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rifruffian 12th Oct 2020 20:05

Dental implants: good result? bad result?...any stories.....
 
Trying to decide the best way to fill a significant gap in my gum-line; implant might be a solution but it appears to be quite a lengthy procedure. ( I am around 80yo). Any good stories, any bad stories ?

occasional 12th Oct 2020 20:25

My one implant was almost intolerable as a result of a supposedly unknown phenomenon - an allergy of my gums to the implant. This was eventually alleviated by rinsing the implant in vinegar which reduced the pain to a bearable level.
I have never been able to persuade the manufacturer to investigate the problem thoroughly, but be careful - removing an implant is not straightforward..

Mostly Harmless 12th Oct 2020 20:50

I have had one for over a decade. It has been the best possible choice for me.

It was very odd having the post installed as your skull vibrates while they drill a screw into your jaw bone. After that, it is fine. Just make sure that the person doing the procedure knows what they are doing and has some experience in the procedure. Then they put a permanent tooth on the post and you have are good to go.

Now, depending on how long you have had this empty space in your teeth, you may want to consider getting braces first to put all the teeth back where they belong (they move to fill in the gap) because once you put that post in, there's not moving it. You don't have to do this but you may want to if you are worried about the full smile.

wowzz 12th Oct 2020 22:54


Originally Posted by Mostly Harmless (Post 10903295)
I have had one for over a decade. It has been the best possible choice for me.

It was very odd having the post installed as your skull vibrates while they drill a screw into your jaw bone. After that, it is fine. Just make sure that the person doing the procedure knows what they are doing and has some experience in the procedure. Then they put a permanent tooth on the post and you have are good to go.

Now, depending on how long you have had this empty space in your teeth, you may want to consider getting braces first to put all the teeth back where they belong (they move to fill in the gap) because once you put that post in, there's not moving it. You don't have to do this but you may want to if you are worried about the full smile.

Without being rude, the OP is 80 years. Not really sure if braces are really of use at that time of life, as I presume they would need to be in place for a couple of years prior to the implant.

VP959 12th Oct 2020 23:11

My mother in law had several fitted in her lower jaw, at the front, when she was in her mid-70's. She had a fair bit of pain and discomfort when the pegs were put in (the dentist did them all at once, four in a row I think), and there needed to be a lengthy break between those being fitted and then the permanent teeth being fitted, to allow the gums to heal and settle to something close to the final shape, I think. In the ~10 years since she's had no trouble with them at all, and reckons there were far and away the best solution for her missing front teeth.

I think the only concern I'd have would be for that initial period, when you have to live with some discomfort and the rather odd appearance of the (I think titanium) pegs poking out of your gums. Provided you're OK with that, then based on the big improvement they gave to my mother in law's teeth, I'd say go for it.

visibility3miles 12th Oct 2020 23:14

Check how brittle your bones are first.

See if you have osteoporosis or anything that will increase the risk of fracture before they drill into your jaw.

I have no expertise in this area.

jolihokistix 12th Oct 2020 23:45

About 25-30 years ago I had two inserted lower left. Solid as a rock. Since then their opposite numbers upstairs found the rock too solid and inflexible, and they gave up the ghost. So I needed a denture to bite against them.
The implants themselves need extra careful brushing, especially around the gum line, I was later told.

chevvron 13th Oct 2020 03:52

Expensive in the UK but we went to Poland (Szczecin) for the wife (who has osteoporosis) to be fitted with one covering 3 teeth.
Cost (incl air fares and hotel for 3 or 4 days) was about one third of what we were quoted in the UK.


Alsacienne 13th Oct 2020 06:56

I had one over 4 years ago. I think what surprised me most was the length of time from decision to leaving the dentist's surgery for the last time. Almost as long as a pregnancy! As I had to have all the old tooth removed (including roots) to provide space in which the implant could be fitted, it was the healing time especially where the roots met the jaw bone. The actual implant was done with two visits to a specialist dental surgeon in the locality, was completely painless (shocking as I was expecting 'the worst') and cosmetically unremarkable (OK so it wasn't a front tooth). I have never had any problems whatsoever afterwards, have a pretty little certificate to show (useful if body-scanned at an airport?) and know that it will outlive the rest of my teeth! It is expensive, but professionally done, lasts a lifetime and should be considered an investment (in oneself and one's well-being!).

double_barrel 13th Oct 2020 07:07

I smashed my front teeth in a climbing accident in my teens. For the rest of my life I was plagued with problems of horrible crowns, repeated infections, constant replacements etc. In the end I went with proper implants and have had no serious trouble since.


A couple of caveat's:
It was expensive, uncomfortable and time consuming to have done and I would say the benefits are realized slowly over the next 10 years.
As I have aged and my gums retreated, the margins are becoming visible.

'Chuffer' Dandridge 13th Oct 2020 09:55

Iíve had had 3 implanted front teeth since 1983. My dentist comments on them every time saying how good they are. No reason to think they wonít last till Iím gone.

Filler Dent 13th Oct 2020 11:06

I lost two upper front teeth whilst fielding at short leg in a cricket match. My dentist recommended implants as the best solution and referred me to a specialist.
Got to say they have been fantastic and much better than a crown I have on the other side of my mouth.

Mr Optimistic 13th Oct 2020 11:18

Think it depends on condition of bone and gums. A bone graft is sometimes necessary.

esa-aardvark 13th Oct 2020 11:25

I had a number of implants done in Spain.
A while ago, but it didn't take that long. Firstly the titanium
fittings into the jaw. Then temporary plastic thingy complete
with teeth screwed onto the titanium parts. The cast for this was done
immediately after the inserts went in, and the thing itself came back later the
same day. As I recall I went off for a very careful lunch break.
then 6 weeks or so for healing and then fitting of the final teeth.
15 years later all teeth are still there. Look out for the screws becoming
loose, happened to me, but simple to rectify. If you are travelling get
a tool kit from your dentist, different countries use different makers.

Tartiflette Fan 13th Oct 2020 11:28


Originally Posted by VP959 (Post 10903368)
I think the only concern I'd have would be for that initial period, when you have to live with some discomfort and the rather odd appearance of the (I think titanium) pegs poking out of your gums. Provided you're OK with that, then based on the big improvement they gave to my mother in law's teeth, I'd say go for it.

This doesn't happen - or at least not with me. A socket is implanted in the jaw and after the "settling-in period" of a couple of months ( actually the bone growing around the socket ) a titanium-pin is screwed in, then a crown is fitted.

I have had one implant for 10 years and was surprised by two things: the time taken by the whole procedure i.e. initial consultation, socket fitting, wait for "bedding-in", check that socket is correctly bedded-in, pin-fitting took about six months and then two further x-rays at six-monthly intervals. This makes me wonder about the procedures done in Turkey/E Europe. Do they omit all the after-care ?

When I was initially quoted Ä 1 000 ( France ), I didn't realise that this didn't include all the x-rays and - especially - the cost of the crown. The final cost was close to E 2 000 - no social security available for anybody with this as deemed cosmetic. My normal dentist fitted the crown as the implant guy only did implants. He had done nothing but that for 15 years and mentioned that the cost had remained the same from the beginning i.e. very high back when he started.

Everything went very smoothly, absolutely no pain with the treatment and have no sense at all that this isn't a natural tooth ( molar ). 100% recommendation.

P.S. The pins are all individually numbered, so you will always be identifiable if the worst happens.

Repos 13th Oct 2020 12:40

Shop around
 
A friend in his 70's needed about 4 - 6 to replace an old failed bridge at the front.
He got quotes from a couple of places in the UK and here who had glossy adverts on the internet.
They wanted to remove all his teeth, put in 4/6 posts and mount 15 teeth on them in a single arch. Cost 15 - 20,000
He finally got a proper dentist here who said there was no need to remove the others as they were fine.
I think the final bill was about 6000 but he's quite happy with the result

Ancient Observer 13th Oct 2020 16:55

Expensive.
(I got competitive quotes. My own dentist came in cheapest.)

Takes time.

In my case, a brilliant outcome.

RatherBeFlying 13th Oct 2020 17:46

Don't get a bridge
 
Do shop around. One of the teeth supporting my bridge had to come out; so had a double implant with bone added in the big city - $20,000. A few years later after moving to a smaller town, had to have another implant done at a very well run implant factory for under $4,000. I would have been some $8,000 better off had my bridge held up another year.

These days implants work much better than bridges which have to be replaced every ten years or so. At age 80, your first bridge might outlast you, depending on overall health.

For those considering going abroad, it's best to plan for 2-3 weeks away so any early problems can be looked after by the dentist who installed the implant(s).

Implants can fail. Flossing around the implant is important as is a night mouthguard and not smoking.

Mostly Harmless 13th Oct 2020 17:51


Originally Posted by wowzz (Post 10903360)
Without being rude, the OP is 80 years. Not really sure if braces are really of use at that time of life, as I presume they would need to be in place for a couple of years prior to the implant.

I am aware. The person asked for information so I gave all I had rather than make decisions for them. As you say, the Op is 80 and considering an implant, perhaps there are other considerations the Op has in mind as well. One would not want to spend a large sum of money On a permanent change and be unhappy with the results if one is unable to change the results.

AyrTC 13th Oct 2020 18:13

I had implants and after a year it was found that my body ( jawbone ) rejected them. There is now a new procedure which the dentist wants me to try. Itís funny that my dental practice is not doing routine NHS appointments, but private implants walk this way sir ££££££!


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