Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

Cook Straight NZ - Floating Bridge Idea

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Cook Straight NZ - Floating Bridge Idea

Old 30th May 2020, 05:46
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Oz
Posts: 831
Cook Straight NZ - Floating Bridge Idea

Is this solution for the bridge/tunnel question for linking North NZ to South NZ. Obviously there are challenges and the sea is much rougher with a swift current....and it's longer.

nomorecatering is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 06:05
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Isle of Man
Posts: 91
That should keep CO2 burn down and reduce the need to fly.
Islandlad is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 06:12
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Great South East, tired and retired
Posts: 2,891
Why not run it across to West NZ, sometimes called Australia?
Ascend Charlie is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 06:30
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Under a tree in the NT
Posts: 109
maybe this video of the MV Sullivan (ex Minch ferry) could give you an idea of the weather & sea state that could occur in the Cook Straight

Disclaimer: I am a ex Marine Engineer & I have spent a fair amount of time speaking to Ralph & Hughie on that particular vessel..



Last edited by NumptyAussie; 30th May 2020 at 07:38.
NumptyAussie is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 06:44
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: A better place.
Posts: 1,702
First thing that should be sorted put is spelling... it's Strait.
Second - hideously rough piece of water having crossed it many times (boat, ferry, AS350, MD500...)
Rather than a surface floating bridge - I'd suggest:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submerged_floating_tunnel
tartare is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 07:14
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Everett, WA
Age: 65
Posts: 2,883
Living in Washington State, and having driven across all four of the floating bridges in the state, I can't help but notice a few things that were left out of that puff piece.
The bridge in question is over Lake Washington - not only are there no tides to deal with, the level of Lake Washington is actively controlled to remain constant within a few inches. Yet even then, one of the Lake Washington Interstate 90 bridges sank during a big storm while being refurbished 30 years ago.
Worse, the only floating bridge in Washington that crosses salt water is the Hood Canal Floating Bridge (slightly shorter than the 520 bridge in that puff piece). It broke up and sank 40 years ago during a big wind storm (replaced at considerable expense). Floating bridges are extremely vulnerable to storms at low tide when the anchoring cables are relatively slack. The bigger the tidal swing, the greater the threat - and the Hood Canal has a relatively small tidal swing of about 5 meters (BTW the Hood Canal isn't an actual man made canal, it's a fjord).
I suspect the weather and tides in the Cook Strait are rather more severe than what's seen in the Hood Canal.
tdracer is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 07:33
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: UK
Posts: 21
Surely this post was meant to be sent out last month. I know we're in lockdown and we lose count of days, but someone needs to update their calendar as April Fools Day was just over 8 weeks ago.

Anyone that lives in NZ, or anyone else that's had the pleasure of crossing Cook Strait knows how windy and rough it gets. Done the crossing twice on the Ferry and was a hell of a rollercoaster ride, although not quite as exciting as in the video a few posts above, but not far off.
DogSpew is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 08:39
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 1998
Location: Mesopotamos
Posts: 1,333
Perhaps a politician's friend of the family cement company is biding for the contract to rebuild the bridge a number of times.
cattletruck is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 09:05
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 4,903
Its only eighteen miles between the two islands. The Chinese could build a tunnel in five years.
Fareastdriver is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 09:20
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: A better place.
Posts: 1,702
Originally Posted by Paultheparaglider View Post
My view is that if you crossed it from South to North you would want to make one return trip. If you crossed it first the other way you wouldn't need the return bit.
Very true indeed.
That's why some of us NuZulunders refer to the South Island as the mainland...

The Chinese could build a tunnel in five years.

Perhaps.
But there's this little thing called the alpine fault that might complicate matters.
The seafloor is very rugged because of the seismic activity, so you couldn't do a cut and cover tube tunnel.
And there are numerous faultlines in the rock beneath.
The currents have to be seen to be believed.
In a former life, I was a passenger in the front seat of an MD-500 flying back to Wellington from a TV News job in Nelson.
The weather was terrible, black clouds, blowing like a [email protected], horizontal rain and enormous seas - we were at around 300 feet flying through squalls.
I suddenly saw what I thought was a submarine periscope sticking up out of the water, with a big wake behind it!
Shite - what a story - the Soviets are invading!!!
Excitedly pointed it out to the pilot; he nearly pissed himself laughing.
As we got closer, you could see it was a marine cardinal mark denoting some rocks.
The weather was so foul and current was so strong, it looked like a `scope from a Typhoon class, cutting through the water.
Took me a while to live that one down...


Last edited by tartare; 30th May 2020 at 09:35.
tartare is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 18:21
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Under a recently defunct flight path.
Age: 73
Posts: 1,112
Originally Posted by NumptyAussie View Post
maybe this video of the MV Sullivan (ex Minch ferry) could give you an idea of the weather & sea state that could occur in the Cook Straight

Disclaimer: I am a ex Marine Engineer & I have spent a fair amount of time speaking to Ralph & Hughie on that particular vessel..

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hk1Ld820uNg
Good grief - had to stop watching that so as not to lose my dinner.
Lyneham Lad is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 18:26
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Florida
Posts: 5,334
How d boats get through. Some kind of swing bridge?
lomapaseo is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 21:01
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Everett, WA
Age: 65
Posts: 2,883
Originally Posted by lomapaseo View Post
How d boats get through. Some kind of swing bridge?
That part actually isn't that hard - both the Hood Canal and 520 bridges here have draw spans (I-90 doesn't - so has cut off the south end of Lake Washington to anything tall enough that it won't fit under the high level (non-floating) bridge.
The draw span opens by raising a portion of the bridge then sliding it back over the remaining bridge portion (both sides open up to make a relatively wide gap for the boat to go through).
Works well enough so long as you don't open it when you don't mean to - several years ago WSDOT killed a lady when the bridge started to open during morning rush hour - poor lady drove right into the side of the draw span at 50 mph as it started rising . Turns out WSDOT was running some sort of test, and somebody opened the wrong breaker .
tdracer is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 22:18
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: south of Cirencester, north of Lyneham
Age: 73
Posts: 1,243
I crossed from Wellington to Picton in August 2008. Fortunately, it was very calm, but looking at the entrance to Wellington, you can understand the nasty wrecks they have had....I would be a bit dubious about even a deep tunnel considering the geological activity in the area.
radeng is offline  
Old 30th May 2020, 23:01
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Balikpapan, INDONESIA
Age: 68
Posts: 536
And not too many KiWis would not recognise this one



WingNut60 is offline  
Old 31st May 2020, 00:00
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: A better place.
Posts: 1,702
Yep, the Wahine.
An iconic image for many kiwis of a certain age - right up there with a blackened Koru lying in the snow on Mt Erebus.
The lead up to this and the foundering on Barrett Reef is an illustration of just how treacherous the Cook Strait can be.
Dreadful aftermath - survivors and bodies washed up on shore in the midst of the storm.
tartare is offline  
Old 31st May 2020, 03:32
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: N/A
Posts: 3,320
50 minute documentary on the terrible "Wahine" disaster.

megan is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.