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Holst and Vaughan Williams : Making Music English

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Holst and Vaughan Williams : Making Music English

Old 13th Apr 2020, 09:25
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Holst and Vaughan Williams : Making Music English

I caught this wonderfully whimsical little film on the BBC very late last night. It's both charming and moving with wonderful evocations of English countryside. I recommend it to anyone vaguely interested in music. Warning to The Chaps though, it seems that Holst was a bit of a leftie.
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Old 13th Apr 2020, 09:42
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Sorry I missed it. A most evocative piece by Vaughan Williams: "Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis" is a personal favourite.
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Old 13th Apr 2020, 09:46
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Get it on I Player - that piece features prominently. I remember driving over The South Downs with the roof down and Lark Ascending on the stereo.
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Old 13th Apr 2020, 09:50
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I must sit down and watch "Master and Commander" again..Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis features a lot in that...
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Old 13th Apr 2020, 10:22
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For the real English music experience get to know the works of George Butterworth.
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Old 13th Apr 2020, 10:37
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Originally Posted by Effluent Man View Post
Get it on I Player - that piece features prominently. I remember driving over The South Downs with the roof down and Lark Ascending on the stereo.
The emotional connect is total.
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Old 13th Apr 2020, 10:49
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For those googley-challenged it’s here https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bshhss
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Old 13th Apr 2020, 12:00
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For the real English music experience get to know the works of George Butterworth.
Indeed. His setting of Houseman's poems from "A Shropshire Lad" are worth a listen. Butterworth won the Military Cross as a lieutenant in the Durham Light Infantry. He was killed in action on The Somme in 1916, and has no known grave.
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Old 13th Apr 2020, 15:58
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A E Houseman' s "When I was one and twenty" is one of the few poems I voluntarily committed to memory on first reading - it struck an instant chord. It's simplicity and veracity are inarguable and it became a 'natural' to produce a highly relevant pastiche for SWMBO's birthday. Before anyone else points it out, it was, therefore, a 'Cornish Pastiche'!
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Old 13th Apr 2020, 19:07
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Ken Russell's documentary on Elgar is available in four parts on Youtube now, lots of music, a sympathetic and insightful portrayal of the great man.
A great way to spend a lockdown evening.
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Old 14th Apr 2020, 00:12
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I can date my love of classical music from seeing Ken Russel's film on "Monitor" on the BBC sometime around 1963, when I was 16 The scene with the young Elgar riding to the top of the Malvern Hills on a pony, while his "Introduction and Allegro for Strings" swells to a climax in the background is unforgettable.
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Old 14th Apr 2020, 20:09
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Likewise the scenes after the death of Elgar's wife with the Cello Concerto as background and the finale on Elgar's deathbed when his hand slips to the floor, the recording of the Enigma Variations being played on an old gramophone reaches the end and clicks, and the camera pans to a view of Worcester Cathedral though the window,
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