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Fires in Oz as of 1 January 2020

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Fires in Oz as of 1 January 2020

Old 8th Jan 2020, 00:24
  #81 (permalink)  
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Wow, this brings it home, stay safe guys
Should check the cred of any media "reports" before reposting.
Snopes
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Old 8th Jan 2020, 01:28
  #82 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Hydromet View Post
Pretty well summed up, SnowFella. I think he was a bit slow off the mark in responding and misread the public mood at first, and he did seem to be taking advantage of photo ops, but in reality, there was little need for him to be on the ground.

There was real concern that the southerly would bring the fire to currently untouched areas around Jervis Bay. Dodged a bullet there.
While the Jervis Bay area was OK, areas west on the escarpment & Kangaroo Valley weren't so fortunate.
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Old 8th Jan 2020, 03:26
  #83 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by 601 View Post
Should check the cred of any media "reports" before reposting.
Snopes

And you should read the artiicle, I know it's not a photograph but a condensed study of the blazes showing how widespread they are using NASA data, it explains that, and it's still a wow.
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Old 8th Jan 2020, 03:45
  #84 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
And you should read the artiicle, I know it's not a photograph but a condensed study of the blazes showing how widespread they are using NASA data, it explains that, and it's still a wow.
NutLoose from the article this is not the 'blazes' but areas affected by them, and the image maker is

an image maker who specialises in photography, retouching and creative imaging
My bold.

It may benefit all of us if you check stuff before posting a link: even better, start adding the article as a quote rather than just a url would be helpful too

This is a 3D visualisation of the fires in Australia. NOT A PHOTO. Think of this as prettier looking graph.

This is made from data from NASA’s FIRMS (Satellite data regarding fires) between 05/12/19 – 05/01/20. These are all the areas which have been affected by bushfires.

Scale is a little exaggerated due to the render’s glow, but generally true to the info from the NASA website. Also note that NOT all the areas are still burning, and this is a compilation.
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Old 8th Jan 2020, 04:11
  #85 (permalink)  
 
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Please stop trying to put words into my mouth, I intially commented "Wow, this brings it home, stay safe guys" which it does, the text in the article explains everything. Your line about not the blazes but areas effected by them is contradicted in the second quote about areas effected by bush fires and as I said a condensed study, hence not a photograph... And as said stay safe.
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Old 8th Jan 2020, 05:01
  #86 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
Wow, this brings it home, stay safe guys

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-51020564
This is how the rest of the world views our country right now.
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Old 8th Jan 2020, 10:11
  #87 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Ironpot View Post
This is how the rest of the world views our country right now.
by 'Make Australia Magma Again'
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Old 10th Jan 2020, 23:19
  #88 (permalink)  
 
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Notice the inner-city elites now protesting demanding to have the PM sacked and more money given to the volunteer fire fighters.They don't seem to have a very good idea about how democracy works as they demand the sacking of the PM. By who, the Queen's representative? Thats been tried before and it didn't go down well with the same inner city elites. They had their chance to elect a gung ho spare no expense spared climate change warrior and the country soundly rejected him.The funny thing was it was pouring rain on the protest.
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Old 10th Jan 2020, 23:49
  #89 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Lookleft View Post
Notice the inner-city elites now protesting demanding to have the PM sacked and more money given to the volunteer fire fighters.They don't seem to have a very good idea about how democracy works as they demand the sacking of the PM. By who, the Queen's representative? Thats been tried before and it didn't go down well with the same inner city elites. They had their chance to elect a gung ho spare no expense spared climate change warrior and the country soundly rejected him.The funny thing was it was pouring rain on the protest.
The PM can and has been sacked before as they are elected by the parliamentarions of the party in power (Turnbull, Abbott, Rudd & Gillard)
The Government however is a different matter. We the electorate have an opportunity to do that every 3 years, or the Queens representative can do that in the event of the government proving that it cannot effectively govern, or as Turnbull did, sack itself by using a double dissolution.
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 02:08
  #90 (permalink)  
 
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We the electorate have an opportunity to do that every 3 years,
As I said the electorate had the opportunity in May, if it wanted to, to put someone in Government who apparently would have had policies that would have prevented the bushfires. I don't think coming off that electoral win that the Liberal party is about to give ScoMo the heave ho, do you?

The PM can and has been sacked before as they are elected by the parliamentarions of the party in power (Turnbull, Abbott, Rudd & Gillard)
For entirely selfish internal party political reasons. Protesting students are not about to have any influence in this regard.

Queens representative can do that in the event of the government proving that it cannot effectively govern,
A unique set of circumstances that cannot be repeated. If it cannot effectively govern then a no confidence motion in parliament will see a general election. The problem in 1975 was the PM unable to secure supply Bills and refusing to call for an election.
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Old 13th Jan 2020, 14:00
  #91 (permalink)  
 
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It might help if the State and Federal Governments listened to the people who have been looking after the countryside for thousands of years...

Australia fires: Aboriginal planners say the bush 'needs to burn'
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Old 13th Jan 2020, 23:07
  #92 (permalink)  
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Australia fires: Aboriginal planners say the bush 'needs to burn'
Did they burn the bush for hazard reduction or, as I was taught as a youngster, for gathering of animals for food or the burning of dry grass before a rain event to allow new grass to grow thereby attracting grazing animals which were the killed for food?
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 01:57
  #93 (permalink)  
 
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Smoke from the massive bushfires in Australia will soon circle the Earth back to the nation, says Nasa.
bbc...........
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 04:10
  #94 (permalink)  
 
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Smoke and dust particles.

Part of the natural cycle in the formation of RAIN.

What a coincidence....
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 05:48
  #95 (permalink)  
 
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601, Aboriginals still burn the bush in northern WA and NT yearly during the dry, don't know about other states.
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 06:47
  #96 (permalink)  
 
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In Qld, Parks & Wildlife regularly carry out hazard reduction burns if they can but conditions have been against them. In one Park that I know they've tried for the last 2 years but conditions are too hazardous.
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 07:12
  #97 (permalink)  
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Australia fires: Aboriginal planners say the bush 'needs to burn'
Article in the Spectator this week in the UK. I presume copied from the Australian Daily Telegraph..

https://www.spectator.co.uk/2020/01/...ted-australia/

Fight fire with fire: controlled burning could have protected Australia

A kind of ecological fundamentalism has taken the place of common sense

By modern standards, my grandfather would probably be considered an environmental criminal. To clear land for his farmhouse in north-eastern Victoria — and for his milking sheds, pig pens, chicken sheds, blacksmith shop and other outbuildings — he cleared hundreds of trees. And he cleared thousands more for his wheat fields, cattle paddocks and shearing sheds.

Old man Hobbs would probably be found guilty of cultural appropriation, too, because he adopted the Aboriginal method of land-clearing. He burned all of those trees. He also established fire-delaying dirt paths through surrounding bushland. This was once standard practice throughout rural Australia, where the pre-settlement indigenous population had long conducted controlled burns of overgrown flora — known as ‘fuel’ in current fire-management talk. They knew an absence of controlled burns would invite uncontrolled burns — such as the gigantic wildfires that have ravaged much of this drought-hit nation since September.

As those fires roared through Australia’s eastern coast, killing residents and volunteer firefighters and destroying hundreds of houses, a not-unrelated court report appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald. It told the story of 71-year-old John David Chia, who in 2014 paid contractors to cut down and remove 74 trees on and around his property. The judge in this case noted that Chia’s primary motivation for the tree removal was ‘his concern about the risk of fire at his property’, but found also the Sydney pensioner’s actions had caused ‘substantial harm’ to the environment. Chia ended up copping a $40,000 fine — more than $500 for each tree.

Similar legal rulings have become frequent in Australia, as a kind of ecological religious fundamentalism has taken the place of common sense.

In 2004, Liam Sheahan was charged $100,000 in fines and legal expenses after clearing land around his hilltop property in Reedy Creek, Victoria. Five years later, that property was the only structure left standing in the area following the state’s deadly Black Saturday fires.

In 2001, electricity transmitter TransGrid sensibly bulldozed a 60-metre clearing beneath high-voltage power lines in the Snowy Mountains. The company took the view that high voltages and close-proximity combustible material is not the best combination, but duly lost $500,000 in fines and settlements paid to the New South Wales state government, which described the actions as ‘environmental vandalism’. Two years later, the journalist Miranda Devine reported that the TransGrid clearing became sanctuary for kangaroos, wallabies and three TransGrid staffers who were desperately attempting to create a wider firebreak against that year’s bushfires.

‘We’ve been burning less than 1 per cent of our bushfire-prone land for the past 20 years,’ Brian Williams, captain of Kurrajong Heights fire brigade, told radio station 2GB recently during a brief break in his ninth week of battling a monster blaze north of Sydney. ‘That means every year the fuel load continues to build.’

Even minor attempts to reduce that fuel load are punished. Let’s suppose, for example, you have a wood fireplace at your rural house. Doing the right thing by the law and the environment, you do not cut down any trees to use as firewood. Instead, you simply collect dead branches and fallen trees lying around in the bushland dirt. This also reduces the amount of fuel available for potential bushfires, so you’re on the side of the angels.

But wait! Heed the warning from NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service Central West area manager Fiona Buchanan, in April last year: ‘We are getting the message out there that removing firewood, including deadwood and fallen trees, is not permitted in national parks. We want people to know the rules around firewood collection… It’s important people are aware that on-the-spot fines apply but also very large fines can be handed out by the courts.’

She wasn’t bluffing. A man had earlier been fined $30,000 for illegally collecting firewood in the Murrumbidgee Valley National Park. Why? Because, as Buchanan explained: ‘Many ground-dwelling animals and threatened species use tree hollows for nesting, so when fallen trees and deadwood is taken illegally, it destroys their habitat. This fallen timber is part of these animals’ natural ecosystem.’

Those natural ecosystems are now, across thousands of hectares of national parks in New South Wales, nothing but cinders and ash. Enjoy your protected habitat, little ground-dwellers.

Those woodland creatures would have been better off under the stewardship of my grandfather, whose Aboriginal-style controlled burns were not limited to his own property and its immediate surroundings. Every year he would burn the long grass growing alongside local roads to make those roads more effective as firebreaks. He never sought permission from the local fire brigade captain to light these fires, because my grandfather happened to be the local fire brigade captain. His decisions were law, and his law was driven by an obsession to protect his family, farm animals and property from the ever-present risk of fire.

Some were not as vigilant. My mother, now in her eighties, recalls an occasion when her father loaded the entire family into the car and drove for 40 minutes or so to a nearby small town. The children assumed this was their destination, but their father kept on driving. He didn’t speak much during that trip, until eventually he slowed as the vehicle approached a newly incinerated farm. Sheep and cattle lay burned and dead in the fields. The farmhouse was a charred ruin.

‘This,’ my grandfather said, ‘is what happens if you don’t prepare for fire.’

He stayed there for a good long while, sufficient for the children to absorb his message. One of those children later took over as the local fire captain and continued his father’s careful preventive burning. Close to 100 years after he built it, my grandfather’s farmhouse is still standing. Fire has never touched it.

Tim Blair is a columnist for Australia’s Daily Telegraph.
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 08:11
  #98 (permalink)  
 
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It isn't as simple as that anymore - if it ever was. Victoria has always had fearsome fires and maybe that is where this lady was 80 years ago, but I never saw fires crown in subtropical Queensland until 1992 and we discounted that as an aberration. Prior to that it seemed to me that if you conducted a burn, no matter what the weather, even in a westerly, the fire would stay on the ground and if it got away - so what it would stop at the next road or creek.

The last few years are different. Fires are burning in areas which have never seen fire before and ecosystems are being changed in a way that might make fighting fires even more difficult in the future. Wholesale land clearing can't be the answer unless we wish to see all of Queensland look like the Simpson desert.
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Old 19th Jan 2020, 23:50
  #99 (permalink)  
 
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After the hysteria comes the silence.:For those who don't live here and think this has never happened before try this poem written in 1904:

My Country
The love of field and coppice,
Of green and shaded lanes.
Of ordered woods and gardens
Is running in your veins,
Strong love of grey-blue distance
Brown streams and soft, dim skies
I know but cannot share it,
My love is otherwise.

I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of drought and flooding rains.
I love her far horizons,
I love her jewel-sea,
Her beauty and her terror –
The wide brown land for me!
A stark white ring-barked forest
All tragic to the moon,
The sapphire-misted mountains,
The hot gold hush of noon.
Green tangle of the brushes,
Where lithe lianas coil,
And orchids deck the tree-tops
And ferns the warm dark soil.
Core of my heart, my country!
Her pitiless blue sky,
When sick at heart, around us
We see the cattle die –
But then the grey clouds gather,
And we can bless again
The drumming of an army,
The steady, soaking rain.
Core of my heart, my country!
Land of the Rainbow Gold,
For flood and fire and famine,
She pays us back threefold –
Over the thirsty paddocks,
Watch, after many days,
The filmy veil of greenness
That thickens as we gaze.
An opal-hearted country,
A wilful, lavish land –
All you who have not loved her,
You will not understand –
Though Earth holds many splendours,
Wherever I may die,
I know to what brown country
My homing thoughts will fly.

Dorothea Mackellar
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Old 20th Jan 2020, 01:27
  #100 (permalink)  
 
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So many people now blithely calling for us to return to 'aboriginal' land management without, I think, understanding what that would actually mean. Before white settlement, much of Australia was 'park- like' open forest with large trees widely spaced; kept that way by fires so frequent that explorers often commented when they came upon unburnt areas.

I doubt that we could ever return to the fire frequency of pre-white settlement; I doubt that the public would even accept the fire frequency required to achieve regular 'cool burns' - There would be risks; occasional fire escapes, some houses would occasionally be lost, some koalas would die etc.

The Right is blaming the Greens, The Greens are blaming ScoMo, everyone is making political hay out of the fires. I doubt that anyone has the political courage to actually do something that might reduce future catastrophes.


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