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A New Scam?

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A New Scam?

Old 11th Jan 2021, 14:12
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A New Scam?

SmartDot radiation-protection phone stickers 'have no effect':


https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-55613452
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 14:39
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Sadly, scams like these seem all to easy to put together by the unscrupulous. Social media has provided a rich spawning ground for nut job ideas, and there are always some who will fall for a bit of carefully crafted pseudo-science in an advert, especially if the product is "reassuringly expensive".

There have been similar scams to this before, like the ordinary USB stick that was sold as "anti 5G" protection devices, again for a ludicrous price, with equally ludicrous claims. They are the modern day equivalent of the snake oil sales people from a century or more ago.
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 15:04
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... Energydots says they "counteract the harmful energy emitted by wireless and electronic equipment" to aid sleep, cure headaches and give a clearer mind.

But University of Surrey tests for BBC News found no evidence of any effect.
Shucks, I guess that means I will just have to go on having sleepless nights and cluttered mind from sleeping next to me phone
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 15:14
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Smile

Originally Posted by lomapaseo View Post
Shucks, I guess that means I will just have to go on having sleepless nights and cluttered mind from sleeping next to me phone
instead of your partner?
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 16:14
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How many people will think..

"Yes, but what is the University of Surrey have got it wrong. Perhaps it would be safer to buy one and use it, just in case!"
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 16:32
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I heard about this earlier. The scam company spokesperson said, when confronted with the test evidence, something along the lines of the paper dot uses "scalar energy, which the scientists' equipment can't detect".

Good reason it can't be detected....
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 16:37
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Scalar Energy
Electromagnetic waves which exist only in the vacuum of empty space constitute an ocean of infinite energy called scalar energy. ... These new waves of energy are called “longitudinal” EM (electromagnetism) to distinguish them from “transverse” EM
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 16:42
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The one from last year comes to mind, a "5G BioShield" USB stick purchased from China for a fiver and being re-sold by a scam company for 339 each, or (as a special offer) three of them for 958.80. it turned out that the only difference between the ~5 Chinese made USB stick and the 339 "5G BioShield" (apart from the price) was a small, round, sticker. The BBC did a bit about that scam: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-52810220

Same sort of pseudo-science used in the description, with the "5G BioShield". This quote from the BBC article seems somewhat similar in language to the latest scam:

The 5GBioShield was recommended by a member of Glastonbury Town Council's 5G Advisory Committee, which has called for an inquiry into 5G.

One of nine external members, Toby Hall, said: "We use this device and find it helpful," and provided a link to its website, which describes it as a USB key that "provides protection for your home and family, thanks to the wearable holographic nano-layer catalyser, which can be worn or placed near to a smartphone or any other electrical, radiation or EMF [electromagnetic field] emitting device".

"Through a process of quantum oscillation, the 5GBioShield USB key balances and re-harmonises the disturbing frequencies arising from the electric fog induced by devices, such as laptops, cordless phones, wi-fi, tablets, et cetera,"
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 16:51
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
Sadly, scams like these seem all to easy to put together by the unscrupulous. Social media has provided a rich spawning ground for nut job ideas, and there are always some who will fall for a bit of carefully crafted pseudo-science in an advert, especially if the product is "reassuringly expensive".

There have been similar scams to this before, like the ordinary USB stick that was sold as "anti 5G" protection devices, again for a ludicrous price, with equally ludicrous claims. They are the modern day equivalent of the snake oil sales people from a century or more ago.
I think you could say that about pretty much any ladies cosmetic item on the main stream tv channels.
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 23:04
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The dots don't work. You really need a 5G Beanie
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Old 12th Jan 2021, 00:40
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....Through a process of quantum oscillation.....

ah yes, the inevitable use of that magic word *quantum* to explain the unexplainable.

The cynical exploiting the stupid.
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Old 12th Jan 2021, 02:28
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One way of accessing if an email is a scam, is to press reply and see what ISP address it came from. If it doesn't look genuine, then it probably isn't. Iknow people who were done on the PayPal scam.

Last edited by RichardJones; 12th Jan 2021 at 12:55.
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Old 12th Jan 2021, 15:23
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Originally Posted by RichardJones View Post
One way of accessing if an email is a scam, is to press reply and see what ISP address it came from. If it doesn't look genuine, then it probably isn't. Iknow people who were done on the PayPal scam.
Where has E Mail been mentioned?
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Old 12th Jan 2021, 16:56
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Originally Posted by RichardJones View Post
One way of accessing if an email is a scam, is to press reply and see what ISP address it came from. If it doesn't look genuine, then it probably isn't.
None of my email addresses include any "ISP address".
One is @gmail.com, the rest are @ my own personal domain name, which most certainly is not an ISP.
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Old 12th Jan 2021, 20:40
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Yeah ok. You know what I am trying to convey. If it's from a genuine paypal address, it would state paypal in the email address that was sent. Instead it maybe, hotmail or gmail for eg.

No I'm not that smart but smart enough not to be scammed. If my, probably useless post to most, helps someone to just think what they there doing, my contribution is worth it to me. Just trying to offer some constructive input that has helped keep me and pthers out of trouble with scam emails, which are still prevalent.

Nit pick all you like.
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Old 12th Jan 2021, 21:00
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Originally Posted by RichardJones View Post
Yeah ok. You know what I am trying to convey. If it's from a genuine paypal address, it would state paypal in the email address that was sent. Instead it maybe, hotmail or gmail for eg.

No I'm not that smart but smart enough not to be scammed. If my, probably useless post to most, helps someone to just think what they there doing, my contribution is worth it to me. Just trying to offer some constructive input that has helped keep me and pthers out of trouble with scam emails, which are still prevalent.

Nit pick all you like.
The point is that this thread has nothing at all to do with email, or email scams. It's simply about an openly advertised product that is clearly a scam.
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Old 18th Jan 2021, 21:15
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Genuinely expecting a package tomorrow via Royal Mail - valid tracking number etc. Today received the following text message from 07537 ***416555:

{Quick Mod Note: dear posters, please don't click on that link, all precautions considered.}

The link was edited down to read https://royalmail-packages.co

Obvious mistakes were the reference to “GBP” rather than “”, and “.co” rather than “.com”, and the phone number is a known scammer.

Did they know I was expecting a package, in which case the implications are quite profound, or is it just coincidence?

Last edited by Senior Pilot; 19th Jan 2021 at 18:09. Reason: Remove phone number link
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Old 18th Jan 2021, 21:21
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My money - all 2.99 GBP - is on an unfortunate statistical coincidence .... not least because of the s word.
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Old 18th Jan 2021, 22:05
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Originally Posted by RichardJones View Post
One way of accessing if an email is a scam, is to press reply and see what ISP address it came from. If it doesn't look genuine, then it probably isn't. Iknow people who were done on the PayPal scam.
Actually, this is probably the worst advice as your email program will engage the embedded links to verify you as a valid target while you are checking the return link. This valuable information makes your email address a better target to onsell to other spammers as the spammer now knows there is a human behind the scenes that reads their scum.
Better to just examine the headers of the email as it still is safely ensconced in your junk folder. Faking email sender addresses is so simple, and catches out so many people.

The spammers are often global operations, well run with advanced artificial intelligence and massive computing power behind the scenes, run by cartels. Easy money, and often they use your infected computer to do their dirty work.

Always report to SpamCop. It helps them build a global spam database and their internal spam reporting channels often result in takedowns far more efficiently than going through ISP support channels. Hit them in the wallet is something they understand.

Question: Given the enormous resources expended worldwide to identify, block, and delete spam, how many people would throw in a few hundred dollars to a crowd fund to deploy a real fast moving mobile swat team to terminate these scum with extreme prejudice - you know, grenades, ammunition, bombs, and violence - things that even the criminal spammers understand? If digital terrorism was treated the same as other terrorist activity, rather then just shrugging the shoulder and pressing the delete key, how quickly this would all end? Recall the last time there was an airliner hijack? Me neither. What brought about the change from the weekly news reports a few decades ago? Digital terrorists should receive the same treatment. Exterminate with extreme prejudice!

As an aside, heard about the long existing bug in Windows that holds a short command that will scramble your disk contents as it causes a BSOD? It could arrive as a benign payload and execute without you even opening it. Microsoft are aware of it and are looking to fix it, real soon now. Your mum taught you to never ignore the wet paint sign. Never click on anything suspicious to see what happens.

Last edited by Thirsty; 18th Jan 2021 at 22:33.
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Old 18th Jan 2021, 22:07
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Originally Posted by QTG View Post
Obvious mistakes were the reference to “GBP” rather than “”, and “.co” rather than “.com”, and the phone number is a known scammer.

Did they know I was expecting a package, in which case the implications are quite profound, or is it just coincidence?
A lot of scammers are dumb, otherwise they would move to more profitable enterprises such as politics and religion.

Last edited by Thirsty; 18th Jan 2021 at 22:34.
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