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Diesel engines, then and now

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Diesel engines, then and now

Old 16th May 2021, 23:27
  #81 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by fltlt View Post
Perhaps you may be interested in the Achates 3cyl opposed Diesel engine that hits the road in a WalMart truck within a couple of weeks.
Interesting story, excellent specs, candidate for Military applications as well.
One bank of a Napier Deltic?
Or a Commer knocker?
Or a Sulzer?
Nothing new under the sun


Complexity killed the cat
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Old 16th May 2021, 23:33
  #82 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by WingNut60 View Post
One bank of a Napier Deltic?
Or a Commer knocker?
Or a Sulzer?
Nothing new under the sun

Napier Deltic

Complexity killed the cat
In this case it appears to also exceed 2027 particulate limits, and IF it works in the real world as good as on the dyno, WallyWorld expect to shave $100 million off of their $300 million annual fuel bill.
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Old 16th May 2021, 23:39
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Originally Posted by fltlt View Post
In this case it appears to also exceed 2027 particulate limits, and IF it works in the real world as good as on the dyno, WallyWorld expect to shave $100 million off of their $300 million annual fuel bill.
Opposed piston configuration is notable for low emissions.
Cost and complexity of additional crankshaft is offset, to some extent, by omission of camshaft(s) & valve gear.

And 1/2 the number of cylinders gives you the same displacement.
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Old 17th May 2021, 01:36
  #84 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by WingNut60 View Post
Opposed piston configuration is notable for low emissions.
Cost and complexity of additional crankshaft is offset, to some extent, by omission of camshaft(s) & valve gear.

And 1/2 the number of cylinders gives you the same displacement.
According to folks that actually know, the 3 cyl configuration is the optimum for scavenging/pulse waves.
There are som interesting videos on u toob, including how WalMart got involved.
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Old 17th May 2021, 16:35
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From WingNut - Or a Commer knocker?

I still think the TS3 produced one of the most glorious sounds.
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Old 17th May 2021, 17:45
  #86 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by fltlt View Post
According to folks that actually know, the 3 cyl configuration is the optimum for scavenging/pulse waves.
There are som interesting videos on u toob, including how WalMart got involved.
They work better as a two stroke because they can be made to be very smoothly balanced in the dynamic sense because they fire every time the pistons reach TDC. Having three cylinders as a four stroke setup means that two cylinders fire during one rotation and only one on the other, despite having a 120 degree crank. This results in a rocking motion in the longitudinal sense (nose up /nose down).
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Old 17th May 2021, 23:33
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Can't let this thread go on any longer without mention of the man credited with the invention of the technology and to which he gave his surname: Rudolph Diesel.

For those who enjoy a good conspiracy yarn, he vanished in 1913 from a steamer in mysterious circumstances enroute to London from Antwerp, for a meeting of the Consolidated Diesel Manufacturing Company, many theories have been discussed over the years as to what actually happened to him. Fascinating story.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_Diesel
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Old 19th May 2021, 00:48
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Originally Posted by vne165 View Post
Can't let this thread go on any longer without mention of the man credited with the invention of the technology and to which he gave his surname: Rudolph Diesel.

For those who enjoy a good conspiracy yarn, he vanished in 1913 from a steamer in mysterious circumstances enroute to London from Antwerp, for a meeting of the Consolidated Diesel Manufacturing Company, many theories have been discussed over the years as to what actually happened to him. Fascinating story.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_Diesel
Sorry vne165 - that's not very fast! - but you have repeated a commonly held but erroneous view. Rudolph Diesel did much development work on the compression ignition principle when at MAN (Geburtsstatte des Dieselmotoren 1893 - 1897), but he did not invent that type of engine. Credit for this feat goes to Yorkshireman Herbert Akroyd Stuart.



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Old 19th May 2021, 02:37
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Ah GQ not so fast either.
The Ackroyd engine was not technically a compression ignition engine though, was it?
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Old 20th May 2021, 20:12
  #90 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by vne165 View Post
Ah GQ not so fast either.
The Ackroyd engine was not technically a compression ignition engine though, was it?
Well, I was a bit faster - most things I flew had a VNE well in excess of 165!

I suppose whether or not the Ackroyd engine fitted the description rather depended on its temperature. External heating of the bulb was required only when starting from cold since at that time it was not possible to generate sufficient pressure to ignite the fuel - Boyle or Charles, I can't remember. Once under way, the engine ran unassisted. The pre-heating was analogous to the use of glow plugs and the bulb arrangement was really no different from the pre-combustion chamber used on many modern indirect injection CI engines, so I think it fair to regard old Herb's machine as a "diesel" although, personally, I would prefer that, generically, the type had been called something else.



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Old 21st May 2021, 04:38
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Originally Posted by SnowFella View Post
Back in the mid 90's I did my Army service running a refueling rig for a Nordic brigade of the Swedish Army. Halfway through someone came up with the great idea of swapping out the 2 stroke pumps we used for a diesel variant, big spiel that the fancy new pump even comes with an electric starter motor so no more need for hand starting it.
Shame the boffin that came up with the idea forgot that all the NATO leads on the rigs had been disabled due to the risk of sparks when plugging things in. Lots of "fun" were had trying to hand start those darn diesel pumps in the cold and dark of a Swedish winter.
From memory they had a mechanical lifter that limited compression and allowed you to turn the motor over, lifter closed after a few revolutions. If you had managed to yank hard enough on the starter rope there was just enough inertia for one stroke with compression.
worked in a galena mine eons back doing exploration, very important to refuel the generator every day. Took about an hour of hand cranking(crew of 4 taking turns) until sufficiently warmed up to keep running
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Old 22nd May 2021, 11:27
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Originally Posted by Ancient Mariner View Post
Thankfully there are none.
Per
​​
There often are. A steel sealing ring. And yes, not a 5 minute job but we could have the head off one of those in less than an hour.
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Old 22nd May 2021, 22:55
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Originally Posted by helimutt View Post
There often are. A steel sealing ring. And yes, not a 5 minute job but we could have the head off one of those in less than an hour.
Sorry, in my old head there's a difference between a gasket and a seal ring. And removing a cylinder head these days is a piece of cake, what with hydraulic tools and quick couplings and what have you. And even without these modernities we could have a head of in less than one hour. Had to have the piston in, out and head back on before 17:00 hrs.
There were drinks and companion waiting shoreside. 😁
Per
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Old 4th Jun 2021, 18:45
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Apparently JCB are testing a modified diesel engine that uses hydrogen for combustion - claims that it will be more effective than batteries for large heavy vehicles. Anybody know more?
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