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Christmas TV charity Ads OTT

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Christmas TV charity Ads OTT

Old 5th Dec 2020, 17:33
  #1 (permalink)  
iws
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Nr. Edinburgh
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Christmas TV charity Ads OTT

Pardon me for sounding a bit like Scrooge , but at this time of year the TV Charity Ads are reaching their usual peak.

I need advice - should I sponsor a child here or one overseas?
Also, should I sponsor a Tiger, Donkey, Hippo, Elephant or Guide Dog?

If I were to sponsor all of them I would be the one needing financial assistance.

What I find iniquitous are the adds targeting children. You know the ones - follow
Paddington on his travels etc. What a clever way to hook into a family.
And notice that ads don't ask for a donation - they ask you to set up a procedure
for continuing debits.

Maybe this should be in the "Rants" thread?
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 17:44
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Covid had destroyed their normal, less pushy, income streams.

Rob
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 17:46
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Originally Posted by iws View Post
Pardon me for sounding a bit like Scrooge , but at this time of year the TV Charity Ads are reaching their usual peak.

I need advice - should I sponsor a child here or one overseas?
Also, should I sponsor a Tiger, Donkey, Hippo, Elephant or Guide Dog?

If I were to sponsor all of them I would be the one needing financial assistance.

What I find iniquitous are the adds targeting children. You know the ones - follow
Paddington on his travels etc. What a clever way to hook into a family.
And notice that ads don't ask for a donation - they ask you to set up a procedure
for continuing debits.

Maybe this should be in the "Rants" thread?
I'll certainly pardon you!!

You can sit and watch an hour long TV programme on a weekday afternoon, calculator in hand, and tot up how much you would spend were you to give 2, 3 or whatever per month to each of the charities begging in the commercial breaks within that hour. And what is worse, to get around GDPR they are not now simply asking you to text to have whatever monthly amount lifted from your account, they have become cleverer, by asking you to text so that someone can call you to extract the requested amount 9or more if their sales people are any good) whilst you, having accepted their invitation have essentially, unless you are very careful, agreed to receive their begging calls going forward, and 3 per month pretty soon becomes 5 per month, becomes 7 per month etc etc.

And why exactly to you need a cuddly Labrador toy and regular "pupdates" if you sign up to Guide Dogs for The Blind. Surely your motivation should be to ensure the charity gets 100%, or close to it, to train guide dogs, not to fritter away on soft toys from some Chinese sweat shop, and postage on the alleged progress of your "pup".

Charities have a name for people who fall for all these sob stories; it's "Dorothy Donors", generally women, usually pensioners, and easy targets. they used to free sell lists of Dorothy Donors to other charities so they could take advantage of their good nature and generosity. There was a radio programme on just this a couple of years ago.
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 17:53
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Join Date: Oct 2002
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Sadly it seems that charities are now just doing what is becoming normal practice. It's near impossible to look at anything and not see a begging request. On social media, people outright asking for money is now normal, usually thinly disguised as a "help support me" request or some such. Charities have to keep up with what's changing in society, and as it's now seen as pretty normal for some to hold out their hands and ask for money, often using pretty blatant language, so the charities have to do the same.

Some of the TV charity ads do really annoy, to the point where I just mute the sound whilst they're on, but if they didn't work, they wouldn't use them. I'm sticking to the same system for charitable giving I've used for decades - I give to charities that have a close personal connection to either myself, my family or my friends. The MS Society is always top of the list, simply because my father died at the age of 44 with acute, non-remitting, MS. Next comes Cancer Research UK, for a similar reason, along with Macmillan. I used to donate to the RNLI, but stopped when some of their policies seemed to be just OTT, plus they are very well funded by comparison with some other charities. The only other charities that get support from time to time are local ones, like our church, village hall and youth club, plus what I think are important causes, like the Poppy Appeal.
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 18:02
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iws
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Yes, I do similar. I donate to local causes, where I am pretty sure that a larger percentage of the donation actually goes where it is needed,
rather than paying for hierarchies of managers.
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 18:16
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The proportion of donations that ends up going to the charity's cause can vary a lot. Last time I looked the better charities used close to 90% of the money donated to them for their stated aim, the worst less than 30%. With local charities the chances are that there are no employees, and that pretty much all the money raised gets spent on the primary cause. I know this is the case for our church and village hall, as I know the volunteers that run them. I think some may lose sight of the way local charities are able to punch well above their weight, too. Our village hall has been a food bank hub for around a year now, plus is being set up as a mass vaccination centre, both functions that have a significantly wider benefit to the local area than some of the things village halls might best be remembered for.
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 18:30
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I hate, loathe, detest to extremes any advertisement for anything! Almost without exception, they have been 'crafted' by overpaid leeches on society who reduce the quality of their accompanying output to the lowest common denominator. I never watch commercial TV nowadays and commercial radio finished, for me, with the advent of Caroline !! As for charity, one only - the Sally Ann and that to their street collectors. If that sounds extreme, it derives from a childhood where charities were simple in concept and execution, not psychologically 'engineered' for maximum income - in order to cover the outrageous salaries of the fund raisers.
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 18:47
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iws
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I quite agree - what a pathetic excuse is "The Right to Choose"
bollocks trotted out by those in advertising.

It's an Interesting experince to tune in at random to see what the chances are of
landing on a programme or an ad. I don't know what the proprtion is on Satellite TV
but I mostly seem to land on an ad break.

That's one reason I don't subscribe to Sky. Pay them to watch ads - I should cocoa!
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 19:30
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I check
https://www.charitynavigator.org
Which reviews charities and ranks them by various categories, including the amount of money raised that goes to the intended recipients versus the people running the charity.

And
https://www.givewell.org
with which I am less familiar.
--------
When someone calls to ask you to donate money to charity in the USA, they are required to tell you what percentage goes to the charity IF YOU ASK.

These spam quasi-fraudulent "charities" almost always say, "We donate at least 10% if the money we receive..." (which isn't much.) Many hang up when I ask.

My take is that if I donate $100 to help the families of [fill in the box], and the organization spends $90 on champagne and caviar, leaving $10 for a deserving person who is probably unaware that this "charity" exists, why wouldn't I try to give the money more directly to someone who truly needs it?
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 19:43
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My mailbox is stuffed with requests for money this time of year.

Apparently repetition pays off for some charities, as eventually you'll forget when you last gave them money, and so you send more.

One charity, that I never heard of, killed any sympathy I had by sending me a coffee mug with my name on it, spelled incorrectly!

How much did that cost? You care so much that you send a personalized gift but don't even know my name?!?

So what could have been a good come-on bombed within moments.

And, whoever they are, they sold my misspelled name to other "charities," which immediately hit the recycling bin when I see the spelling.
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Old 6th Dec 2020, 14:02
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Originally Posted by Cornish Jack View Post
I hate, loathe, detest to extremes any advertisement for anything! Almost without exception, they have been 'crafted' by overpaid leeches on society who reduce the quality of their accompanying output to the lowest common denominator. I never watch commercial TV nowadays and commercial radio finished, for me, with the advent of Caroline !! As for charity, one only - the Sally Ann and that to their street collectors. If that sounds extreme, it derives from a childhood where charities were simple in concept and execution, not psychologically 'engineered' for maximum income - in order to cover the outrageous salaries of the fund raisers.
As it happens, I disagree completely that charity fundraisers are paid outrageous salaries but next time you give money to a Salvation Army collector you might want to ask them why they don't get rid of this building in central London and move to a business park in, say, Middlesbrough. Just to be clear, I am not suggesting that they shouldn't have a head office, and nor do I agree with the notion that people who run multi-million pound income organisations shouldn't get paid - that is such a lazy notion that is trotted out time and time again by people who haven't thought it through clearly.



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Old 6th Dec 2020, 14:16
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Captivep

You could make the same criticism of most national charities. Nearly all of them have expensive staffed facilities in London. Why, I don't know, they could lease offices for a lot less in almost any town or city outside London, and could employ staff, again at a fraction of the cost. There is no need whatsoever to be headquartered in London, if they feel the need to lobby government there's always the train to London, and as surely they must have realised by now, media interviews can be done down the line, using 21st century technology.

Many of the large charities are more interested in lining their own nests that helping the people that they beg cash for.
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Old 6th Dec 2020, 16:42
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Originally Posted by ATNotts View Post
Captivep

You could make the same criticism of most national charities. Nearly all of them have expensive staffed facilities in London. Why, I don't know, they could lease offices for a lot less in almost any town or city outside London, and could employ staff, again at a fraction of the cost. There is no need whatsoever to be headquartered in London, if they feel the need to lobby government there's always the train to London, and as surely they must have realised by now, media interviews can be done down the line, using 21st century technology.

Many of the large charities are more interested in lining their own nests that helping the people that they beg cash for.
i totally agree with your first paragraph.
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Old 6th Dec 2020, 17:17
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Originally Posted by Captivep View Post
i totally agree with your first paragraph.
My final line (that you may not have agreed with so wholeheartedly!!) was because very often, with charities such as Oxfam take a fairly large chunk of donations to cover administration, which will often include large salaries for directors, marketing people and the like, not to mention paying High Street "chuggers".
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