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-   -   War in Australia (any Oz Politics): the Original (https://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/477678-war-australia-any-oz-politics-original.html)

Clare Prop 3rd Apr 2013 09:15

Ex pollies in the Slammer
 
Brain Bourke?
Pauline Hanson?
I'm sure there must be more from the WA Inc days.....

Worrals in the wilds 3rd Apr 2013 09:28

A fair swag of Queensland's former state cabinet at one stage.
Leisha Harvey, Don Lane, Brian Austin and Geoff Muntz; all for misappropriating public funds. Conservatives all, but that would never happen, would it? :E:} Hinzey probably only escaped by being dead and Joh by being Joh.

In fairness, Merri Rose and Gordon Nuttal from the ALP for extortion and corruption respectively, not to mention the two child molesters... http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/sr...lies/worry.gif

The federal ratio is 2:1 (literally 2 to 1) National to ALP according to this article... quite a good read by wiki standards. :8
List of Australian politicians convicted of crimes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

CoodaShooda 3rd Apr 2013 12:58

No mention of the NT, Worrals.

Peter Adamson was a retired conservative MP, gaoled for misappropriation as Lord Mayor of Darwin.

Bob Collins, the former Hawke labor minister, topped himself the day before facing trial for paedophilia. As he wasn't convicted, he missed out on the list.

RJM 3rd Apr 2013 15:47

Food for thought. Just listening to Piers Akerman of the Daily Telegraph on the radio. He is warning of a MUA/CFMEU takeover of the ALP, and potentially, by proxy, the management of Aust under any future Labor government, should the takeover succeed.

The unions control massive super funds, and they have no Companies Act and ACCC to control their doings.

Akerman goes on to say that unions no longer act in the interests of their members, they act in the interests of the tiny group who control unions.

Extrapolating Akerman's view, it may be that future elections could be characterised as the population at large versus a few hudred union executives.

Proof of this tendency is the fact that the PM is now unwanted not only by the Libs and the majority of Australians - 70% in all, but she is still there, held in place as a stalking horse by the radical Left, ie the MUA and their buddies. What's more, the ALP may be splitting, if Crean's opposition to Gillard has any real weight.

That is not how it is supposed to work. Our only chance to stop this development is a Liberal victory at the next election. Given the power wielded by the radical Left unions and the propaganda and (borrowed) cash giveaways they can unleash through their puppet government, the battle may be closer than people think, despite the current polls.

sisemen 3rd Apr 2013 15:59

Already open slather in the WA press

MUA push to take over WA Labor - The West Australian


The militant Maritime Union of Australia has embarked on an aggressive recruitment drive to massively increase its influence on internal Labor politics and the WA and Federal parliaments.

Under the leadership of the combative Christy Cain, it is engineering what it believes will be a "grassroots" takeover of the WA branch of the Labor Party.

In the past 12 months, the number of MUA members who are also Labor members has increased more than fivefold to 850, up from 150 a year ago.

This means one in four of the 3500 members of the ALP is now aligned to the MUA.

Worrals in the wilds 3rd Apr 2013 23:20


This means one in four of the 3500 members of the ALP is now aligned to the MUA.
Only 3500 members? There's the problem. The ALP have now shed so many mainstream members that the radicals are going to get far more say. Doesn't mean that normal people will vote for them of course; more the opposite if the current mob are anything to go by.

Mr Cain said the building union CFMEU and other "like-minded" unions would help the MUA in stopping the left-wing United Voice - the "Missos" - and the right-wing SDA - the "Shoppies" - "pulling all the strings".

This sounds like a factional punch up as much as anything. TBQH I agree with Cain in that the ALP have drifted away from ALP policy, particularly under Rudd.

The ALP has long been controlled by unions; what's new? People who don't like that (such as most of you guys/gals) don't usually vote for them. The Libs are controlled by big business, mining and finance types
and the Nats by the farmers' federations; I don't like them and they rarely act in my interests (any more than the unions act in yours), so I don't usually vote for them. Surely that's politics.

Clare Prop 4th Apr 2013 02:10

I hope that history can repeat itself....1979 vote of no confidence in the government of James Callaghan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I remember that night so well as I remember the Winter of Discontent. What came after, Thatcher, wasn't "nice" and went far too far the other way, laying the foundations for the "Greed is Good" mindset that has contributed to Europe's woes as much as rampant socialism has... but was arguably necessary to prevent the UK from becoming another Soviet republic with all the connections between some union officials and the KGB.

The rats who left the sinking ship came here and that is why you hear so many UK accents in the upper echelons of the unions. Give them too much power and they soon betray themselves.

I pray it will all be over soon, this deja vu isn't a good feeling.

sisemen 4th Apr 2013 03:06

I wasn't quite as interested in politics then as I am now so can't remember the exact details of the vote but what I do remember, and quite vividly, is the total breakdown of UK society in the lead up to it.

I was privvy to seeing UK Intelligence Digests and there were some pretty interesting things being said about some of the union people and their links to others whose interests in the UK were not exactly friendly. Remember "Red" Robbo at British Leyland? Along with crap management and poor design he formed the third component (union bastardry) that brought that company down and caused how many redundancies? And, as you say Clare most of the scumbag traitorous union hacks came over here to continue their disruptive practices - any many of them are now in parliament.

I too, see many parallels in what is happening here now. We simply cannot continue to limp along until September. How much further damage is Dullard and Swanee going to inflict on the country until they're given their marching orders?

With a bit of luck maybe even my April Fool's prank might come to reality :E

Ovation 4th Apr 2013 04:32


The ALP has long been controlled by unions; what's new? People who don't like that (such as most of you guys/gals) don't usually vote for them. The Libs are controlled by big business, mining and finance types and the Nats by the farmers' federations; I don't like them and they rarely act in my interests (any more than the unions act in yours), so I don't usually vote for them. Surely that's politics.
There's a not too subtle difference between the two.

Hitch you wagon to the ALP/Unions and it will all end up in tears sooner or later (sooner if Swan et al are playing with the purse strings), whereas with the Libs they might want to look after themselves, but they generally take the electorate along the prosperity path too.

CoodaShooda 4th Apr 2013 05:00

Roy Morgan has now put it at 59/41 2pp.

So, no bounce from beating Rudd. :E

Andu 4th Apr 2013 06:34

Today, the gummit has announced that two more boats with 105 on board have arrived.

That would seem to be maintaining the twice daily scheduled service.

How many more need to arrive before it becomes an invasion? By then, will we be speaking English?

RJM 4th Apr 2013 06:34


The ALP has long been controlled by unions; what's new? People who don't like that (such as most of you guys/gals) don't usually vote for them. The Libs are controlled by big business, mining and finance types and the Nats by the farmers' federations; I don't like them and they rarely act in my interests (any more than the unions act in yours), so I don't usually vote for them. Surely that's politics.
Ovation, it has to be said that the influence on the ALP by unions is much more direct than the influence of big business on the Libs.

Most ALP MPs owe fealty to a union, usually the one that nurtured them and whose turn it was to have their man or woman preselected.

Lib MPs tend to come from wider backgrounds with fewer career politicians. How can you say that a housewife or a small business operator owes an alleigance to, for example, the big mining coporations?

Worrals in the wilds 4th Apr 2013 08:11


Lib MPs tend to come from wider backgrounds with fewer career politicians.
Agree 100%, and I think that's one of the ALP's biggest problems. I think that the rise of 'career' unionists who join the cause straight out of uni is their second biggest problem. There's a place for experts (particularly wrt IR law) but people with real life work experience are also important, particularly at the top of the food chain.

How can you say that a housewife or a small business operator owes an alleigance to, for example, the big mining coporations?
Once they become an MP they do. They may also carry allegiences to their small business association, as seen in the rather tawdry Scott Driscoll affair in Queensland at the moment.
State LNP MP for Redcliffe Scott Driscoll dictated final words to be used on community association's letter to Commonwealth | The Courier-Mail

I don't know about the federal government so much, but I do know that when the LNP won government in Queensland, about 24 hours later a bunch of LNP-friendly associations and interest groups arrived on the front steps of the Parliamentary Annexe with shopping lists.

This resulted in some hilarious statements from the government, particularly with respect to revising liquor licensing laws. They gave the Courier Mail a list of amendments they were 'discussing' that was basically a direct copy of the Qld Hotel Assocation's charter which can be (more or less ;)) summarised thus; more grog for all, 24/7 pubs with outlets in kindys, churches and government buildings but no supermarket liquor trading ever :}. Kinda obvious, but subtlety has never played a big part in Qld politics.

Party policy is where influence becomes influential, and all political parties are subject to it. While Labor's faction system is more overt than the conservative divisions (apart from the Lib/Nat divide which sometimes resembles Carnarvon Gorge :eek:) and while the unions probably do exert more influence on personal MPs in a more organized fashion, I don't believe that the Libs are immune to it by a long shot.

While they may only listen to some of What Gina Wants, a decent ALP government doesn't give the unions everything they want either. They haven't even gotten their way on everything with this mob until recently; it's only now the government is staring oblivion in the face that they're throwing everything they can at them.

Notice how quiet most of the unions are at the moment in relation to the federal government? :suspect: Of course Howes is fawning around like an Aria wine waiter and Oliver is saying what he has to as Secretary of the ACTU, but there hasn't been a lot of vocal support from the rest of them beyond some token lip service.

It's as good as given that the MUA aren't boosting ALP numbers to give the current government a big hand at the next election; IMO they and the CFMEU are looking beyond September:8. I'd put five bucks on their waterfront party recruitment spiel going something along the lines of 'so, are you happy with the current ALP? No? Whatya gonna do about it'? In my opinion, good luck to them too. Let them have a crack at it; they have to be better than this mob. :{

SOPS 4th Apr 2013 08:52

Andu,I think it is an invasion already. But, you and I seem to be the only ones concerned about it:mad: Julia and co don't seem the slightest bit concerned and SHY is almost wetting her pants in excitement :mad:

Takan Inchovit 4th Apr 2013 20:16

Wonder who will come out of the woodwork while Jools is in China?

RJM 4th Apr 2013 23:31

With Gillard, you can't win.

From Question Time:

Abbott: "Will the PM confirm that more people had arrived by boat over the past nine months than they had under the 11 years of Howard government?"

Gillard: ''I can confirm that we would have seen fewer boat arrivals but for the Leader of the Opposition's reckless negativity."

On proposed new media laws:

'The PM talked of the Coalition's ''sanctimonious nonsense about freedom of speech''...'

Question Time | Gillard Staying Put

14th September... only 163 more days of this

500N 4th Apr 2013 23:45

Re Super

I can't believe they actually did it.

Totally inept at managing the economy and then grab people's
money who were good.

Can't believe it.

Worrals in the wilds 5th Apr 2013 01:01


Gillard: ''I can confirm that we would have seen fewer boat arrivals but for the Leader of the Opposition's reckless negativity."
Wha'?:confused::confused:
Bring on the CFMEU. At least their statments make sense.

Anyone who can watch Question Time without throwing stuff at the telly deserves some sort of medal for endurance.

CoodaShooda 5th Apr 2013 01:15

The wife and I attended a Question Time last year. (OK, we were visiting Canberra and were bored.)

A party of American tourists sat next to us. By the third question, they were expressing amazement that the ministers were getting away with non-answers. From half way through, there was an almost continuous groan of "answer the question" coming from the group.

So it's not just us. :E

Clare Prop 5th Apr 2013 01:23

Believe it, 500N

The Fabians believe in the nationalisation of private wealth.

I think it's actually their 11th attack on super (?) but this has got the most publicity. I'm sure there will be many more unless we can get rid of these scum, to eventually affect every Australian..unless of course they are a politician.:mad:

I wouldn't be surprised if this was all part of Keating's plan when compulsory super, Nanny state at it's worst, was forced on us. Force another cost onto business, force people into building up a government approved nest egg, lull them into a false sense of security thinking it is "their" money...and then plunder it later on to spend on anything other than the people who earned it (including the employers!) ......:mad::mad:

Meanwhile the "fabulously wealthy" will be laughing all the way to the British Virgin Islands.

Does Swan think that people of that ilk would stash money in a crappy appallingly managed superannuation fund?

No wonder they want to raise it to 12%. Hell Wayne, why not 100%? We horrible business owners can afford it, right? :mad::mad::mad:


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