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Coronavirus: The Thread

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Coronavirus: The Thread

Old 9th Nov 2021, 12:28
  #17601 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
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Originally Posted by wiggy View Post
same starting to happen in France…looks like Mr Macron is going to appear tonight on national TV to issue a b……king/reminder to the population about getting their boosters done as soon as they are eligible.
And if he does, it won't be in the same wishy washy half baked way that Johnson would - Macron will likely say that you get your booster or lose some freedoms, and don't expect to rely on some half baked "exemption certificate" that you can buy off eBay and hang around your neck to avoid it.
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Old 9th Nov 2021, 19:32
  #17602 (permalink)  
 
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Just sat sat down post Mr Macron’s speech…still watching analysis by the talking heads but pretty much as we expected, solidarity, get a grip/get your booster…or else your pass sanitaire will expire PDQ……wear your masks, possibility of mask restrictions being upped again..

Most of the rest of the speech was general pre-election stuff.
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Old 9th Nov 2021, 20:14
  #17603 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
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Originally Posted by Ninthace View Post
Does anyone know if administration of the booster jab is recorded on the NHS app along with jabs1 & 2? If so what is the delay between arm and app? I was jabbed just over a week ago and it has not popped up in my record. I don’t want to hasten it if it is not necessary.
Just checked - and it shows in the app in my GP health record under immunisations with the description...
Immunisation course to maintain protection against SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2).
Don't know if it shows when you use the app to get a "COVID pass".
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Old 9th Nov 2021, 20:37
  #17604 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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Originally Posted by stagger View Post
Just checked - and it shows in the app in my GP health record under immunisations with the description...


Don't know if it shows when you use the app to get a "COVID pass".
Been doing some digging too. The booster appears in your NHS immunisations record but does not appear in the Covid pass generating element of the app which appears to generate a pass no matter how long ago jabs 1 & 2 were given. Unless something is done this will cause grief as countries demand evidence of a booster jab as a condition of admission. Anyone thinking of a winter sports holiday had better keep an eye open.
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Old 10th Nov 2021, 10:53
  #17605 (permalink)  
 
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I've just booked my booster through the local vaccine centre run by the local GP surgeries and lo and behold, two days later the NHS invites me to book a booster jab, the lack of communication in a supposedly "joined up" system is a bit rubbish these days. LowNSlow - master of understatement
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Old 10th Nov 2021, 11:31
  #17606 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by LowNSlow View Post
I've just booked my booster through the local vaccine centre run by the local GP surgeries and lo and behold, two days later the NHS invites me to book a booster jab, the lack of communication in a supposedly "joined up" system is a bit rubbish these days. LowNSlow - master of understatement
From what I understand, joined up is overstating it. The GP has a system. the NHS has a system and from time to time they talk to each other (but not always as the NHS did not know about my second jab).
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Old 10th Nov 2021, 11:35
  #17607 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Cambridge UK
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Originally Posted by LowNSlow View Post
I've just booked my booster through the local vaccine centre run by the local GP surgeries and lo and behold, two days later the NHS invites me to book a booster jab, the lack of communication in a supposedly "joined up" system is a bit rubbish these days. LowNSlow - master of understatement
A similar thing happened to me (and others) for the first jab. After some discussion we agreed that -- for an inevitably imperfect system -- two semi-autonomous systems with one database (to record actual shots) was probably a good decision. At least it minimises the chances of people "falling through the cracks".
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Old 11th Nov 2021, 11:44
  #17608 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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Covid-resistant people point way to universal coronavirus vaccine

From New Scientist:
Many groups worldwide are trying to develop vaccines that protect against a wide range of coronaviruses and prevent another pandemic. These efforts have now been boosted by the discovery that some healthcare workers had pre-existing immunity to the SARS-CoV-2 virus during the first wave of the pandemic.

During the first half of 2020, around 700 healthcare workers in the UK were tested weekly as part of a crowdfunded study called COVIDsortium. Most of these people, who wore protective equipment, never tested positive for covid-19 in PCR tests or developed covid-19 – proteins that bind to the outside of viruses, preventing cells from being infected.

However, when Leo Swadling and Mala Maini at University College London and their colleagues looked more closely, they found some of those who tested negative had a protein in their blood that is linked to covid-19 infection, as well as T cell responses to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. T cells are part of the immune system. It appears these people had what Swadling calls an “abortive infection”, where a strong, early T cell response enabled them to get rid of the virus very quickly.

Cells infected by viruses sound the alarm by displaying viral proteins on their surface, and T cells are the immune cells that learn to recognise these proteins and destroy infected cells. Crucially, while antibodies can only target proteins on the outside of a virus, T cells can learn to recognise any viral proteins.

When the team looked at early blood samples from the people who had an abortive infection, they found that even before being exposed to SARS-CoV-2, they had some T cells that could recognise the proteins that this virus uses to replicate itself inside infected cells.

The most likely explanation is that these people were often exposed to the existing human coronaviruses that cause around 10 per cent of colds, says Maini. “We don’t know the historic infections of these individuals, so we don’t know for sure where the T cells are coming from,” she says.

Preventing another pandemic
The proteins involved in viral replication are very similar in SARS-CoV-2 and other human and animal coronaviruses, meaning that if vaccines can be developed that elicit a strong T cell response against these proteins, they should protect against a very broad range of coronaviruses – a so-called universal or pan-coronavirus vaccine. One way to do this would be to add mRNAs coding for these proteins to mRNA vaccines that target the virus’s external spike protein.

Adding extra components to the next generation of coronavirus vaccines might protect both against any new variants that might evolve and against animal coronaviruses that could jump into people and spark a new pandemic, says Swadling. “There is a strong rationale for adding these proteins alongside the spike protein,” he says.

Many groups are already trying to develop coronavirus vaccines that provide broader protection, says Olga Pleguezuelos at UK-based company SEEK. Her team has already created such a vaccine based on the most conserved parts of coronavirus proteins. “It’s a matter of time before another of these members [of the coronavirus family] creates an epidemic or pandemic,” she says. “If we end up with something that is as infectious as covid and as lethal as MERS, then we are in serious trouble.”

However, it isn’t clear how effective a vaccine that only produces a T cell response would be, Maini says. Most vaccines work by stimulating an antibody response, though many do also produce a T cell response.

Many groups are developing universal flu vaccines based on eliciting a T cell response, but so far these haven’t proved highly effective. Other teams are instead focusing on getting antibodies to target parts of the outer viral proteins of the flu virus that don’t mutate. However, this won’t work with coronaviruses, says Peter Palese at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. “They just don’t have a conserved region.”

Journal reference: Nature, DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04186-8
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Old 11th Nov 2021, 13:32
  #17609 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
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Originally Posted by Ninthace View Post
From New Scientist:
Many groups worldwide are trying to develop vaccines that protect against a wide range of coronaviruses and prevent another pandemic. These efforts have now been boosted by the discovery that some healthcare workers had pre-existing immunity to the SARS-CoV-2 virus during the first wave of the pandemic.

During the first half of 2020, around 700 healthcare workers in the UK were tested weekly as part of a crowdfunded study called COVIDsortium. Most of these people, who wore protective equipment, never tested positive for covid-19 in PCR tests or developed covid-19 – proteins that bind to the outside of viruses, preventing cells from being infected.

However, when Leo Swadling and Mala Maini at University College London and their colleagues looked more closely, they found some of those who tested negative had a protein in their blood that is linked to covid-19 infection, as well as T cell responses to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. T cells are part of the immune system. It appears these people had what Swadling calls an “abortive infection”, where a strong, early T cell response enabled them to get rid of the virus very quickly.

Cells infected by viruses sound the alarm by displaying viral proteins on their surface, and T cells are the immune cells that learn to recognise these proteins and destroy infected cells. Crucially, while antibodies can only target proteins on the outside of a virus, T cells can learn to recognise any viral proteins.

When the team looked at early blood samples from the people who had an abortive infection, they found that even before being exposed to SARS-CoV-2, they had some T cells that could recognise the proteins that this virus uses to replicate itself inside infected cells.

The most likely explanation is that these people were often exposed to the existing human coronaviruses that cause around 10 per cent of colds, says Maini. “We don’t know the historic infections of these individuals, so we don’t know for sure where the T cells are coming from,” she says.

Preventing another pandemic
The proteins involved in viral replication are very similar in SARS-CoV-2 and other human and animal coronaviruses, meaning that if vaccines can be developed that elicit a strong T cell response against these proteins, they should protect against a very broad range of coronaviruses – a so-called universal or pan-coronavirus vaccine. One way to do this would be to add mRNAs coding for these proteins to mRNA vaccines that target the virus’s external spike protein.

Adding extra components to the next generation of coronavirus vaccines might protect both against any new variants that might evolve and against animal coronaviruses that could jump into people and spark a new pandemic, says Swadling. “There is a strong rationale for adding these proteins alongside the spike protein,” he says.

Many groups are already trying to develop coronavirus vaccines that provide broader protection, says Olga Pleguezuelos at UK-based company SEEK. Her team has already created such a vaccine based on the most conserved parts of coronavirus proteins. “It’s a matter of time before another of these members [of the coronavirus family] creates an epidemic or pandemic,” she says. “If we end up with something that is as infectious as covid and as lethal as MERS, then we are in serious trouble.”

However, it isn’t clear how effective a vaccine that only produces a T cell response would be, Maini says. Most vaccines work by stimulating an antibody response, though many do also produce a T cell response.

Many groups are developing universal flu vaccines based on eliciting a T cell response, but so far these haven’t proved highly effective. Other teams are instead focusing on getting antibodies to target parts of the outer viral proteins of the flu virus that don’t mutate. However, this won’t work with coronaviruses, says Peter Palese at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. “They just don’t have a conserved region.”

Journal reference: Nature, DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04186-8
This fascinates me.

My daughter is a teacher in a huge secondary school. Prior to the vaccine, she was closely exposed on several occasions to infection. She shared a car for a couple of hours with someone who, within 2 days, went down with a nasty dose of covid. Her fiancé caught it, pupils in her class tested positive and last summer she was at a party with several subsequent infections. She has never succumbed - as far as she is aware. As part of the Zoe symptom app, she was asked to provide a blood sample which confirmed she had not had covid, although I’m not sure how far, retrospectively, the test goes. I don’t think she has been tested for T cells so it would be interesting to see if she is one of those referred to in the article.

Constant exposure may certainly be at work here. I worked in a primary school for many years. I was often sneezed or coughed on and removing snot was an occupational hazard! I very, very rarely catch colds - in fact, I can honestly say I can’t recall the last time I had one.
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Old 11th Nov 2021, 13:35
  #17610 (permalink)  
 
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This is interesting research. I had virtually no reaction from either of my vaccinations and recently my daughter caught Covid 19 and isolated at home. Whilst we were careful, neither my wife or I contracted the virus which was a big surprise. I do wonder if this T Cell response is the case in our situation and if the regular vaccinations we both have over the years for Flu have generated this in built defence. We both also had other jabs put into us over the years during our military service including in my case, Anthrax. Fingers crossed I have an army of these T-Cells on constant guard as we recently lost a wider family member to Covid.

Edit to say I was also tested for antibodies to show if I had been previously infected and my test came back negative as well.
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 10:51
  #17611 (permalink)  
 
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Tested negative for antibodies ? I get a monthly check and it is now always positive for antibodies owing to vaccination. Can they tell the difference between antibodies caused by vaccine and those from a past infection ?
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 11:14
  #17612 (permalink)  
 
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Can they tell the difference between antibodies caused by vaccine and those from a past infection ?
Yes they can. The antibody test I undertook specifically stated that it would only detect antibodies from an actual Covid infection and not those generated as a result of vaccination
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 11:55
  #17613 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Widger View Post
Yes they can. The antibody test I undertook specifically stated that it would only detect antibodies from an actual Covid infection and not those generated as a result of vaccination
Confirmed here
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/corona...d-coronavirus/
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 13:12
  #17614 (permalink)  
 
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Hmm, I'm being shortchanged in that survey.
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 14:23
  #17615 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Mr Optimistic View Post
Hmm, I'm being shortchanged in that survey.
I think that we are talking about different tests for different antibodies, sometimes applied to the same sample.

For example this commercial offering:
Covid-19 Antibody and Vaccine Immunity Test
https://monitormyhealth.org.uk/covid...immunity-test/
This test bundle combines our two COVID-19 antibody tests:

COVID-19 Antibody Test: This test looks for COVID-19 antibodies in a blood sample. Antibodies are made by the body in response to the virus. A positive antibody result indicates that you have had the COVID-19 virus in the past. This tes
t will not provide you with a numerical value.

COVID-19 Vaccine Immunity Test: This test looks for COVID-19 spike protein antibodies in a blood sample. All currently available vaccines use the spike protein to produce an immune response. A positive antibody result indicates that you
have produced antibodies in response to the vaccine or past COVID-19 infection.


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Old 12th Nov 2021, 15:28
  #17616 (permalink)  
 
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Had my booster yesterday
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 16:23
  #17617 (permalink)  
 
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@Peter H. Thanks. Seem to recall an early post which showed two antibody results on the same sheet, p & n or something. That may be it. Had my booster yesterday so 3 shots of pfizer.
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 16:39
  #17618 (permalink)  
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Got my booster arranged for early December - exactly six months. 2 x AZ and 1 x Pfizer...
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 18:25
  #17619 (permalink)  
 
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Mine are the same Mr Optimistic, 3 shots of pfizer..

but thinking about it, perhaps we should have travelled Austria for it..


https://news.sky.com/story/covid-19-...s-jab-12464616

A brothel in Vienna is providing COVID-19 vaccinations and giving those who take up the offer vouchers for a free visit.

Fun Palast is hoping to increase vaccination rates, as well as client numbers which have dropped because of the pandemic, according to Mail Online.
a quick jab in the arm followed by a quick….


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Old 12th Nov 2021, 18:38
  #17620 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
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Is BoJo trying to sound Churchillian with these quotes?

‘I am seeing the storm clouds gathering over parts of the European continent. The urgency of getting the booster jab is more evident than ever.’
"While Cop26 would not be the end of climate change, it can and it must mark the beginning of the end."
Pillock

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