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-   -   UK politics - Hamsterwheel (https://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/411282-uk-politics-hamsterwheel.html)

G-CPTN 19th Apr 2010 15:12

I believe that the Lib-Dems would have involved us in the Euro.

Bruce Wayne 19th Apr 2010 15:23


How is the air travel crisis playing out as a political situation for Brown et al?

This sums that up...


Since one of the UK COBRA committee, a Mrs Harriett Harman, announced to a startled world that NATS is the regulator for aviation safety in the UK
:ugh:

and Brown .. Make a decision ? without a focus group....

frostbite 19th Apr 2010 15:29


I believe that the Lib-Dems would have involved us in the Euro.

I believe that's a dead cert! They are quite fanatical about the EC and are looking for closer integration.

Their largely unspoken Green agenda is something to concern us too.

Nick Riviera 19th Apr 2010 15:37

Turin said:

"So, the upshot of all this debate is the same old, above-average-income Daily Mail/Express reading little Englanders chucking insults around?"

and

"Calling people names, just because you can, adds nothing to debate."


And they say that it is Americans who don't get irony!

It's a bit like the fraudster Mandelson, who called Cameron " a member of a metropolitan elite."

You couldn't make it up.

Bruce Wayne 19th Apr 2010 15:51

Dr. Nick,

i let that slide for someone else to pick up !! :ok:

Union Jack 19th Apr 2010 19:47

Forgive me if I have failed to notice any mention of this elsewhere but, depending on how long the Volcanic Ash Saga continues, with the associated knock-on effect on the subsequent late return of British "refugees", the voting in certain marginal seats could well be crucially, and interestingly, affected.:uhoh:

Jack

Andy_S 19th Apr 2010 20:00


Originally Posted by TURIN (Post 5645762)
I still maintain, UK PLC did not cause this mess, no matter how large the banking sector.

Agreed, but mismanagement of the economy made it harder to deal with the fallout.

Bruce Wayne 19th Apr 2010 20:31

TURNIN,

from your own link..


Many UK banks had invested large sums in sub-prime backed investments and have had write off billions of pounds in losses.

But it got worse. Investors became nervous about buying any investment linked to mortgages, no matter how high their quality.

Many of the UK’s banks had been using the investment markets to fund large chunks of their mortgage business (a process known as securitisation).

As fear spread it became impossible to sell these investments leaving a black hole in many banks and building societies' finances. The result: a credit crunch as lending dried up.
irony is more than is used to press your shirty..

OFSO 19th Apr 2010 20:41

It was quite marvelous hearing Lord Mandlebum saying last night that "Britain couldn't make any unilateral decisons on her own"...because...."we are part of Europe"..... etc etc while other countries - Germany, Belgium, France and Spain - were doing exactly that.

Nice also to hear that three Royal Navy ships with a total capacity of under a thousand passengers are steaming off to help some of the 15,000 stranded British get home and that "we have ensured there are extra trains and ferries..." ("we" - oh really ?)

TURIN 19th Apr 2010 21:04

BRUCEW

It is not in dispute that some of the UK's banks did not act sensibly.

My beef is with those who seem to think that when Britain sneezes the world gets Bird Flu.

G-CPTN 19th Apr 2010 22:47


to help some of the 15,000 stranded British get home
More like 150,000 according to the Foreign Office (45,000 in Spain - including the islands).

Cross-Channel ferries handled 12,000 footpassengers over the weekend instead of the 'usual' 1,000 normally carried.

Blacksheep 20th Apr 2010 09:41

I'm an active party member, trudging the strees every evening, canvassing real voters, listed on the electoral role. This is true opinion polling with a very large sample rate - we have a formal schedule that will knock on every door and speak to everyone who answers, greeting them by name. People are surprisingly polite and cooperative. Even in the Labour stronghold part of our marginal constituency, we're only ever subjected to friendly banter. Our candidate dived into a crowd of men drinking beer at the tables outside the local pub, for a palm pressing session. " I know you - you're our MP!" said one chap, "...yeah, you're all right - but I'm still not going to vote for you."

In our wide ranging poll of 60,000+ voters in our constituency, about half of the people answer the door, and so far we've recorded about 15,000 responses. The surprising thing is that this week we're not seeing that nationally reported swing to the Liberal-Democrats. In fact, our canvassing shows similar results to that conducted in 2005 and the second week looks pretty much like last week's data. So, where are all these national poll results coming from? Registered voters greeted by name on their own doorstep or nameless passers-by on street corners? The real poll is the 100% poll to be conducted on 6 May. We shall see.

Bruce Wayne 20th Apr 2010 11:44


It is not in dispute that some of the UK's banks did not act sensibly.

My beef is with those who seem to think that when Britain sneezes the world gets Bird Flu.
Oh i agree.

What needs to be remembered is that a lot of the finance that was toxic was financed through the UK banks...


Traders received multi-million pound bonuses after acquiring more than £30 billion of sub-prime assets during early 2007. Following these purchases the bank “didn’t stand a chance” of surviving unaided, one board director told this newspaper.

The sub-prime assets are being blamed for causing the bank’s near collapse last year. Last month RBS posted a loss of £28 billion – the largest in British corporate history.

Sir Fred Goodwin, the former chief executive of RBS, is this weekend under pressure to disclose what he knew of the sub-prime trading.

He repeatedly put out statements to the City saying that RBS “don’t do sub-prime” even though traders were buying the sub-prime assets. RBS board directors suspect he may have acted negligently.

British taxpayers are being forced to underwrite the toxic loans bought undisclosed by executives working for RBS subsidiaries in America.
RBS traders hid toxic debt - Telegraph

When you live on debt and the fertilizer hits the air conditioning, the line of credit dries up and the bubble bursts.

Blair and Brown, relaxed the regulations to the banks against advice allowing the banks to throw endless credit to get hocked up on overpriced [email protected] in the US where blair was trying shove his nose up Bush's arse.

No, the UK didnt sneeze and the world got bird flu. Our esteemed leaders, allowed the banks to run amok with providing credit for [email protected]

The UK under Blair/Brown carried too much debt that couldn't be recovered when the bubble burst and left with worthless paper and debt.

The UK as a financial center with such a large proportion of its GDP based on banking and finance has caused a retraction of available funding on the international marketplace. Some industries around the globe have needed the cheap credit that was available from the UK to operate some havn't.

As such, some countries have been screwed by the lack of finance available in the international market, others havn't.

Effluent Man 20th Apr 2010 14:50

Well if Blacksheep is seeing "Very similar results to 2005" would that not suggest that the result may go that way too? My guess is that Labour are going to do rather worse,the Tories a bit better and the LD's quite a lot better than 2005.

I bet on a hung parliament early in 2009 and I could bet against it now and be assureed a decent profit,but I'm not going to.Cleggy is going to pay for my holiday this year,somebody has to.

frostbite 20th Apr 2010 15:30


Am I living in cloud cukooland?

I think you may be living in a land where everyone is compulsorily obliged to pay for the convenience of others.

Sprogget 20th Apr 2010 15:32


and say send us the bill
There's yer first problem


All of this paid for by the UK government
...and there's yer second.

Bruce Wayne 20th Apr 2010 17:15


No. 10 to look very good in a crisis...
and there's your third problem

Blacksheep 21st Apr 2010 09:17


"Very similar results to 2005" would that not suggest that the result may go that way too?
Oh, I do hope so. 2005 turned a long standing and large Labour majority into a Conservative majority and elected a proper local MP. If the national result follows Welwyn-Hatfield's lead, we'll winkle Gordon and Alistair out of Downing Street.

Bruce Wayne 21st Apr 2010 09:33


we'll winkle Gordon and Alistair out of Downing Street
Goodbye Darling


Word reaches Guido that the Darlings have emptied their Number 11 flat. All their bookshelves have been boxed up and are ready to go. They are clearly not planning on coming back to Downing Street again.
Goodbye Darling - Guy Fawkes' blog

Sprogget 21st Apr 2010 10:08


Oh, I do hope so. 2005 turned a long standing and large Labour majority into a Conservative majority and elected a proper local MP
In fact, since the creation of the constituency in 1974, the Conservatives have held Welwyn Hatfield continuously with the exceptions of the October 1974 & 1997 & 2001 elections, all of which were periods of Tory implosion, but then I expect you knew that, even if you didn't share it.:rolleyes:


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