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RIP John Haynes

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RIP John Haynes

Old 14th Feb 2019, 23:41
  #21 (permalink)  

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Ken, I've bought quite a few more manuals over the years but let them go with cars I sold on.
I used to buy inexpensive old bangers needing a few little jobs as our second car (usually the one I got to drive), run them for a couple of years then sell them on, usually for a profit. Negative depreciation is the cheapest motoring you can have.

Just noticed I've also got a Clymer workshop manual and a Chilton one as well.
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Old 15th Feb 2019, 00:20
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Equipment (Supply) Officer I believe......
.

Thanks Middlesborough
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Old 15th Feb 2019, 00:34
  #23 (permalink)  
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Never owned a Mark III Spit but drove one occasionally and it was fun!
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Old 15th Feb 2019, 09:04
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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The last Haynes manuals I had which saw any serious action were for my 1974 Mini Clubman estate and then my1981 Talbot Sunbeam.
The newer Haynes manuals for subsequent cars have mostly been unused, or for looking at a job, seeing 14 spanners and three laptops shown in the 'Difficulty' rating at the start of the description and booking it in to a local garage for repairs.
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Old 15th Feb 2019, 09:15
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Anyone ever attempted/managed to complete a 5 spanner procedure?

I did three times...

Second question if you did complete it, did you manage to do it without leaking blood at some point.....

I haven't....
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Old 17th Feb 2019, 11:41
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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When I was based in Toulouse, my Rover 214 overheated in the heat and blew its head gasket.

I put the car in the barn next to the house in which I rented a room, and stripped the engine down. Bit of an involved job, owing to the double overhead cam.

I will never forget my French landlady’s expression of horror and the look on her face when she came in to see what I was doing. I had the head off by then and both manifolds and all the ancilliaries etc, etc so just the bottom of the engine remained. “Oh my god, what ‘ave you done ??!” she shrieked. Don’t worry says I, I have rebuilt engines many times.

A day later, I had the engine rebuilt and good as (nearly) new.

Last edited by Uplinker; 18th Feb 2019 at 09:59. Reason: Spelling
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Old 17th Feb 2019, 12:17
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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First you needed to read the AA "Book of the Car" to get the basics of how a car worked before moving onto the Haynes manual for the specific type you were working on. The two books complimented each other perfectly.
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Old 17th Feb 2019, 21:40
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by tescoapp View Post
Anyone ever attempted/managed to complete a 5 spanner procedure?

I did three times...

Second question if you did complete it, did you manage to do it without leaking blood at some point.....

I haven't....
Haven't managed to do the 5 spanner procedure yet but one day...

I think ALL my Haynes manuals have my blood on some of their pages - par for the course; swearing, bleeding and oil in wounds - then, like magic, motor fixed after sacrificial blood letting completed.
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Old 17th Feb 2019, 21:52
  #29 (permalink)  
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Did a top overhaul on my Rover 2000 back in the eighties, book in one hand spanner etc. in the other, did the brakes too, excellent books and saved me a lot of money.
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Old 18th Feb 2019, 09:29
  #30 (permalink)  
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Rover published a video outlining the pioneering aspects of the 2000's design and construction.
What happened? Why don't we see Rover 2000s today?
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Old 18th Feb 2019, 09:57
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Rover 2000 SDi worst car I ever owned Timing belt broke which needed a new cylinder head, dodgy electrics and the door lining would come away in my hand.
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Old 18th Feb 2019, 10:02
  #32 (permalink)  
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I was thinking about the p6 rather than the SD1.
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Old 18th Feb 2019, 10:04
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Had a P6, but unfortunately not the V8. Still a lovely car. Had two Rover SD1’s, both V8’s and the second one a Vitesse with the fuel injected V8.

Completely rebuilt the Vitesse - both engine and chassis, and realising how badly made British Leyland cars really were in the process. Wasted a lot of money there, but learned a huge amount about rebuilding cars.
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Old 18th Feb 2019, 10:12
  #34 (permalink)  
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The SD1 was a crude design, unlike the sophisticated P6.
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Old 18th Feb 2019, 10:17
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Learning to drive in the mid-80's and keen to avoid paying extortionate insurance, I started off with a couple of old clunkers with the third party fire and theft option. With the first one I bought the manual for the car, for the second one I got a manual with it which saved some time as I just looked for the oily pages to work out what had been done recently.

Did have a couple of issues, a minor (to my eyes anyway) replacement job suddenly included the instruction "now remove the splunge bracket as described in chapter 6" (which was the gearbox chapter, something I kept well away from). The other was when I changed some suspension part with a rubber bush attached, half way through the instruction read "measure the compression of the bush using the gauge (part number)" which I didn't have) "or fold a piece of stiff card and cut a rectangle 2 3/4 inches high and tighten the bold until the piece of cardboard fits over the compressed bush....".

i guess it taught me to read all the way to the end before starting, still there seemed to be a few too many "reassembly is the reverse of removal".

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Old 18th Feb 2019, 11:35
  #36 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post
Never owned a Mark III Spit but drove one occasionally and it was fun!
The Spitfire (and the Herald) was a car that took no prisoners, because of the "quirky" rear suspension resulting in "individual" handling characteristics.
Having been used to rear wheel drive, but in cars with a solid back axle and fairly forgiving crossply tyres, the "swing axle" rear suspension of those little Triumphs came as a real surprise to me.
If you backed off the power one iota in a corner, the outer wheel tended to "tuck under", putting the tyre right on its outer edge. If you pushed the car too hard the tread of that outer tyre would lift right off the road. After the resulting spin you would see that there was "road rash" on the outer sidewall of the outer tyre!
The way to drive them properly around a corner is "slow in, fast out". I've never forgotten that lesson because it also works on all rwd cars and motorcycles, too.
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Old 19th Feb 2019, 13:27
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
............I guess it taught me to read all the way to the end before starting,
Yes, me too - always a good idea !

..........still there seemed to be a few too many "reassembly is the reverse of removal".
Yes, although digital cameras, iPads or phone cameras are extremely useful in that you can take lots of pics at every stage of dismantling to aid the reassembly.

Another favourite of Haynes manuals was the casual remark; “remove the exhaust system and manifold” (or whatever), to improve access....... Not bloody likely! Easy enough in a garage with a four post lift, but not spending an extra day scrabbling around laying on my back on my driveway under a car on axle stands, while it pours with rain. I am not fighting seized bolts and taking the entire exhaust system off unless I absolutely have to !

I am trying to work out how the outside tyre would lift off in a corner ??......I think there are CV joint equipped halfshafts now available to replace the Spitfire type rubber doughnuts. I think they used them on Wheeler Dealers once.

Slow in, fast out cornering is what the police teach I believe, and it makes perfect sense.

Last edited by Uplinker; 19th Feb 2019 at 13:39.
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Old 19th Feb 2019, 13:54
  #38 (permalink)  
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The geometry of the rear suspension of the Spitfire I drove had been altered in some way (bottom of the rear wheels "toed" out a little rather than in as I recall) so its handling was better in corners, though I was fairly circumspect about how I drove it as it wasn't mine! The owner figured amongst my driving instructors (though not in the Spit!) and later taught me some road handling skills including slow in fast out, something I also use when cycling.
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Old 19th Feb 2019, 14:07
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Uplinker,
I agree about DOHCs. A diabolical invention.
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Old 19th Feb 2019, 15:20
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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No, I like them - much better performance and a much quieter valve train.

However, you’re right; they do made cylinder head removal and replacement a LOT more involved !
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