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Pronunciation of 'Minutiae'

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Pronunciation of 'Minutiae'

Old 25th Jun 2020, 20:17
  #81 (permalink)  
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How do you pronounce pronunce?
With a Scottish accent.....

https://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/dost/pronunce_v_1
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Old 25th Jun 2020, 21:45
  #82 (permalink)  
 
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I once met a policeman from Alabama, who told me his name was Beale Bird.
Thinking it was an odd name, I asked "Is that spelled Beal or Beale?"
"No! It's Bee Ahh Ell Ell, Bee-yul!"
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Old 26th Jun 2020, 06:24
  #83 (permalink)  
 
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Being a foreigner who loves English language I am always interested in how people pronounce words in different areas of the UK and USA (especially the latter as I travelled a lot across the country).

I totally agree with ORAC who wrote some posts above: "Pronounce how you were taught, as long as others understand you".

I recall a funny story from my school days in early 70's. We were of course taught classical pronunciation, but while listening to British rock music (which most of the boys were fans of) often heard alternative sounds.

E.g., those who pronounced the word "often" letter-by-letter (as it is in Russian and to a large extent in German) immediately received bad marks (we were taught to say "ofn"). Once I tried to defend a classmate telling the teacher that Ian Gillan (Deep Purple) was clearly signing "of-ten" in "Soldier of Fortune", and also he was singing "4 tune" and not "4chn" as we were taught. And wondered why was this. She (reasonably) answered that it might be a rare dialect in some province and suggested that he was just a "country boy". This blew up the class and some started murmured something like "you are a f...g country girl and Ian is a superstar".

Last edited by A_Van; 26th Jun 2020 at 06:46.
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Old 26th Jun 2020, 06:32
  #84 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by El Grifo View Post
Fair doo's Amigo but not too bad a stab at it, by an ex-patriot Jock
Where I come from, a fair doo is a fine-looking pigeon.
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Old 26th Jun 2020, 06:47
  #85 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by A_Van View Post
Being a foreigner who loves English language I am always interested in how people pronounce words in different areas of the UK and USA (especially the latter as I travelled a lot across the country).

I totally agree with ORAC who wrote some posts above: "Pronounce how you were taught, as long as others understand you".

I recall a funny story from my school days in early 70's. We were of course taught classical pronunciation, but while listening to British rock music (which most of the boys were fans of) often heard alternative sounds.

E.g., those who pronounced the word "often" letter-by-letter (as it is in Russian and to a large extent in German) immediately received bad marks. Once I tried to defend a classmate telling the teacher that Ian Gillan(Deep Purple) was clearly signing "of-ten" in "Soldier of Fortune", and also he was singing "4 tune" and not "4chn" as we were taught. And wondered why was this. She (reasonably) answered that it might be a rare dialect in some province and suggested that he was just a "country boy". This blew up the class and some started murmured something like "you are a f...g country girl and Ian is a superstar".
Yes, silent letters in English are always challenging for those whose mother tongue sounds every letter AND who learn from reading/writing rather than talking/listening.

Here the English teachers invariably mispronounce many words and insist that generations of students do the same. They believe that when an English speaker pronounces a baby sheep as LAM rather than LAM-B, we are just being lazy and the 'proper' way is of course to give that B its full weight.

There are 100s of examples: juice pronounced JOO-IS, mosquito pronounced MOZ-KWEE-TOE and many more. In fact, I think it in now becoming a legitimate alternative English usage and I would never dream of 'correcting' it.
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Old 26th Jun 2020, 07:30
  #86 (permalink)  
 
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For example from the brilliant Tom Lehrer

Silent E

Who can turn a can into a cane?
Who can turn a pan into a pane?
It's not too hard to see
It's Silent E

Who can turn a cub into a cube?
Who can turn a tub into a tube?
It's elementary
For Silent E

He took a pin and turned it into pine
He took a twin and turned him into twine

Who can turn a cap into a cape?
Who can turn a tap into a tape?
A little glob becomes a globe instantly
If you just add Silent E

He turned a dam - Alikazam! - into a dame
But my friend Sam stayed just the same

Who can turn a man into a mane?
Who can turn a van into a vane?
A little hug becomes huge instantly
Don't add W, don't add X, and don't add Y or Z
Just add Silent E

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Old 26th Jun 2020, 11:28
  #87 (permalink)  

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Been out of circulation in Scotland for 27 years now, but still hold the accent.
From memory and from listening to various sources,
"pronownce" was and still is the pronounciation used.
You will sleep more soundly armed with that info :-)
Slds.
El Grifo

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Old 26th Jun 2020, 16:43
  #88 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Ascend Charlie View Post
I once met a policeman from Alabama, who told me his name was Beale Bird.
Thinking it was an odd name, I asked "Is that spelled Beal or Beale?"
"No! It's Bee Ahh Ell Ell, Bee-yul!"
as in Dalziel...
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Old 26th Jun 2020, 16:57
  #89 (permalink)  
 
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My new tee eye.
Simples
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