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Sting UK Car Tank Drivers!!

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Sting UK Car Tank Drivers!!

Old 12th Jun 2019, 10:30
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
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One of the perversities of human nature is that even if you do park in a remote part of an otherwise empty car park, somebody will still park right next to your car! And often so close that door opening is problematic.
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 10:31
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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I have seen appalling driving and parking by many drivers,many small car drivers are extremely poor at parking - it is just silly to say that SUV drivers are any worse than others.
We live near a couple of schools and have seen appalling driving/parking especially by mothers who would probably be the first to complain about other drivers around their kids.
Many of these bad drivers/parkers are in ordinary cars.

Many SUV type vehicles are based on (say) an estate car and have the same wheelbase/width but they look bigger because they are taller.
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 10:51
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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SUVs, (I have never owned one), are not the problem per se. The problems are that some drivers are poor drivers, and there is jealousy on the part of others. I have seen many ‘hot hatches’ badly parked, as well as other types. A conscientious driver or passenger will hold their hand around the edge of the door to prevent it banging the car next door, but I have watched open mouthed at people who just open their doors and bang them against the next car, as Hammond likes to do on Top Gear.

Posts #9, #11 tell us that SUVs do not necessarily have a larger footprint, but they do go up further, so have a bigger presence. Regarding banning SUVs on country roads, should we ban vans and farm vehicles as well? Regarding SUVs outside school; it’s not the SUV that is a problem, it is driving to school that is - bloody walk to school !! My family all did and funnily enough, none of us are overweight. In fact, walk as much as possible full stop.

If somebody wants an SUV that is up to them, although they really should consider the planet. They are also at the mercy of car loans, fuel prices, tyre prices and garage prices - more fool them, unless money is no object.

My parents managed three of us in a 1970s Cortina estate in which there would have been plenty of room for child car seats.





Last edited by Uplinker; 12th Jun 2019 at 10:59. Reason: longer ron beat me to it !
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 11:20
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Uplinker View Post
My parents managed three of us in a 1970s Cortina estate in which there would have been plenty of room for child car seats.
You could get about eight kids in one of those - four on the back seat and four in the boot.
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 11:36
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Uplinker

Iím afraid Iím calling BS on your Ď3 car seats in a 1970s Cortinaí claim.

That car was 170cm wide (20 cm narrower than my Discovery Sport). Letís allow a measly 20cm of lost width for each door and youíre left with 130cm to split evenly between 3 car seats. Never going to happen.

I agree that old cars (as well as new cars) could fit 3 kids across the back (we drove down to Spain in a 1982 Ford Escort with my brother and I either side of my sister who was in a car seat at the time). There is no way we could have been in car seats as well.

Sorry to burst your bubble and I apologise for allowing reality to cloud your rose tinted specs.

BV
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 12:36
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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Are we allowing for the fact that child car seats of yesteryear were slimmer and far less padded than the modern 'thrones' of today?

My recollection of the 'Britax' seats we had for our children in the early 1980s is that they were considerably less bulky than modern child seats. (And doubtless less protective).
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 12:40
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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Spekesoftly

I recall the old Britax seats. However, if we accept my 130cm divided by 3 as the actual useable dimensions of the back seat of a 1970s Ford Cortina I think that 3 car seats of 43cm width each (allowing for no gap between them) is stretching reality somewhat. Even for a 1970s Britax child seat.

BV
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 13:52
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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Cars are bigger today compared to those of the 70's as a result of all the safety regulations they have to follow.

All these crash protection features take up room.

As for 3 in a back of a Cortina, well you could get three in. Bloody uncomfortable though.
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 14:03
  #49 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
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We were given one of those 'tanks' as a replacement car very recently while our far more normal car was in for 'breakdown repairs'. The car-hire agent passed a comment on collecting it for its return that the manufacturers (through who we had the breakdown cover) often use a bigger car as a 'carrot' for future sales. It had the exact opposite effect with us! It was hideous and unpleasant to drive and use. (Neighbours commented on the 'monster' in our driveway!) We are now absolutely sure that we do NOT want on of those 'monsters'. Why on earth does a 'townie' want a 4x4?? (Just to clarify, we are not 'townies'!) We hear 'snow' frequently quoted. Bollocks! Unless you have winter tyres, those heavy monsters are going to have more weight behind them to become downhill 'sledges' or add to their momentum when attempting to slither to a stop or stay on the road on a corner. (Of course, less speed would neutralise the weight penalty with these momentum problems in slippery conditions, but has one ever seen a driver of one of those monsters slowing down in such conditions??!!) But will they use winter tyres? Of course not -- "because I've got a 4x4"!! Then there's "we need the space". Well get an appropriate 'people carrier'. Not "cool" or "trendy" but far more logical.

Should they be taxed off the roads? No. Because there will be a few people who genuinely need them (farmers and other genuinely off-road folks) and why should they be penalised because of townie pillocks? Instead a campaign of scorn and ridicule would be far more appropriate.


Somebody mentioned the Skoda Citigo. Great little car. I know one that has travelled to John o' Groats and Portland Bill (so much for the 'Citi' element of the name!) and has outdone 4x4s on country roads in snow and ice (with winter tyres, of course!). It has a surprisingly huge amount of space inside it too.
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 14:30
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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We've had SUVs, American and Japanese, pick ups, estates, small and big salons, but I don't think my wife, or I drive or behave any different depending on which car was the choice of the day.
Per
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 14:35
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Bob Viking View Post
I donít know where you live but I drive an SUV and I have never dinked a door or had mine dinked.

Me thinks thou dost embellish a smidgen.

BV
Not at all! My Wife & I both had MX5s and both had pretty patterns of dings in the doors. Somebody at the local MX5 Owners Club (Dorset) described it as the MX5 curse. Not something one would make up just for the hell of it.
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 14:51
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Expatrick View Post
Not at all! My Wife & I both had MX5s and both had pretty patterns of dings in the doors. Somebody at the local MX5 Owners Club (Dorset) described it as the MX5 curse. Not something one would make up just for the hell of it.
I think 'Soul Red' is the MX5 curse, I know of only one person in the UK who does not fear it when it comes to colour matching. But I digress.
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 15:26
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Ancient Mariner View Post
We've had SUVs, American and Japanese, pick ups, estates, small and big salons, but I don't think my wife, or I drive or behave any different depending on which car was the choice of the day.
Per
You should drive or behave differently. In a heavier vehicle you should drive more cautiously in potentially slippery conditions (not always in wintry conditions!); in a larger car you should be aware that you could be restricting the vision of smaller vehicles, for example at junctions; in smaller cars you should be aware that you might be less visible to larger vehicles. Each car requires its own appropriate driving or behaviour. I think that I understand what you are saying, i.e. that you don't drive like a pillock because you are in an SUV, but it didn't come across as such!

In a recent driving holiday across central Europe we found that there was one type of vehicle that seemed to adversely affect the behaviour of the drivers in almost every country: those with a row of circles across the front!
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 16:56
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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Well, obviously you are all living in the wrong country. I can get my camper van into our local supermarket car park no problem. Between the lines width wise and one and a half spaces length wise. Underground car parks aren't often possible, though. Move to France, people.
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 17:07
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by NoelEvans View Post
You should drive or behave differently. In a heavier vehicle you should drive more cautiously in potentially slippery conditions (not always in wintry conditions!); in a larger car you should be aware that you could be restricting the vision of smaller vehicles, for example at junctions; in smaller cars you should be aware that you might be less visible to larger vehicles. Each car requires its own appropriate driving or behaviour. I think that I understand what you are saying, i.e. that you don't drive like a pillock because you are in an SUV, but it didn't come across as such!

In a recent driving holiday across central Europe we found that there was one type of vehicle that seemed to adversely affect the behaviour of the drivers in almost every country: those with a row of circles across the front!
Good grief, I drive the same in any car. As fast as possible.
Per
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Old 12th Jun 2019, 17:12
  #56 (permalink)  
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As we've gone metric, one is 184 cm........one could get oneself into the back of a Mk4 Cortina, with pillows, and be comfortable all night.

However, as this may have involved alcohol, and GSA gliding clubs, then I can't speak for the comfort expectations of normal people.......
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