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Modern Flawed Designs

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Modern Flawed Designs

Old 26th Feb 2022, 11:58
  #301 (permalink)  
 
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Current peeve: why can't manufacturers of built-in washing machines adopt a standard spacing for the door hinges.
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 12:56
  #302 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
Yes, but if you pump the tyre up with the valve at 6 o'clock, it's easier because you're not struggling against gravity ...
The tyres on my bike are filled with "gunk" that instantly fills small puntures. You need to have the valve at 12 o'clock when inflating the tyre, to ensure the gunk has fallen to the bottom of the tyre.
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 16:36
  #303 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by wowzz View Post
The tyres on my bike are filled with "gunk" that instantly fills small puntures. You need to have the valve at 12 o'clock when inflating the tyre, to ensure the gunk has fallen to the bottom of the tyre.
There are some viscous thorn bushes around here and I was getting a flat almost every time I rode; I hate pushing a bike ten miles and riding on a flat was not exactly good for the tire. I do have a repair kit with a small gas inflation cylinder, but that gets expensive and you need to carry tire tools. Problem solved by my local bike shop - tires with a layer of kevlar. Same weight as regular tiers, but not a single flat since I got them. A bit pricey but well worth it.
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 17:03
  #304 (permalink)  

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And if you put the bike on a conveyor belt that could rotate the wheels for you and save the effort!
Question is Stagger !
Would it Take Off 🤪

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Old 26th Feb 2022, 17:14
  #305 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Winemaker View Post
Problem solved by my local bike shop - tires with a layer of kevlar.
Reinforced bike tyres are brilliant value for money; got a new bike about 8 or 9 years ago and wrote off both (cheap) tyres within a few weeks (clipping sharp road chippings which slashed the tyre wall) and replaced them with Gator Hardshells - maybe £60 for the pair. Not one puncture over the next five years until I reluctantly stopped riding. Before buying those I'd replace a punctured tube every couple of months. Probably about £30 a year! Plus the inconvenience of a roadside tube change...
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 17:57
  #306 (permalink)  
 
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Puncture-proof tyres are great until you need to remove one, for example to replace a broken spoke.

DAMHIKT.
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 17:58
  #307 (permalink)  
 
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Conti Gatorskins are indeed a good investment, especially for touring. Won’t save you from an impact puncture, but will not puncture otherwise very often. Schwalbe Duranos are also good if looking for a lightweight tyre. Both types give 3k+ miles - excellent value for money as you say.
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 19:53
  #308 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Winemaker View Post
I hate pushing a bike ten miles and riding on a flat was not exactly good for the tire.
I always prefer the flat because hills make me tire too easily. As an aside, I'd always hope my tyres never get a puncture.
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 20:00
  #309 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Winemaker View Post
There are some viscous thorn bushes around here and I was getting a flat almost every time I rode; I hate pushing a bike ten miles and riding on a flat was not exactly good for the tire. I do have a repair kit with a small gas inflation cylinder, but that gets expensive and you need to carry tire tools. Problem solved by my local bike shop - tires with a layer of kevlar. Same weight as regular tiers, but not a single flat since I got them. A bit pricey but well worth it.
Carrying a mini pump, tire levers and a spare inner tube mean the occasional puncture is only ever an impedance of 5 mins or so. Repair the inner at home at your leisure. Never understood the catridge and emergency inflation fapproach when roadside repairs are so easy.

* don't forget to check the tyre for the cause of the puncture
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 20:16
  #310 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
Puncture-proof tyres are great until you need to remove one, for example to replace a broken spoke.

DAMHIKT.
Tubed motorbike tyres are even more "fun" at the roadside, especially when it's cold, because they become more rigid.

I've had at least one every year for the last four years - it's always been the back wheel, too. Some say that the front tyre kicks up the item causing the puncture, ready for the rear one to run over.
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 21:12
  #311 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Winemaker View Post
There are some viscous thorn bushes around here and I was getting a flat almost every time I rode; I hate pushing a bike ten miles and riding on a flat was not exactly good for the tire. I do have a repair kit with a small gas inflation cylinder, but that gets expensive and you need to carry tire tools. Problem solved by my local bike shop - tires with a layer of kevlar. Same weight as regular tiers, but not a single flat since I got them. A bit pricey but well worth it.
We put kevlar belted tyres on a mate's tandem, which pretty well eliminated punctures. When the tyres are eventually replaced, the number of small pieces of glass and wire embedded in the remaining rubber is testimony to the effectiveness of the kevlar.
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Old 26th Feb 2022, 22:29
  #312 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
Puncture-proof tyres are great until you need to remove one, for example to replace a broken spoke.

DAMHIKT.
??? My tires mount and dismount the same as regular tires and use a standard tube. I've experience very good mileage from them although they are getting a bit thin. I'm speaking about pedal bike tires, not motorcycle.

edited to add: Or cars. Human powered machines only!

Last edited by Winemaker; 27th Feb 2022 at 04:19.
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Old 27th Feb 2022, 01:01
  #313 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ATNotts View Post
Can I add the tyre pressure warning light on Volkswagen Audi Group vehicles. The number of times I had had a false warning is now so great that I ignore it (the crying wolf syndrome) unless I can feel changes in the way the vehicle is handling. The thing is almost totally pointless. And then there is the ACC cruise control that applies the brakes when you're exiting the motorway up a slip road and passing a slower vehicle on your right. If that is as good as self driving cars ever got they'd be a total liability.

Cars generally have far too much tech, and far too many warning systems nowadays.
I have an Audi and have experienced both problems. It seems that the tyre pressure warning system needs a confirmation that you are happy with the pressure as it stands (usually after a pressure check) and that then becomes the baseline for any pressure change.
The ACC can be a pain and really needs to be more off than on
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Old 27th Feb 2022, 06:48
  #314 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Winemaker View Post
I'm speaking about pedal bike tires, not motorcycle.
So am I. Plenty of advice on the net on how to overcome the difficulty of fitting puncture-proof tyres.


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Old 27th Feb 2022, 08:32
  #315 (permalink)  
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Useful tip that, I developed pretty strong thumbs over 40+ years getting the last bit of bead over the rim on countless occasions. Another thing is to always check the rim tape is still straight. I had a whole series of punctures and couldn't find the culprit embedded in the tyre; a colleague immediately suggested I checked the tape - a short stretch had shifted and the tubes were fretting on spoke holes.

(A bonus point to anyone who can identify the aircraft in Dave's video above - I can't! )
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Old 2nd Mar 2022, 22:30
  #316 (permalink)  
 
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I don't understand. Why don't you just arrange to have a car follow you with three or four replacement bikes strapped to the roof?

From watching television I thought that was standard practice
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Old 3rd Mar 2022, 03:45
  #317 (permalink)  
 
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A twist on the ‘I don’t want my car to do this automatically’ theme: Why on Earth doesn’t my car do this automatically?

My Ford Ranger does a bunch of things automatically that leave me uttering: WTF? But when I fold in the side mirrors in parking lots, after I park, to reduce the risk of contact with adjacent people and vehicles, do you reckon they subsequently fold out automatically when I start the car again or put it in reverse? Nope!

When I ask myself: “What would be the durr-obvious useful automatic function?, I answer: “Automatic fold out side mirrors!” Do the engineers really think we’re parking in such narrow spaces that we fold in the side mirrors first and can’t fold them out before reversing out? How could we get out of the car if the space is that narrow? We couldn’t open the doors to get out, if the space was that narrow!

There are probably a million like this: Instructions that leave out a fundamental step. Just helped someone move into a house with you-beaut automatic watering timers that connect to your ‘smart’ phone. The instructions and the FAQ made zero mention of the fact that you must enter the physical address of the unit in order for the clock to set. Not a single syllable. And no way of setting the clock manually.

The ‘welcome to your easy to use gadget’ email – naturally you have to set up an account – included an email address for questions. I sent an email to that address and received a “no longer working” response. The instructions did include a requirement to write down the MAC address printed on the bottom of the unit. However, that information was used nowhere in the set-up process.

I’m sometimes tempted to believe that the people who come up with these instructions get their jollies from leaving out something critically important. On that subject….

The new home into which I’ve just helped someone to move contained some acts of pure genius. I truly believe that they were done as a ‘piss take’ on whoever was going to discover the implications. This is a picture of the tap for the very expensive, plumbed fridge that I was trying to install. Note the adapter sleeve is tightened up against the tap, such that the tap can’t be turned. After all, why would you want to turn the tap on? The same genius installed the taps for the washing machine in a position that made it impossible to connect the washing machine hoses to them. Talk about laugh!

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Old 3rd Mar 2022, 06:25
  #318 (permalink)  
 
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CK, what you need there is an adaptor for that adaptor.
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Old 3rd Mar 2022, 06:45
  #319 (permalink)  
 
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People not doing stuff like this properly does my head in. The workaround (which is probably what the previous owner did after realising their balls-up):
1. Remove knob from tap
2. Turn on/off using pliers, adjustable spanner etc
3. Replace knob
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Old 3rd Mar 2022, 07:33
  #320 (permalink)  
 
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Look for a slimmer adaptor. Or get a friend with a lathe to turn down the top of the brass adaptor. Or cut a mill or so off the top yourself with a hacksaw.

Or cut a couple of mill off the bottom of the tap knob to clear the brass fitting.
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