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UK Politics Hamsterwheel Mk III

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UK Politics Hamsterwheel Mk III

Old 13th Sep 2020, 06:31
  #4381 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
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Originally Posted by ORAC View Post
Osborne has been writing the same, or similar articles since April 2019 when he recanted on supporting Brexit and became a fervent remainer (what is it about converts?) and started attacking Biris, the Conservative party and his colleagues who he used to defend.
Why don't you ask Boris? He switched sides pretty abruptly didn't he? How you are meant to trust anyone who flip-flops like that is beyond me.
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Old 13th Sep 2020, 06:34
  #4382 (permalink)  
 
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Max Hastings, who knew Boris well, says in this article that Boris is a 'cavorting charlatan' ... who... 'would not recognise the truth, whether about his private or political life, if confronted by it in an identity parade.'.... 'it seems he cares for no interest save his own fame and gratification.

https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...-party-britain
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Old 13th Sep 2020, 06:54
  #4383 (permalink)  
 
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Personally, I don't care what motivates Boris - as long as he delivers.

I don't think he is unique in seeking fame and gratification.
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Old 13th Sep 2020, 07:04
  #4384 (permalink)  
 
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Where is Max Hastings living now? I thought he was going to emigrate if Boris became P.M.
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Old 13th Sep 2020, 08:01
  #4385 (permalink)  
 
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I don't think he is unique in seeking fame and gratification.
I think he'd just laugh at this sort of comment ......... and I don't think he's capable of delivering anything .... newspapers, milk, his own progeny or ................ (fill in the blanks at will)
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Old 13th Sep 2020, 10:10
  #4386 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by sidevalve View Post
Personally, I don't care what motivates Boris - as long as he delivers.
How is that working out so far, in your opinion?

CG
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Old 13th Sep 2020, 16:44
  #4387 (permalink)  
 
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We don’t know yet, do we? There’s a large measure of agreement but the final points are very important. Some here, and in Parliament seem to want us to concede them in advance.
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Old 14th Sep 2020, 05:44
  #4388 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by charliegolf View Post
How is that working out so far, in your opinion?
CG
My opinion, FWIW, is that, unlike his predecessor, he's on track to deliver the outcome of the 2016 Referendum.
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Old 14th Sep 2020, 07:20
  #4389 (permalink)  
 
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Interesting article Labour List on how Labour has effectively, become a party of the metropolitan inner cities.

https://labourlist.org/2020/09/the-e...-rural-voters/

The elephant in the countryside: Labour cannot afford to ignore rural voters

When Labour won the 1997 and 2001 general elections, it boasted over 100 rural MPs reaching into Conservative heartlands. Constituency boundaries have changed, but that cannot hide the disastrous situation in which Labour now finds itself..... As the new Countryside Alliance report reveals, Labour now holds just 17 of the 199 seats in England and Wales designated as rural.

It’s one thing being beaten in traditional Tory shires but quite another to see working-class rural constituencies like Workington, Penistone and Stockbridge, Bishop Auckland and Sedgefield – which had been Labour for generations – fall to the Conservatives. Most worrying is the refusal of the party to address this failure, even after the historic defeat of 2019.
.......

Post-election analysis suggested that Labour neglected its support in working-class Britain, including rural areas, to “expand its support among the liberal, metropolitan middle class”. It was these decisions made in the run-up to the 2019 election, and preceding elections, that led to the party’s worst result since 1935. An electoral strategy of trying to appeal almost exclusively to those in cities meant it ignored the rural electorate. The result has been a downward trajectory for the Labour Party over the past three elections.......

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Old 14th Sep 2020, 08:41
  #4390 (permalink)  
 
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“expand its support among the liberal, metropolitan middle class”
Like everybody else in this country they thought that the important people were the Chelsea latte sippers.
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Old 14th Sep 2020, 10:15
  #4391 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
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Labour seem to have given up around here. I went looking for anything in their manifesto that might possibly apply in an area like this and found nothing at all relevant. Hardly surprising that they didn't get much support. The daft thing is that the last election would have been an ideal time for them to have presented a viable alternative, as the LibDems seemed to be in the doldrums and there was clearly a lot of antipathy towards Boris Johnson. The latter was enough to get one or two of the most staunch Conservative voters around here to declare that, for the first time in their lives they weren't going to vote Conservative. I suspect they couldn't bring themselves to vote for anyone else, though, so their position made no difference to the outcome.
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Old 14th Sep 2020, 10:46
  #4392 (permalink)  
 
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ost-election analysis suggested that Labour neglected its support in working-class Britain, including rural areas, to “expand its support among the liberal, metropolitan middle class”. It was these decisions made in the run-up to the 2019 election, and preceding elections, that led to the party’s worst result since 1935. An electoral strategy of trying to appeal almost exclusively to those in cities meant it ignored the rural electorate. The result has been a downward trajectory for the Labour Party over the past three elections.......
Whatever "post election analysis" is telling them, the elephant in the room was Corbyn. People who would probably voted for Labour voted against them because Corbyn was unelectable, people have answered a "why did you vote Conservative" question with just that answer on many occasions. Whether putting in charge a more competent leader, but still from the "London elite" will bring those deserters back to Labour is difficult to say; I guess it depends on just how much of a hash the current government makes of Covid, and probably more importantly the future arrangement with the EU both of which will lead to redundancies, and people, whatever they say, don't like being worse off.
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Old 14th Sep 2020, 17:52
  #4393 (permalink)  
 
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We are living in a world of public media hyperbole. It really does not matter what a person's character is. If a 'pundit' or 'reporter' is against their policies or actions, they will describe their character in terms that would not have been used in public even twenty and certainly not thirty years ago.
By and large public figures, even if of an unproven character, try their best to do what is right for their constituents, even if that is only to remain in their position. A few, as in any population, will step out of line but most, at least in today's ungovernable world, will simply be out of their depth or at least at the limit of it.

I was once a member of a strata council. I know all the people on the council worked hard to understand the needs and problems of the strata. Later an owner described me in words some of which she had not even heard before to MrsVJ because after three or four hot water tank bursts costing the strata about $30,000 each we had mandated that 10 year old tanks should be replaced before they burst.

I now view attacks on people's character as a reflection on the writer.
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Old 14th Sep 2020, 18:18
  #4394 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: UK
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I always thought that once an MP had lost his seat, resigned, or retired then his or her access to Parliament reverted to that available to any member of the general public. However, as discovered by the Granuiad, that isn't the case. Any MP, who has served a parliamentary term, is eligible for one of these passes to continue to access the "corridors of power"
There are currently over 300 ex-MPs using these passes and they visited Parliament more than 2,500 times in the last year. Very nice to visit Parliament's subsidised bars and restuarants. Even better if you are now employed as a lobbyist.
Needless to say Parliament refused to reveal these details until they were forced to do so by the Information Commisioner's office.
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Old 16th Sep 2020, 12:49
  #4395 (permalink)  
 
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https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/...stice-shake-up

In praise of Boris Johnson’sjustice shake-up


It ought to be a good day at the office (at last!) for Robert Buckland, the Secretary of State who has outraged the legal profession. He spent most of last weekend on the media rack defending the government’s position that it might break international law to defy an agreement with the EU that it had negotiated. Today is much more straightforward. His ‘get tough’ sentencing white paper contains a myriad of proposals that will resonate with ordinary people baffled by a justice system ever more remote from the idea of public protection and punishment, lost in abstractions, passing sentences that bear little relationship to the gravity of the crime.

So while it’s bad news for the criminal justice blob — that stale and increasingly disconnected coalition of woke academics, lawyers, quangos and public sector princelings who control the levers of policy and power — it’s also bad news for violent criminals, terrorists, rapists and those who attack uniformed public servants. All of these types of offenders are going to spend significantly more time in prison. As are those who have been radicalised by terrorism inside.

Automatic release from prison, with no regard to risk or dangerousness, is finally over. That's right, the same bizarre process that threw terrorists Usman Khan and Sudesh Amman onto the streets to commit murder and mayhem either side of Christmas last year. Offenders over 18 who commit some of the most heinous offences will be eligible for detention for the whole of their lives if a judge believes it necessary.

The practical implications for these tough new proposals are immense. Holding the most serious and violent offenders in custody for longer will please victims who have been victimised again by a weak justice system. But public protection isn’t simply about banging people up. Our prisons are overloaded with people who simply shouldn’t be there. The scale overwhelms threadbare staff who have to respond to huge levels of distress, despair, violence and a rampant drugs economy driven by organised crime, a captive market and huge rewards.

If we want longer sentences to have a long term societal impact then they must be places where there is the safety, time, encouragement and expertise to help offenders rescue their potential and stop making more victims.

I have no time for the ‘cult of vulnerability’ beloved of prisoner advocates bent on outsourcing personal responsibility for criminal behaviour. But I can tell you from experience that your humanity is severely tested when cutting down someone hanging in a cell who was failed by a system that couldn't cope with rocketing levels of mental illness. We can’t even stop people killing themselves at near-record rates in our prisons right now, still less fix the problems that put them there.

This is why the second theme of this white paper is equally important. There is a real attempt to reform community punishments, to keep more offenders out of custody where bad people are currently made worse. I imagine these proposals have been motivated by Buckland’s personal experience as a part-time judge, no doubt exasperated by defendants who continually reappear in front of him, failed by the community punishment system. Those whose offending is motivated by drug addiction or whose criminality is a function of mental disorder really should not be in prison at all. Better solutions for them, either in the community or secure treatment centres, would free up a huge amount of space and time in our disordered jails to deal with society's violent predators.

The indications are that Buckland wants to reintroduce the idea of ‘problem-solving courts.’ Good move. These were first mooted by a predecessor, Michael Gove after a visit to the US where the concept of judges deeply and personally invested in an offenders rehabilitation post-conviction is unremarkable and yet produces remarkable results. As I recall, an indignant judiciary put the kibosh on that idea. I hope it’s here to stay now.

Finally, stable, long-term employment for ex-prisoners has a big impact on reducing reoffending and turns takers into givers. There are welcome proposals to reduce the amount of time after conviction non-dangerous offenders are required to disclose details to prospective employers. Those who have been inside are some of the most loyal and productive employees around. Making it easier for them to get and keep a job is one of the most important ways we have to stop the dismal, hugely wasteful cycle of offending and reoffending that blights lives. If anything this area needs even more radical action.

These proposals will no doubt be a welcome distraction from the government’s current woes but they should not be merely dismissed as such. The criminal justice commentariat is not over-endowed with insight or humility. Its leading lights are already on the airwaves and social media decrying the decisive shift towards a more punitive response to serious, violent and terrorist crime. In this respect, they are entirely out of step with sentiment outside the senior common room echo chamber.

The concepts of punishment and public protection have become embarrassing relatives in the growing family of principles governing sentencing policy. To paraphrase my good friend and former prison governor, Professor John Podmore, clear the prison system of people who are a nuisance and make room to properly deal with the people we are scared of. That’s smart justice, right there.

Ian Acheson

https://institute.global/contributors/ian-acheson


Ian Acheson is an Ulsterman with a long involvement in prison security and counter-terrorism. In 1994, he joined Her Majesty’s Prison Service as a prison officer, rising rapidly to governor rank. Ian has extensive involvement in operational command of serious prison incidents, hostage negotiation, and counter-terrorism policy and practice relating to the threat posed by IRA terrorists and, lately, the very different challenge posed by Islamist extremists in custody.

On leaving the prison service, Ian was appointed director of the international prison charity Prisoners Abroad, supporting British citizens detained overseas. A spell as head of region for the government’s Youth Justice Board in Southwest England led to a senior Civil Service role with the Home Office as director of community safety with responsibility for running the UK government’s counter-terrorism strategy, CONTEST, in Southwest England. Ian left public service in 2016 as executive director and chief operating officer for the Equality and Human Rights Commission.
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Old 17th Sep 2020, 17:07
  #4396 (permalink)  
 
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Where is the modern equivalent of Nelson, when you need someone to sort out the French behaving in an outrageous manner?


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Old 17th Sep 2020, 23:56
  #4397 (permalink)  
 
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I see that "failing Grayling" has landed himself a nice part time sideline......

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknew...Q&ocid=BHEA000
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Old 18th Sep 2020, 07:47
  #4398 (permalink)  
 
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Good to see from yesterday’s Science and Technology Select Committee that Lady Harding has brought the prescience she demonstrated at Talk Talk and Cheltenham races to Test and Trace. Who would have thought that opening schools, pubs and restaurants would have led to a significant increase in the numbers of people seeking tests?

It all blows a big fat raspberry in the faces of those naysayers who thought that she only got the job because she’s married to a Tory MP, and a horse racing chum of Matt Hancock says I!
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Old 18th Sep 2020, 08:02
  #4399 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Manchester, England
Age: 54
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A cut and paste opportunity ORAC seems to have overlooked: Tory MP David Morris told to apologise for breaching donation rules

I suspect that the Standards Commissioner was being a little generous in calling the oversight inadvertent, unless the guy is so snowed under with donations that he can’t keep track of who he’s supposed to avoid asking questions about for 6 months after each one.

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Old 18th Sep 2020, 08:12
  #4400 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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Originally Posted by Curious Pax View Post
Good to see from yesterday’s Science and Technology Select Committee that Lady Harding has brought the prescience she demonstrated at Talk Talk and Cheltenham races to Test and Trace. Who would have thought that opening schools, pubs and restaurants would have led to a significant increase in the numbers of people seeking tests?

It all blows a big fat raspberry in the faces of those naysayers who thought that she only got the job because she’s married to a Tory MP, and a horse racing chum of Matt Hancock says I!
"Dido, Queen of Carnage"
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