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Prince Phillip involved in road accident

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Prince Phillip involved in road accident

Old 19th Jan 2019, 09:44
  #41 (permalink)  
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Where was he going?
I would have thought that there was no need for him to be 'out on his own'.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 10:05
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Curious Pax View Post
...............Seems like someone is subtly pushing the idea that it must have been the Kia’s fault for speeding. Because of course a 97 year old driver couldn’t possibly have misjudged pulling out from a side road!


I always find: “The other car was speeding” to be a strange defence. If the other car is speeding, surely there is even more reason not to pull out? How will you get less killed or injured because the car you pulled out against was going faster than you expected?

The lack of attention to speed appreciation must be something deliberately taught in driving lessons these days, because when I am doing a legal 40 or 50, the amount of folk who pull out a few Angstroms in front of my car and then glacially ‘accelerate’ to pootle along at 30 causing me to have to heavily apply the brakes is more than mere coincidence.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 10:24
  #43 (permalink)  
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Any defence of "the other car was speeding" is the same as "not only did I see them but I assessed their speed prior to the collision". Not the smartest thing to say.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 11:28
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Uplinker View Post
I always find: “The other car was speeding” to be a strange defence. If the other car is speeding, surely there is even more reason not to pull out?
Research shows that it's essentially impossible to make any usefully accurate judgement of the speed of an approaching car that you're wanting to pull out or walk out in front of. People do take the speed limit into account in making this judgement - I will walk out much closer in front of a car if the speed limit is 20mph than if it's 40mph, which isn't going to help me much if the car is in fact doing 40mph.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 11:42
  #45 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by thegypsy View Post
PN Its called the Headlights On Position
It's strange how certain ideas change over the years. When I began my motoring career on a motorcycle in the early 1970s I made the conscious decision to always ride with the dipped headlight on, day or night. Hardly anyone else did so and it seemed to enrage certain car drivers. Any number of times I had drivers stop to angrily inform me that I had my lights on. I always used to thank them, say I knew that and they had just confirmed that having the light on made them fully aware of my presence. There have been countless accidents caused when car drivers have pulled out in front of motorcyclists, with obvious consequences. A certain female car driver I know did just that and she very seriously injured a rider; apparently he was lucky to survive. It was mentioned that the motorcyclist ought to have had his headlight on...

These days my more modern motorcycle doesn't even have a light switch - the headlight comes on with the ignition.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 12:15
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ShyTorque View Post
These days my more modern motorcycle doesn't even have a light switch - the headlight comes on with the ignition.
Good stuff.

I once had a Honda C90 whose battery kept going flat if I drove around with the headlight on its "low" setting. It was only after consulting the wiring diagram that I discovered I'd be better off putting it on its "high" setting, because that also switched in the other half of the generator. So I tried that, and the battery no longer went flat.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 12:34
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Gertrude the Wombat View Post
Research shows that it's essentially impossible to make any usefully accurate judgement of the speed of an approaching car that you're wanting to pull out or walk out in front of. People do take the speed limit into account in making this judgement - I will walk out much closer in front of a car if the speed limit is 20mph than if it's 40mph, which isn't going to help me much if the car is in fact doing 40mph.
Really? I think you can judge the general speed of a car, i.e. fast normal slow, if you look properly.

I never assume they are doing the speed limit - I look and judge for myself how much ‘time away’ they are. Perhaps this comes from my motorbike days - it hurts a lot more if you’re hit on a ‘bike !
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 12:45
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Originally Posted by ShyTorque View Post
When I began my motoring career on a motorcycle in the early 1970s I made the conscious decision to always ride with the dipped headlight on, day or night..............it seemed to enrage certain car drivers. Any number of times I had drivers stop to angrily inform me that I had my lights on. I always used to thank them, say I knew that and they had just confirmed that having the light on made them fully aware of my presence. There have been countless accidents caused when car drivers have pulled out in front of motorcyclists..............the motorcyclist ought to have had his headlight on...
Agree; I rode with dipped headlight. Was does annoy me when driving a vehicle is when riders drive with full beam. That is uneccessary and hazardous because it causes distraction and can obscure other obstacles.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 12:49
  #49 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by Uplinker View Post
Agree; I rode with dipped headlight. Was does annoy me when driving a vehicle is when riders drive with full beam. That is uneccessary and hazardous because it causes distraction and can obscure other obstacles.
Yes, it's illegal as well as inconsiderate to cause dazzle to other road users.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 12:49
  #50 (permalink)  
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ShyTorque, I had SAABs which were I think the first to have day running lights front and rear. Like you I was frequently flashed for having them on. I also fitted two rear fogs as soon as they became available. It never made sense to me that manufacturers fitted one reversing light and one rear fog; it also meant having to make separate ones for LHD and RHD. With pairs at least it was an equal number required for both models.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 13:24
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Uplinker View Post
Really? I think you can judge the general speed of a car, i.e. fast normal slow, if you look properly.
Really. You might think that but research shows otherwise.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 13:44
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by B Fraser View Post
Any defence of "the other car was speeding" is the same as "not only did I see them but I assessed their speed prior to the collision". Not the smartest thing to say.
Apart from this: You may have seen police measuring skidmarks at an accident site. It is possible given the vehicle, tyres and road condition to very accurately calculate the speed prior to impact. If that works out to be clearly over the limit than I think you might have trouble.

I was involved in an accident where a driver pulled off a filling station forecourt when I was probably twenty metres away and hit me head on-ish. His insurers found a "witness" who I had overtaken two miles back who said I was going fast. (Although this was a 60 limit) the judge dismissed his evidence saying what I was doing two miles back was irrelevant.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 13:51
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 15:01
  #54 (permalink)  
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He's just been snapped driving again. New (as in to him) Freelander, no seatbelt etc. Possibly going a bit too far with the 'I'll carry on as I like' attitude now. 97 is a good age to hang up the keys.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 16:00
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by B Fraser View Post
Any defence of "the other car was speeding" is the same as "not only did I see them but I assessed their speed prior to the collision". Not the smartest thing to say.
If the other car is approaching along a straightish road in good visibility I would agree with that.
However life is often more complex and one can be in a situation where you can see only a shortish length of road which can be covered (at the speed limit) by an approaching vehicle in a similar time that it takes you to pull out of its way - and if it's going faster, the collision is inevitable. The main road in question has what amounts to a continuous curve for about a mile each side of the accident site, which would limit ones ability to see approaching traffic as soon as one would like. Considerations of that sort should have influenced the NCC's decision to reduce the speed limit I'd hope.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 16:16
  #56 (permalink)  
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It could also be germaine as to which part of the vehicle was hit.

My daughter had a similar accident. She had crossed the A road and was hit in the left rear quarter. The no-blame driver was evidently not going too fast but had only appeared after my daughter was committed. Interesting to know the geometry in this case.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 16:19
  #57 (permalink)  
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Personally, I think one of the corgis will be delegated to take the blame.....
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 16:27
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Krystal n chips View Post
Personally, I think one of the corgis will be delegated to take the blame.....
No not unless they are over the age of 70. I am going to buy a black wig and wear it when driving.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 16:41
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Effluent Man View Post


Apart from this: You may have seen police measuring skidmarks at an accident site. It is possible given the vehicle, tyres and road condition to very accurately calculate the speed prior to impact. If that works out to be clearly over the limit than I think you might have trouble.
Not any longer. The skidmarks are still useful for showing the line of travel, but with the advent of universal ABS they cannot be used to calculate speed.
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Old 19th Jan 2019, 16:53
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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ABS still puts rubber down and you just use the same model car and weight to calibrate the fiction coefficient and deceleration.

They have calibration tables for all models of car and only when lawyers get uppity about surface friction do they have to do a reconstruction test. Quite often they do a known police car test at the time and that gets used to get the friction coefficient and then that's linked to the car model.
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