Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

Pronunciation of 'Minutiae'

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Pronunciation of 'Minutiae'

Old 17th Jun 2020, 08:13
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: England
Posts: 349
Originally Posted by WingNut60 View Post
Aren't we arguing over burger all here?
Or the next best thing to it?
I think the polite word would be minutiae.
Sallyann1234 is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 08:23
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Kiribati
Posts: 25
Let's consider the vocals, "i", "u", and the group "tiae", split into "t", "i", "ae" , and all their pronunciations (in brackets in the English words):
- "i", similar to (y)esterday;
- "u", similar to b(oo)k;
- "t", similar to (z)ulu;
- "i", similar to (y)esterday;
- "ae", similar to (a)nd.


-
capricorn23 is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 08:36
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: UK
Age: 55
Posts: 2,823
- "u", similar to b(oo)k;
Northern English dialect or Estuary English? IE. u - ooooooh Or u - uh?
TURIN is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 08:38
  #24 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 11,894
Originally Posted by capricorn23 View Post
Let's consider the vocals, "i", "u", and the group "tiae", split into "t", "i", "ae" , and all their pronunciations (in brackets in the English words):
- "i", similar to (y)esterday;
- "u", similar to b(oo)k;
- "t", similar to (z)ulu;
- "i", similar to (y)esterday;
- "ae", similar to (a)nd.
That's just plain weird.

You can't just split an English word into individual letters and work out the pronunciation that way (though you can up to a point in, say, German).

For example, how do you pronounce the "t" in nation and native, respectively ?
DaveReidUK is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 08:52
  #25 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 10,612
The difference in pronunciation in English between parts of the UK, the UK and USA/Canada, India etc shows pronunciation changes. My earlier post demonstrated the pronunciation of Katin changes between Roaman classes over time and then across the Romance languages and the ages. If you do a search on the pronunciation on minutiae you will find those sites offering audio provide both UK and American - but not other nations.

Pronounce how you were taught, as long as others understand you.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Vowel_Shift

In the UK


And ongoing in the USA


Last edited by ORAC; 17th Jun 2020 at 09:06.
ORAC is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 08:54
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 1,306
Used to be the standard 'silly question' - how do you pronounce the word 'Ghoti'?...
Fish, . ???
GH as in rough
o as in women
ti as in ration
English is a glorious language, mis-used by many, (especially politicians), but offering the joys of puns, Spoonerisms, Prof. Unwin and, of course, 'The Bard'.
To continue (in England) how do you pronounce Cholmondeley, Featherstonehaugh and Beaulieu ... and, and, and...?
Cornish Jack is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 09:02
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: The Smaller Antipode
Age: 85
Posts: 0
It's though as if he thought he coughed as he ploughed the field ?
ExSp33db1rd is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 09:09
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Kiribati
Posts: 25
Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
That's just plain weird.

You can't just split an English word into individual letters and work out the pronunciation that way (though you can up to a point in, say, German).

For example, how do you pronounce the "t" in nation and native, respectively ?
I just put my humble input into the discussion, if you wish the real pronunciation you should refer to a Latin professor. Anyway, I don't find the "sounds splitting" such a weird thing if you try to have a common base between different languages.
Regarding the "t" pronunciation, it should be "tee", but in that word (minutiae) it is similar to the letter "z" of the word zulu.
The last group, "ae" sounds better like (e)bb.
Kind regards
capricorn23 is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 09:12
  #29 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 10,612
I take it you already know

I take it you already know
Of tough and bough and cough and dough?
Others may stumble, but not you,
On hiccough, thorough, lough and through?
Well done! And now you wish, perhaps,
To learn of less familiar traps?

Beware of heard, a dreadful word
That looks like beard and sounds like bird,
And dead: it's said like bed, not bead -
For goodness sake don't call it deed!
Watch out for meat and great and threat
(They rhyme with suite and straight and debt).

A moth is not a moth in mother,
Nor both in bother, broth in brother,
And here is not a match for there
Nor dear and fear for bear and pear,
And then there's dose and rose and lose -
Just look them up - and goose and choose,

And cork and work and card and ward,
And font and front and word and sword,
And do and go and thwart and cart -
Come, come, I've hardly made a start!
A dreadful language? Man alive!
I'd mastered it when I was five!
ORAC is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 09:28
  #30 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 1,870
Going back to kangaroota's opening post, probably many variations but certainly, under no account "option B"!
ATNotts is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 10:45
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Richard Burtonville, South Wales.
Posts: 1,892
Based on Alnwick, Southwark and Althorp, you can pronounce it any flippin' way you want. My preference is 'ree-lee-tinee-stuff'. Spelled, minutiae.

You're welcome

CG
charliegolf is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 10:53
  #32 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Japan
Posts: 735
On my way to Alresford from Happisburgh, I finally had time to get down to the nitty gritty. The devil was in the detail, though.
jolihokistix is online now  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 10:58
  #33 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: In the pension queue, Lancashire, UK
Age: 77
Posts: 206
'ree-lee-tinee-stuff'

AKA the small print. Ignore it at your peril.

GG
Groundgripper is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 11:54
  #34 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Kiribati
Posts: 25
Originally Posted by TURIN View Post
Northern English dialect or Estuary English? IE. u - ooooooh Or u - uh?
...I can't help, sorry, English in not my native language...
capricorn23 is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 12:29
  #35 (permalink)  
Cunning Artificer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: The spiritual home of DeHavilland
Age: 73
Posts: 3,116
Keep it simple and just use "small print"
Blacksheep is offline  
Old 17th Jun 2020, 14:41
  #36 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: 5Y
Posts: 476
Originally Posted by TURIN View Post
My-new-she-eye.
..that one
double_barrel is offline  
Old 18th Jun 2020, 12:48
  #37 (permalink)  
Cunning Artificer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: The spiritual home of DeHavilland
Age: 73
Posts: 3,116
You think English pronunciation is difficult? Try learning Cymraeg!
Blacksheep is offline  
Old 18th Jun 2020, 14:19
  #38 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Richard Burtonville, South Wales.
Posts: 1,892
Originally Posted by Blacksheep View Post
You think English pronunciation is difficult? Try learning Cymraeg!
Actually easier, when you grasp a few alphabet essentials and accept it's phonetic.

CG
charliegolf is offline  
Old 18th Jun 2020, 14:35
  #39 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 10,612
I thought that died out with Carthage.......
ORAC is offline  
Old 18th Jun 2020, 23:47
  #40 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: SW England
Age: 73
Posts: 3,820
I just put my humble input into the discussion, if you wish the real pronunciation you should refer to a Latin professor.
As an RC I was brought up with Latin as spoken in the church in the days of the Tridentine Mass, with hard 'v's and 'j' etc. Then aged 12 I went to grammar school and had to learn the pronunciation as taught there. Thus Juvenal became Yoowenal, Cicero (pronounced Sisero) became Kickero, Caesar (Seezer) became Kaiser, and so on. Very confusing for a while, and I guess it depends on which Latin professor you believe
Tankertrashnav is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.