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GU10 lamps

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GU10 lamps

Old 28th Feb 2021, 17:11
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GU10 lamps

Does anyone know who invented the GU10 lamp fitting. What would be a suitable punishment for them? I'm not sure what I would choose save that it should be cruel and unusual.
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 17:16
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Mine all seem to work ok - what's your issue?
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 17:19
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Originally Posted by Tone View Post
Does anyone know who invented the GU10 lamp fitting. What would be a suitable punishment for them? I'm not sure what I would choose save that it should be cruel and unusual.
​​​​​​?...??.....?????.???????
Per
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 17:21
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Well, they're not very user-friendly if you happen to be balanced on wobbly stepladder.
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 17:23
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For a moment there I thought the residents of Guildford must have different light fittings from us here with a GU9 post code.
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 17:31
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According to a well known internet site the basic bi-pin base was invented by Reginald Fessenden for the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago.

I like them and happily stand one legged on a wobbly ladder to fit them. But I am an amputee...


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Old 28th Feb 2021, 18:01
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I think the problem is not with the lamp or the bi-pin base, but rather with the way that they are buried at the bottom (Top?) of a fire proof, ceiling recessed, enclosure.

Nightmare, I allowed an electrician to install them in bathrooms and kitchen of my UK house. Big mistake.

IG
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 18:38
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If you want to hold up a connector for ridicule, I give you ...

The SCART
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 18:56
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Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 View Post
If you want to hold up a connector for ridicule, I give you ...

The SCART
What's wrong with SCART?
Per
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 19:02
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Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 View Post
If you want to hold up a connector for ridicule, I give you ...

The SCART
I raise you: DIN
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 19:22
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Originally Posted by Ancient Mariner View Post
What's wrong with SCART?
Per
There is no retention. If you can manage to fit the plug into its socket behind a TV, the slightest movement of the cable makes it fall out.
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 19:25
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Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 View Post
There is no retention. If you can manage to fit the plug into its socket behind a TV, the slightest movement of the cable makes it fall out.
never had that problem myself, they push tightly in and hold. Well on Panasonic, Samsung, Phillips, Nad, Sharp, various Sky Boxes, JVC equipment anyway.
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 19:29
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Originally Posted by ex82watcher View Post
For a moment there I thought the residents of Guildford must have different light fittings from us here with a GU9 post code.
Don't know why it would bother Guildford residents - we GU10 residents are in The Bourne (south of Farnham).



PDR
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 19:55
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So PDR1, when you leave home how do you manage to get back in? Do you have kind neighbours who apply suction cups to your back and attampt to feed you through the letterbox?
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 20:56
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I’m going to annoy our American cousins now, but those strange tinny pins they have on their plugs - what is that about? They never seem to fit flush and fall out too easily. They don’t have a sensible on/off switch next to them and just to remind you what you’re dealing with, they occasionally give you a nice white flash of electricity as you unplug. I’ve even had occasion to hold the socket against the wall as I withdraw (if you’ll excuse the double entendres) to prevent the thing coming with the plug.

Give me a good, chunky British three pin plug any day!
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 21:17
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Originally Posted by Tone View Post
Does anyone know who invented the GU10 lamp fitting. What would be a suitable punishment for them? I'm not sure what I would choose save that it should be cruel and unusual.
Need a like button here! I share your pain. And IKEA seems to love the GU10. Grrr..
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 21:56
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Then there was the British bayonet fitting while most of the rest of the world uses the Edison Screw. There was a brief vogue over here for GU10 and it is still around but most of the fittings, especially pot lights, are fitted with ES and there are LED lamps in pretty well all the sizes to fit them. For those who like the GU10s, or the particular fittings they fit, we can get adapters with cables attached to an ES fitting at one end and GU10 socket at the other.

I fitted GU10 to everything in the house I built but as soon as the ES LEDs were available I fitted them to the next renovation. The latest, which I am sure you have over there by now is a flat LED fitting that goes straight into an insulated ceiling and they are down to about $10 each. Personally I prefer "sunk" lights, (where you can not see the lamp obliquely) to the flat ones where the lamp is visible all round but to tell the truth my kids have fitted the latter all over their houses and after a few minutes you don't notice.
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 22:18
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I find no problem fitting a GU10 bulb to its socket, its the spring clips that I have to hold them in which are a pain. It just takes a bulb with a slight different thickness and twang you get the spring in your face whilst balancing on a stool.
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Old 28th Feb 2021, 22:57
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Lightbulb

Originally Posted by ChrisVJ View Post
Then there was the British bayonet fitting while most of the rest of the world uses the Edison Screw. There was a brief vogue over here for GU10 and it is still around but most of the fittings, especially pot lights, are fitted with ES and there are LED lamps in pretty well all the sizes to fit them. For those who like the GU10s, or the particular fittings they fit, we can get adapters with cables attached to an ES fitting at one end and GU10 socket at the other.

I fitted GU10 to everything in the house I built but as soon as the ES LEDs were available I fitted them to the next renovation. The latest, which I am sure you have over there by now is a flat LED fitting that goes straight into an insulated ceiling and they are down to about $10 each. Personally I prefer "sunk" lights, (where you can not see the lamp obliquely) to the flat ones where the lamp is visible all round but to tell the truth my kids have fitted the latter all over their houses and after a few minutes you don't notice.
Bayonet is much better than the Edison screw - one quarter turn and it's in - bosh!
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Old 1st Mar 2021, 00:50
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Bayonet is much better than the Edison screw - one quarter turn and it's in - bosh!
But sometimes, the solder-like blobs melt onto the fixture and it completely resists the push-in pressure to allow it to turn for removal, making me break the bulb and use pliers on the metal bits to get the rotten thing out.
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