd I hung around with weren't interested in normal conversation whenever a match was on and trying to get served through the noisy crowd standing at the bar was scraping more icing off the cake. I guess I'm showing my age here. :}
I much prefer the relaxed Continental pavement bar systems but unfortunately they don't mix with British weather.



SpringHeeledJack 30th Apr 2021 14:48

Perhaps seen as quintessentially British ? A bell-weather of the economy, in the sense of average joe's spending habits ? Like others, the pubs were always a mixed bag for me, too many nights ended up in violent situations either in, or outside due to drunken rage by the usual subjects and it was always an underlying stress to not get caught up in the fracas. When I started travelling, like others, it was just such a relief to be able to enjoy a night out including alcohol and jollity. It's really just the drinking culture of the UK/Ireland that is so deeply embedded that cause the necking of as much as quickly as possible for a great many. There are still lovely cosy pubs existing and those are to be praised. As mentioned, due to drink-driving laws having been tightened over the years, rural pubs have been dying out for some time. Add in the price of food and drink at pubs nowadays and a simple meal for two plus drinks could run you £100 or more (at least in London).

Captivep 30th Apr 2021 14:49

In our village we have two thriving pubs, one more a drinkers' pub and the other a bit more foodie. Last year they were the hub of the village's efforts to support vulnerable local people throughout the pandemic. I accept that not all pubs/villages are like that but, at their best, a British pub really can feel like the living room of the village.

ThorMos 30th Apr 2021 14:51

i don't understand the question...

Saintsman 30th Apr 2021 15:18

I've not seen £2.80 per pint for some years.

Last weekend we were out for a country walk and stoped in a pub for a drink (outside). £5.50 for a pint and to top it off there was a service charge as the beers were brought to us...

Not surprising that the Co-op is attractive.

wowzz 30th Apr 2021 15:56


Originally Posted by Saintsman (Post 11036511)
I've not seen £2.80 per pint for some years.

Last weekend we were out for a country walk and stoped in a pub for a drink (outside). £5.50 for a pint and to top it off there was a service charge as the beers were brought to us...

Not surprising that the Co-op is attractive.

You've obviously not been to Wetherspoons - don't pay more than £2 a pint around here !

hiflymk3 30th Apr 2021 16:17

Run down boozers and supermarket prices have killed pubs. Here in Hastings a number of closed pubs have been refurbished by private owners/backers and serve local produce food and speciality beers. Pre pandemic they were doing well, I recently did some work for a similar pub and they are fully booked for the next weeks for meals in the garden.

Effluent Man 30th Apr 2021 17:46


Originally Posted by wowzz (Post 11036519)
You've obviously not been to Wetherspoons - don't pay more than £2 a pint around here !

judging by their clientele I would want paying to drink there. Old fellas with yellow beards drinking at 10am.

stevef 30th Apr 2021 17:50

I've got no sympathy for some landlords or chains when they're charging £5.60 a pint or three quid for soft drinks in London. If pubs in Cornwall can sell beer at £3.00 a pint (consider the transportation costs) compared to a fiver or so in central big cities, what's their excuse? That applies to petrol and diesel too. If they're going to wail about 'overheads', common sense says that pubs with cheap beer are going to attract more clientele, ergo more money through the till. The pandemic has obviously affected many tourist-located pubs but it's also put a lot of people out of work so they can't afford to spend their money on nights-out. I know, I was one of them.
And slightly drifting from the main topic - and my ex-local was guilty - how about filling the pint glass up instead of giving it a half-inch head? It doesn't take many of those short measures to boost their profits. And as for the 'house' red or white wine prices...


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