Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

Donner Kebab - what meat is it?

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Donner Kebab - what meat is it?

Old 25th Apr 2022, 13:21
  #61 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Beyond the Blue Horizon
Age: 61
Posts: 966
Originally Posted by Less Hair View Post
When in Berlin here is a good one: Hasir. Not sure who officially claims to be the Döner inventor.
"Hasir Kreuzberg" is their original place. Standorte ? Has?r Berlin

Menu: http://www.hasir.de/pdf/kreuzberg_speisekarte.pdf
I prefer their meat skewers served restaurant style like Beyti Kebap - Yufka ekmekli.
Less Hair
The German Doner Kebab Chain can now be found in a number of places in the UK. It has quite a small menu but is a good interpretation of the original in Germany. I have had one of their Gym Box,s for lunch occasionally and found it quite satisfying.

Cheers
Mr Mac

Mr Mac is offline  
Old 25th Apr 2022, 15:18
  #62 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Glorious Devon
Posts: 686
Originally Posted by Mr Mac View Post
Less Hair
The German Doner Kebab Chain can now be found in a number of places in the UK. It has quite a small menu but is a good interpretation of the original in Germany. I have had one of their Gym Box,s for lunch occasionally and found it quite satisfying.

Cheers
Mr Mac
I presume that a Gym box is a different kind of box to the Cricket version?
Ninthace is offline  
Old 25th Apr 2022, 19:19
  #63 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Beyond the Blue Horizon
Age: 61
Posts: 966
Ninthace
Cardboard box with salad and Beef with sauce. Would not want to try as a Cricket box as would spoil the Whites and definitely no protection from the likes of Fred Trueman (sorry I am that old - “Drive out the Northern Thirst “ as I remember a Webster Pennine bitter advert from my youth time visits to UK).

Cheers
Mr Mac
Mr Mac is offline  
Old 26th Apr 2022, 09:19
  #64 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Asia
Posts: 1,376
Similar to the Glasgow salad ?






krismiler is offline  
Old 26th Apr 2022, 10:46
  #65 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Glorious Devon
Posts: 686
Good of them to pre-eat part of it for you
Ninthace is offline  
Old 26th Apr 2022, 14:47
  #66 (permalink)  
See and avoid
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 591
As a child, I used to love the chicken pot pies served at a nearby Howard Johnson’s, a now nearly non-existent restaurant chain.

I did notice over the years that the amount of chicken dropped dramatically, and the amount of gravy increased substantially.

I can still buy frozen chicken pot pies at the local supermarket, but the amount of saturated fat in each one comes close to exceeding the recommended daily dose, so I tend to give it a miss.
visibility3miles is offline  
Old 26th Apr 2022, 15:04
  #67 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: cowtown
Posts: 595
Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
Similar to the Glasgow salad ?


Washed down with some electric soup ( Lanny ya fanny or buckfast for the posh Easter house snobs ) and you can begin to understand why the male life expectancy in Glasgow is 55 years. Buckfast for breakfast
You can start a parade in the Gallowgate by rolling a bottle of Buckfast down Bellfield street .
fitliker is offline  
Old 26th Apr 2022, 18:59
  #68 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Moved a bit west...
Posts: 13
Originally Posted by oxenos View Post
My wife's grandfather was a butcher. He never ate suasages - he did know what was in them.
I worked for a family butcher in my teens. The sausages we made were from very good ingredients, but the meat was mainly offcuts which couldn't be sold as a joint. Their tomato sausages are still the best I've ever tasted; the flavour comes from their own spiced rusk recipe.

We also made black pudding, or at least the immediate family did. Secret recipe and all that! The old man used to take it to France for competitions and to this day I think they advertise its "Silver Medal Prize" standard. I wasn't so keen on dealing with partly clotted pig's blood we fetched in big stainless steel buckets, freshly bled at the abattoir.
Wan Wei Luke is offline  
Old 26th Apr 2022, 20:08
  #69 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 704
As a child, I used to love the chicken pot pies served at a nearby Howard Johnson’s, a now nearly non-existent restaurant chain.

Speaking of HoJo's, visibility3miles, I loved their fried clam platter! Too many crispy fried Ipswich clams doused in lemon juice and tartar sauce, spicy hush puppies, and cold cole slaw. My gall bladder has never quite recovered.

- Ed

Last edited by cavuman1; 26th Apr 2022 at 20:35. Reason: add descriptors
cavuman1 is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2022, 03:12
  #70 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2022
Location: Derbyshire
Age: 58
Posts: 0
It's lamb Jim, but not as you know it

Fortuitously our local kebab shop is excellent, their kebab meat is a puréed mix of lamb shoulder and spices, formed onto the spit in store, and cooked and sliced to order.

I've had some shocking kebabs in the past though, having lived all over the world.

If you cannot recognise the meat by smell, texture or taste, and your dog backs away when you offer him a piece, file the kebab in the bin and check local newspapers for stories about missing cats 🙀

​​​​​
Jeanette D is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2022, 04:36
  #71 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 400
If you cannot recognise the meat by smell, texture or taste...
Admittedly I have never been able to do this with ANY Döner Kebap I ever had. Isn't this part of the fun?

Last edited by Less Hair; 27th Apr 2022 at 05:43.
Less Hair is online now  
Old 27th Apr 2022, 08:34
  #72 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 58
Posts: 9,818
Originally Posted by Jeanette D View Post
and your dog backs away when you offer him a piece, file the kebab in the bin and check local newspapers for stories about missing cats 🙀

​​​​​
Dogs are usually the first suspect when cats go missing...

(My friend had a grisly tail, er, tale, when I saw her yesterday - it seems she was woken by a commotion outside on Sunday morning involving several dog walkers, a peckish Staffordshire bull terrier and a chihuahua which apparently was just the snack the Staffie was looking for... oh dear... PDSA is handy but probably not staffed at that time. Either way she thinks it was game over for the four legged taco...)
treadigraph is online now  
Old 27th Apr 2022, 23:25
  #73 (permalink)  
25F
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 276
As SLF I normally keep out of Jet Blast, but as nobody seems to have answered the question: I believe the answer is generally "mutton flaps". Ref:
https://metro.co.uk/2016/01/21/mutto...-them-5636631/
25F is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2022, 00:15
  #74 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Asia
Posts: 1,376
The problem is that the manufacturer has done such a good job of forming the mix that you can convince yourself that the shavings have come from a normal joint of meat.

The combination of bread, meat, vegetables and sauces can be found in many cuisines and is simply a variation on what's locally available. The Americans use a bread roll where as the Greeks use pita bread, and so on.

The Cornish pasty is a similar concept, with a meat and vegetable mixture being baked in pastry. It was meant to be a workman's lunch which could be eaten one handed.

There was a Channel 4 documentary on the world's diets and one of the Pacific Islands came bottom. The inhabitants lived on processed and frozen American imports, high in sugar and fat. Fresh fruit and vegetables were unaffordable, diabetes and obesity were rampant. IIRC the best diet was found in an Italian village 200km from the nearest supermarket were everything was farm fresh.

​​​​​​
​​
krismiler is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2022, 02:27
  #75 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 782
[QUOTE=krismiler;11221900

There was a Channel 4 documentary on the world's diets and one of the Pacific Islands came bottom. The inhabitants lived on processed and frozen American imports, high in sugar and fat. Fresh fruit and vegetables were unaffordable, diabetes and obesity were rampant. IIRC the best diet was found in an Italian village 200km from the nearest supermarket were everything was farm fresh.

​​​​​​
​​[/QUOTE]
Interesting, I bet it wasn't always that way.
We lived on Bougainville in the mid-'70s. A trip to the native markets every week was normal, for an excellent range of fresh fish and vegetables. There was also a supermarket, but processed food was expensive, and fresh meet was either frozen, from Australia, or chilled from NZ.
The company I worked for used to supply excellent meat to the locals at one of our out camps, but whenever I visited they always had fruit bats smoking under a tarpaulin, and I think most of the fresh meat was traded for the favours of the local maidens.
Hydromet is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2022, 14:59
  #76 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Farnham Surrey
Age: 72
Posts: 5
In Aldershot, there is a kebab takeaway, Bodrum Grill having asked them on the first delivery to Farnham many years ago if they were from Bodrum which they were and informed him of the excellent run-ashore that I had there in the '70s. We now get very generous portions which not only are sufficient for the night of the order but enough for two subsequent large snacks. The Long Haired House Admiral and boy are not keen on the excess of onions in the salad which benefits me.
Mallan is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2022, 17:14
  #77 (permalink)  
Thought police antagonist
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Where I always have been...firmly in the real world
Posts: 1,178
Originally Posted by Jeanette D View Post
Fortuitously our local kebab shop is excellent, their kebab meat is a puréed mix of lamb shoulder and spices, formed onto the spit in store, and cooked and sliced to order.

I've had some shocking kebabs in the past though, having lived all over the world.

If you cannot recognise the meat by smell, texture or taste, and your dog backs away when you offer him a piece, file the kebab in the bin and check local newspapers for stories about missing cats 🙀

​​​​​
Not strictly true...madam has been known to sniff... and decline... both fillet and sirloin steak...not that either made regular appearances on our plates.

Staffies have been mentioned and it's true they do have a rep for being aggressive...but, this is often associated with the owners who get the breed to "enhance " their supposed " well 'ard ! " image. Having said that, last year, when being walked by madam, we encountered a Staffie, off lead ! with the owner clearly participating in her "recreational use only " social habit...madam got elevated very fast as I made an equally rapid departure with her under my arm.

As for meat sources, "some time ago " there were two Chinese restaurants in Bangor ( N.Wales) one called the Senior, which we frequented, the other, however, was less than affectionately known as the "Rin Tin Tin "..possibly due to what had been found hanging in the freezer during a recent Food Standards inspection..which we didn't.

With regard to Glasgow, it's ironic that a certain Abbey is one of the most beautiful and tranquil places I've visited....alas, their famed product doesn't seem to travel well
Krystal n chips is online now  
Old 28th Apr 2022, 22:22
  #78 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 782
From todays Sydney Morning Herald...


Hydromet is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2022, 00:35
  #79 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Asia
Posts: 1,376
I wonder if the past two years of COVID have caused a sea change in dining habits ? Proir to the pandemic, eating out and take aways were common. During the lockdowns people became used to ordering meals online and many restaurants were forced into providing deliveries in order to survive. Now having got used to the easy availability of good quality food without the need to venture out, restaurants may struggle to get dine in customers to return.

With no need to book a table, get dressed up or worry about parking and breathalysers, having the same meal at home is an attractive option when the used plates simply go into the dishwasher, alcohol is available at supermarket prices and entertainment is available on the big screen TV afterwards.

Restaurant owners no longer need a good location with high fixed costs and can operate out of a kitchen in a light industrial area with minimal staff.

The typical high street has changed beyond recognition since my youth and now consists mainly of convenience stores, take aways and charity shops. In the past there would be a fish and chip shop and possibly an Indian or Chinese take away, now there is food from the four corners of the earth on offer.

I do sympathyse with the kebab shop operators, catering to larger louts at chucking out time can't be much fun.

After reading this thread, I'll think carefully before having another shawarma and might go with more recognisable meat cooked on skewers instead.
krismiler is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.