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Do I really need a replacement hip.

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Do I really need a replacement hip.

Old 30th Aug 2021, 21:49
  #1 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: UK.
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Do I really need a replacement hip.

Hi all.....been for my pre opp today regarding have a replacement hip joint fitted.

My last X-Ray was prob over 2 years ago....I spoke to my surgeon maybe 12months ago....he said he will need to get my hip X-Rayed again to see how it is now.....but that doest look like I will be having an X-ray before Surgery

My opp date could be in 2 weeks....BUT! I am worried that my hip may not be as bad as it could be....granted in bed it can wake me up....I may struggle to get my leg comfortable.....or find I cannot move it to find a comfortable position without tweaking it with my other foot.

But once out of bed after the first stiff few steps it eases off and I am waking un aided...I never need a stick.

If I have been sitting a while I have to push myself up granted.....but once up I maybe bent over a bit....but once I straighten up and take say 4 steps I can walk comparatively ok.

I ride a motor bike....my bad leg is my right leg.....its a struggle to cock my leg up and over the seat.....I ease my self into the car backward....lifting my right leg in in not easy......getting out I may need to help my leg over the step.....once out and standing.....I am stiff around the legs hip area.....but take a few steps and I free up.

I dont feel very energetic with my leg.....getting up from kneeling or sitting on the floor working on something is not easy.

Anybody that has had anything to do with replacement hip joints.....does it sound like mine is worn out.

I would hate to have surgery only to find I feel the same and it was unnecessary.

I fear asking my Surgeon in case he thinks me a time waster and just bumps me off his list.





Last edited by magpienja; 30th Aug 2021 at 22:01.
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Old 30th Aug 2021, 22:11
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BFM
 
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The xray isn't much help once it has confirmed the start of degradation. Clinical features and in particular interference with daily activities, notably sleep are more important. For what it's worth your description sounds as though yours is ready for a refresh. The outcome of hip surgery these days is excellent. I donít obviously have full details but I think you should relax and look forward to getting about again. It's not going to get better, is it?
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Old 30th Aug 2021, 22:16
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Thats reassuring I thank you.....I should have said....the last X-ray I had was maybe 2 years ago.....the surgeon said look its bone on bone.

I started thinking to myself though over the last few days.....surly I should be in more discomfort....maybe I am just making allowance for it and I haven't realised.

But for Covid....I would have been in long ago I think.

I am 68.

I am a born worrier unfortunately.
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Old 30th Aug 2021, 22:18
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How much pain are you in? Do you take anti inflammatory tablets. Wife has had hip pain for a number of years and has seen a surgeon but the decision has been made to keep going with it as it is. Don't forget new hips have a lifespan so you might need another in the future possibly ten years.
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Old 30th Aug 2021, 22:23
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BFM
 
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There you go - bone on bone for two years! Time to go. The unpleasant truth is also that, in the UK, if you turn it down now it will be another two years before you get offered it again as services remain under huge strain. You're quite constrained in your activities if you reflect on it a bit.
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Old 30th Aug 2021, 22:25
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BFM
 
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Originally Posted by N707ZS View Post
How much pain are you in? Do you take anti inflammatory tablets. Wife has had hip pain for a number of years and has seen a surgeon but the decision has been made to keep going with it as it is. Don't forget new hips have a lifespan so you might need another in the future possibly ten years.
Not these days with hybrids. They should last 20 years.
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Old 31st Aug 2021, 01:41
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Join Date: May 2002
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Mag.....I have had both hips done....DO. NOT HESITATE!

If you are hurting and the bad hip(s) adversely affect your quality of life.....get the replacement(s).

When you wake up your arthritic pain or that bone to bone pain is GONE.

You butt will hurt.....but with good pain meds taken in advance of the pain (trust me on this as I tried the John Wayne approach and that was a huge mistake) in a week you will be over that and back on yer pegs working back up to normal again.

Each time I was on a Walker for a couple of days just to keep from doing something stupid.....then on a Cane for a week....then back to somewhat normal walking.

There are some limitations you will encounter depending upon the procedure used to do the replacement.

Both mine were the old fashioned way....and that entailed a bit more abuse of muscle tissue which led to the soreness issue.

The more modern forward side method is easier on you. Each come with some limitations on kinds of movement you have to be careful about.

Get it done and get back to living your life pain free.
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Old 31st Aug 2021, 11:25
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Man Bilong Balus long PNG
 
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Wot SASless said!

I have only had one hip done, (RHS) and that was due to the fact that I actually had a broken hip, but I was walking unaided two weeks after the Op. Only needed a pair of crutches for about 5 days and one for the next 11 days, but after that...

The only reason it took so long to get rid of the crutches is that I had the broken hip for four months, and was on crutches for that entire time!
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Old 31st Aug 2021, 13:17
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Can't comment on how badly you need it. But my daughter had a hip replacement a few weeks ago (congenital problem, she's in her late 30s). It was pretty much miraculous. WIthin a couple of weeks she was walking round the house. At six weeks she was fully recovered. Of course there's a risk with any op, but if you're suffering, go for it. Yes, you might need another replacement in 20-30 years, but given your description of the problem, otherwise you'll be in a wheelchair long before that anyway.
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Old 31st Aug 2021, 13:39
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Mrs Radeng has an aunt who is 95, and who fell over two weeks ago. She actually only cracked her hip, but the fitted the artificial one that night and she was on her feet using a walking frame two days later. As she lives alone - she was widowed in May after 76 years of marriage - there are carers coming in twice a day for a few weeks. Amazing what they do these days...
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Old 31st Aug 2021, 20:12
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My RAF surgeon said he would 'cut me' when I couldn't play 18 holes. The pain in my LHS hip just got worse and I was eventually booked for surgery. The nadir was whilst on holiday; we were in a hotel in SFO, I had taken the anti inflammatory tabs and co-codamol for the breakthrough pain yet I had no relief standing, sitting or laying down. I PVR'd in the January yet the RAF kept its word and I had the surgery in the June of that year in a private hospital. Due to my relative 'youth' the replacement was uncemented which evidently makes replacement easier. I was instantly pain free, the downside was six weeks non-weight bearing. I'm still going 24 years later.
So MAG, for what it's worth, my advice is get it done.

PS. Never again in a private hospital; I started getting worried about the apparent disorganised system and making notes on the first day, and my fears proved justified.
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Old 31st Aug 2021, 22:01
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I will go totally with SASless's comments. I'm eight weeks after having my second hip done, no pain(!!) its wonderful to be walking normally again, got to be careful about bending but yes have it done and as another said if you have a "slot" TAKE it there may not be another for a long time.

Cliver
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Old 2nd Sep 2021, 08:47
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"Mrs Radeng has an aunt who is 95, and who fell over two weeks ago. She actually only cracked her hip.............."

I think that 'normally' the head of the femur - the long thigh bone - breaks, owing to osteoporosis or whatever, and this is what causes the fall? So it is usually not actually a broken hip, but a broken femur. I watched a few 'hip' operations while working on various Hospital Watch programmes in the '80's. Impressive how soon patients can put load on the newly cemented joint.
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Old 2nd Sep 2021, 10:51
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Friend of mine had a hip replacement at not much over 50 - they said a combination of rugby and running had worn it out. Sister had a knee done last year - both said how much better life is. My knees probably need doing, or maybe steroid injections, but I'll go a bit longer before asking unless things deteriorate. Early morning is worst, I tend to totter a bit till things loosen up (think Kenny More playing Douglas Bader). Finally getting round to putting hand rails back on my stairs (after 25 years!) was a sensible move!
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Old 2nd Sep 2021, 11:29
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Man Bilong Balus long PNG
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Now officially on Life's scrap heap, now being an Age Pensioner and not liking it one little bit! I'd rather be flying but in the meantime still continuing the never ending search for a bad bottle of Red!
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Well, that has been a fairly good positive reply to your question, magpienja.

Got the hint yet, maybe?

(think Kenny More playing Douglas Bader).
Strange you should say that, treadigraph. I have recently had more than one person remark to me, upon observing me climb into the gliding Club's Pawnee, that my actions in doing so is somewhat similar!

ie; Swing the right leg into the cockpit and lift the left into it when half seated. Well.... that's how I get into a Pawnee anyway...

Seriously Maggy; Get it done! You will not regret it!!
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Old 3rd Sep 2021, 02:28
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Some pretty positive responses here. I've not had the experience, but I did severe my left quad tendon in a climbing accident, which (obviously) necessitated surgery as my leg was a limp noodle. My observation is that the physical therapy required to get back to operating condition was the hardest and most important part. I did PT twice a week for six months and am fully functioning again; do what they ask with enthusiasm and determination. Any other approach is giving up. My neighbor had hip replacements last year and is very happy with the result, although he can't catch me in a foot race.... I had a very bad psychic reaction to the opiate pain meds and was unable to get deep sleep or dream; I threw them away after two days as the pain was preferable. Constipation was also an issue.... I have no idea why anyone would actively pursue Oxycontin.
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Old 3rd Sep 2021, 02:52
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Had an accident at age 42 and had most of the cartilage removed from my hip. Went from annoying to needing crutches just to walk. Tried to tough it out for a year and finally saw a different surgeon who told me I needed a hip. Had a metal prosthesis placed (wear is about a micron per year, but it required the old-fashioned lateral approach, rather than the minimally invasive anterior one) and regardless, I was up walking in the hospital that day. (Nurses were griping at me to get back in bed, but it was so much fun to walk without pain that I just couldnít help myself) Got my medical renewed without any sort of special issuance or other guff from the FAA when it came due, and never looked back

Retrospectively, I canít imaging why I waited that long. I donít run for fun anymore, but I donít even know I ever had an issue otherwise.

Just do it and get on with your life.
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Old 3rd Sep 2021, 03:22
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
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My observation is that the physical therapy required to get back to operating condition was the hardest and most important part. I did PT twice a week for six months and am fully functioning again; do what they ask
I have had both sides replaced and 15 and 18 years later I had the plastic bearing surfaces replaced. This was needed as the plastic had started to shed microscopic particles which causes the immune system to set up a reaction that can attack the supporting bone structure.
Revisions are a bit more complicated than the initial procedure but I am doing well, (still walk the 18 holes at 80).

Have to agree with the above quote, your re-hab is the second half of your procedure and carrying that out fully will only increase the success of the whole thing.
Next year will be thirty years since my replacements and it really gave me back my everyday life, including at the time my licence. Really not much you can't do although as my surgeon said when I asked about skiing, "Did not say couldn't but perhaps shouldn't. If you bust them up it might be hard to put Humpty Dumpty back together again.
He said It is one of the most frequent surgical procedures, at least in North America, and one of the most successful in percentage terms.
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Old 3rd Sep 2021, 06:11
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And limited mobility such as you describe will have knock-on health consequences.

A relative of mine suffered a devastating stroke which 3 years later is still having terrible impact on his family. He was very overweight with limited mobility as a result of hip problems, in turn a result of years of rugby playing. He had refused to have the hips done due to a fear of hospitals, and ironically he is now totally dependent on carers and hospitals for his daily life.

Do it!
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Old 3rd Sep 2021, 07:57
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Winemaker

your comments regarding OPIATES, I had my hip done, home after three days, A and E three days later, Months of codine phosphates plus oromorphine during the op the outcome of which some of you will recognise!! The Doc on duty took one look and sorted out the main problem and then told me to throw away any pain killers. What followed was an interesting couple of weeks😰

C

Last edited by cliver029; 3rd Sep 2021 at 08:00. Reason: Typo
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