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Moscow Metro

Old 23rd Jun 2019, 07:04
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Moscow Metro

We are off to Moscow soon and are all sorted flights, hotel and Visa ( mission) however anyone been and advise is the Metro ok to navigate? Are the destinations in Russian and English or Russian styled English ?
thanks
K
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Old 23rd Jun 2019, 09:09
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Kiltrash,

Enjoyed this experience in Dec 17. Payment is very easy and cheap - 1 ticket one trip - really great value. No help for us foreigners so you need to do your homework. We stayed close to Red Square and what we thought was one station with 3 or 4 lines was actually a cluster of stations. The biggest problem was finding the right platform/line. We struggled until Grob jr looked down and saw the coloured lines on the floor leading where we needed to go. Enjoy, itís an amazing city, friendly people and the Cosmonaut Museum is excellent (particularly the 400ft tall titanium-clad monument on the roof!
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Old 23rd Jun 2019, 11:24
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Not only is it cheap and easy to navigate it is a tourist destination in itself. Many of the stations are works of art. Allow some time to have a look instead of just rushing to the exit. This video gives you a lot of info - there are also lots of You Tube videos which concentrate on the architecture of the stations. Not to be missed.

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Old 23rd Jun 2019, 14:21
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When I was last there,some years ago in the Breshnev era admittedly,all the station names were in Cyrillic text so I had to remember the shapes.Some of the stations,in fact a lot of them,are works of art.
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Old 23rd Jun 2019, 15:42
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Random tour of the Metro stations in scheduled for 79p ish for 90 minutes. Eat your heart out Londoners
Thanks all another experiance to be ticked off
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Old 23rd Jun 2019, 16:08
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It's easy. If you go to one of the bigger stations and ask at the ticket office they will give you an informative small book with the history, maps, how to buy tickets. There is a tourist ticket available for I think three days, which is good value. Or just buy as you go.
There is also a circular overground train route and tramlines.
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Old 23rd Jun 2019, 16:49
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Many of the stations (at least in the Centre) have English translations of the names, especially since last years football World Cup where there was a major influx of tourists.

Best also to get a Troika Card. This card enables you to use the Metro, buses and trams at a cost of 38 Roubles per journey as opposed to 55.
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Old 23rd Jun 2019, 22:55
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A great experience and not too difficult at all, especially if you can get some inkling of how the Cyrillic alphabet works (also not too difficult, AFTER you've done it).
However my one lingering memory of the ride was the noise level. Not a great problem, but not a lot spent on insulation in the coaches.

If you're coming in through Domodedovo the express that leaves from outside the terminal (down on the left) will take you in to Paveletskaya metro station and then you have access to the Metro ring.
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Old 24th Jun 2019, 05:33
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Kiltrash,

Nothing to worry about too much, as far as the Moscow underground is concerned. There are schemes/maps everywhere in each coach, with English translation, though in smaller font, helas, but readable. Voice informer also uses English (after Russian) at each station also mentioning the exchange lines at junction stations.

Have a good trip!
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Old 24th Jun 2019, 15:47
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Not been there since the mid-90s, but the metro system was just spectacular. Apparently the builders used a lot of the marble, decorations and other materials torn out of all the former churches demolished under the Communist regime. (Just think how the London Underground could be improved by the same policy!!!)

At that time, each fare was literally a few kopeks, paid for by purchasing a plastic token at the entrance booths. I recall one idiot from the US I had the misfortune to work with pulling out and waving around a US$100 bill and expecting them to change it for him. At the time, the average weekly wage in Moscow was about $12! I still don't know how we avoided getting lynched.

Yes - at that time all names were in Cyrillic. It was easy to just remember each name you needed. In fact I still recall a number of places with the kaya or kaia suffix. Finding the way back to the hotel was easy - it was 'Dynamo', the same stop as the football ground of that name.

Enjoy your trip!
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 01:29
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Cyrillic is a variation of the upper case Greek alphabet with some extensions:
H = n
Backwards R = ya
E = ye
I-O = you
Y = ou
I_I_I = sh
I_I_I, = shch
I_l, = ts
B = v

and there's a few more. Wikipedia does better.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 02:24
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Originally Posted by RatherBeFlying View Post
Cyrillic is a variation of the upper case Greek alphabet with some extensions:
H = n
Backwards R = ya
E = ye
I-O = you
Y = ou
I_I_I = sh
I_I_I, = shch
I_l, = ts
B = v

and there's a few more. Wikipedia does better.
Once you are able to transliterate from Cyrillic and learn to ignore the Russian pronunciation it becomes quite easy to recognise a lot of the root words; certainly enough to read the intent of signage.





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Old 25th Jun 2019, 09:45
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Using a Russian keyboard, an update on RBF's post: These are the more unusual and confusing ones.

Н=N
Я= pronounced 'ya' also means 'I' (ярославль - Yaroslavl)
Ч= pronounced as 'ch' (чечня - Chechnya) - perhaps best avoided in conversation!
И= I
Ш = pronounced 'sh' as in shower. (Шостакович - Shostakovich)
Щ = pronounced as 'shch' - no English equivalent.
Ж = pronounced 'zh' as in treasure (Международный - international)
Г= G pronounced as a hard 'g' as in garden
Ю = pronounced 'yu' as in Yugoslavia (Югославия)
Ц = pronounced 'ts' as in pizza (there are a number of пицца xat - Pizza Hut - outlets in Moscow)

Two very important words are spassiba (thank you) and pazhalsta (you're welcome or please, depending on the situation). Despite belief to the contrary in the west, Russians are generally polite and will respond to a few words spoken in their own language.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 10:19
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In fact I still recall a number of places with the kaya or kaia suffix.
If you are interested, the reason that suffix is common in station names is because it is the feminine adjectival ending, and the Russian word for station is "stantsiya" which is feminine. Thus "Arbatskaya", for example, is actually short for "Stantsiya Arbatskaya" (Arbat Station), As you say there are a large number like this on the system.

I did a Russian degree in the 90s and spent 3 months living with a family in Yaroslavl, and made several trips to Moscow. As already mentioned most Russians were very friendly, and ridiculously grateful that anyone would bother to learn their language. Total strangers would approach you in the street just to chat (or maybe scrounge a Marlborough cigarette!)

Щ = pronounced as 'shch' - no English equivalent.
We were taught it is found in the phrase "fresh cheese"
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 10:45
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Originally Posted by er340790 View Post
Not been there since the mid-90s, but the metro system was just spectacular. Apparently the builders used a lot of the marble, decorations and other materials torn out of all the former churches demolished under the Communist regime.
......
True, but to a very small extent only: two stations out of 50+ in place by the end of 30's.

There was indeed a large temple blown up by Bolsheviks in 1931 - church of Christ the Saver. Its remainders were partially reused. The marble was indeed taken do decorate two metro stations, which are now called "Okhotny Ryad" (that means "hunters' row in market square") and "Teatralnaya" (theatrical) . There were rumors that it was also used in two other stations, but no documentary proof has been found.

However, not only marble was re-used. In the "Ploschad Revolutsii" (Revolution Square) station one can see some 60+ big metal statues (soldiers, sailors, etc.). The metal was taken from the bells demounted from the above temple.


Kiltrash, in any case it would be a good idea to book a hotel not far from a metro station. It would help save quite some time (and money for taxi). Fortunately within the "Garden Ring" (perimeter of the extended city centre) there is always a station less than 10 min walk.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 12:09
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Originally Posted by Tankertrashnav View Post
If you are interested, the reason that suffix is common in station names is because it is the feminine adjectival ending, and the Russian word for station is "stantsiya" which is feminine. Thus "Arbatskaya", for example, is actually short for "Stantsiya Arbatskaya" (Arbat Station), As you say there are a large number like this on the system.

I did a Russian degree in the 90s and spent 3 months living with a family in Yaroslavl, and made several trips to Moscow. As already mentioned most Russians were very friendly, and ridiculously grateful that anyone would bother to learn their language. Total strangers would approach you in the street just to chat (or maybe scrounge a Marlborough cigarette!)



We were taught it is found in the phrase "fresh cheese"
Yes, good example ttn. Fortunately it doesn't occur too often, even in Russian!

If you are in Moscow for a while, Kiltrash, give serious consideration to visiting the Kremlin. It is now open every day - except Thursday during normal working hours. Allow a couple of hours - it's much bigger inside than outside, if you get my drift. As a kid, I used to think the Kremiln was one building, like The Houses of Parliament or the Burlaymont. when they said on the radio "A statement issued by the Kremlin." It was only when I was able to enter what is, in effect a fortress, that I understood that it is a city within a city.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 13:07
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Always take a picture of the station you leave from (eg near your hotel etc). Then at least you can show a local what station you want and hopefully you can get some assistance. The locals are pretty helpful.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 13:14
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Thanks All
Yes we are flying into DME and using the Aerotrans to the main station, Have downloaded the Metro map in 2 languages, English translation and Russian so not even I can get lost
Going there in October bit chilly I think and the River tour bus seems to have stopped for the season.
As others have said the people are so far friendly as noted by the help in the London Visa office, and the hotel supplying the Invitation for no additional charge
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 15:09
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We were taught it is found in the phrase "fresh cheese"
or of course - for those of us of a certain age - Khrushchev!
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 17:07
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Or Chicago in American English
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